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Old 01-19-2019, 03:50 PM
Prepping Prepping is offline
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1980's, I was lucky enough to go out on a patrol, as OPFOR with an OLD SF NCO on Ft. Lewis, summer. He told me to pack the army wool blanket instead of the poncho liner. We got in close to a position, observing. What he did was interesting. Had a cut down, cut, and retapped with 100 mph tape ensolite pad so it'd fold instead of roll, two sections. we draped the wool blankets when it rained, and sat up against trees with the wool blankets on us. In June in Ft. Lewis, it's cold on wet nights. It was comfortable, but most importantly, dark, no colors and NO noise. We spent the night near an active unit, so close he bitched a guy's pee splatter got on his boots! But we weren't detected.

It's a technique.
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Old 01-19-2019, 04:02 PM
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1980's, I was lucky enough to go out on a patrol, as OPFOR with an OLD SF NCO on Ft. Lewis, summer. He told me to pack the army wool blanket instead of the poncho liner. We got in close to a position, observing. What he did was interesting. Had a cut down, cut, and retapped with 100 mph tape ensolite pad so it'd fold instead of roll, two sections. we draped the wool blankets when it rained, and sat up against trees with the wool blankets on us. In June in Ft. Lewis, it's cold on wet nights. It was comfortable, but most importantly, dark, no colors and NO noise. We spent the night near an active unit, so close he bitched a guy's pee splatter got on his boots! But we weren't detected.

It's a technique.
One of the coldest nights I’ve spent in my life was summer night in Fort Lewis back in 1983. Rained all day and evening and we were soaking wet. The stars came out, the wind picked up, and it dropped to the high 30s. That’s when I learned “cotton kills.” I recall several were medivaced out early that morning for hypothermia. I packed much more wisely after that.
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Old 01-19-2019, 05:26 PM
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I've slept by many fires with: plastic tarp down first, piece of used carpet next and finally, a Pendleton Wool blanket. I grew up sleeping that way, it works for me and a lot of others.
Not saying it "won't work"



But warmth to heat ratio..... Bag > blanket
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Old 01-19-2019, 05:33 PM
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Not saying it "won't work"



But warmth to heat ratio..... Bag > blanket
While I agree that usually the bag is the way to go, there is some utility in knowing how to do it the old school way.
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:03 PM
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In my GHB I pack a GoreTex bivvy sack, USGI poncho, a military fabric-backed Space/casualty blanket, 1/2 of a ThermoRest pad and two SnugPak jungle blankets. Also a Navy wool watch cap, Norwegian Ragg socks, Nomex pilot's gloves and polypro base layer to sleep in. The clothes I have been wearing during the day go into the two SnugPak compression sacks to serve as pillow and to store inside the bivvy to keep them from the cold and wet.

The Space blanket is used as fire reflector, the GI poncho for wind break and overhead cover. The half ThermoRest goes inside the bivvy. Using this rig I have slept comfortably during wintry-mix hypothermia weather with a small fire.
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:36 PM
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50s with no wind or precipitation the blanket and liner are too much my fire just outside my shelter would be enough. I would probably sleep on top of them in my hammock. 40s and no wind or precipitation with a fire, I sleep on top of the blanket and have the liner over me with a fire just outside my shelter.
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Alaskajohn View Post
While I agree that usually the bag is the way to go, there is some utility in knowing how to do it the old school way.
Absolutely.

You should KNOW HOW to chop down a tree with an ax and\or a manual saw.

Doesn't mean there's not a better way.\I'm not giving up my Stihl 's!!!!
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Old 01-19-2019, 10:50 PM
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One of the coldest nights I’ve spent in my life was summer night in Fort Lewis back in 1983. Rained all day and evening and we were soaking wet. The stars came out, the wind picked up, and it dropped to the high 30s. That’s when I learned “cotton kills.” I recall several were medivaced out early that morning for hypothermia. I packed much more wisely after that.
"One of the coldest nights I've ever spent was during a Summer in Ft. Lewis" parallels what you said, and I heard it from guys from Wisconsin and Alaska, and I'd not disagree with them as I've been out there in June, in the 1980's. Then you'd go into some dark area and get mosquito swarmed, when not getting tore up by black berries or head out into the fields and get scotch broomed eyes.

Incredibly miserable.

What's funny is so many think our lovely trails with ferns on the side are the reality of our forests in this area.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:07 PM
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I'd suggest not having to rely on a fire to keep you warm. I rather just jump in my sleeping bag, than get a fire going, then keep it going through the night. Then again, i might like my rest too much after i've been active for a day .
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:15 PM
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I have a Capote and 2 wool blankets along with MARPAT Bivy in my Winter bag , thick sleeping pad , I do not skimp in Cold Weather , I love wool , it works. JMHO and S/FI!
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:16 PM
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Sleeping bag gets my vote. I hate to be cold. Love to backpack camp, had to invest in a warm bag that was lightweight. If I get to warm I unzip the side. But I don’t get cold.
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Old 01-19-2019, 11:32 PM
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I don't use a fire when sleeping. They always spit embers that burn holes in nylon or synthetic gear. Wool is more resistant but its a lot heavier and bulkier.
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Old 01-20-2019, 03:15 PM
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I don't use a fire when sleeping. They always spit embers that burn holes in nylon or synthetic gear. Wool is more resistant but its a lot heavier and bulkier.
This is something too think about making cold camp etc. Like Rogers Rangers and the Texas Rangers who lived SHTF daily. Build fire to cook with before dark , move a hundred yards or so establish security for bivouac settle in for the night etc. JMHO and S/FI!
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Old 01-20-2019, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by IC_Rafe View Post
I'd suggest not having to rely on a fire to keep you warm. I rather just jump in my sleeping bag, than get a fire going, then keep it going through the night. Then again, i might like my rest too much after i've been active for a day .
I actually agree with the not depending on fire concept.

Fire is the hardest to make, when you need it most.
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Old 01-20-2019, 08:11 PM
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40's and 50's is just a early summer night here up north.
Sleeping bag but you could use loose fitting wool socks (theraputic/diebetic type for good circulation, I love them ) and a wool stocking hat.
If my feet and head are warm that's half the battle.
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Old 01-20-2019, 08:34 PM
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I have a twin size sheet that I put snaps along the side and one end. I use it inside my sleeping bag to keep it clean and so I can have something on me if I get hot and pull back the bag.
If I was going out with a wool blanket I would put snaps on it and use the sheet inside it just to relieve the itching.
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Old 01-20-2019, 10:06 PM
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Gortex bivy, down bag & a Thermorest ground pad has severed me well in all sorts of unfriendly weather environments for decades.
No reason to change.
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Old 01-20-2019, 11:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Hoka-hey View Post
40's and 50's is just a early summer night here up north.
Sleeping bag but you could use loose fitting wool socks (theraputic/diebetic type for good circulation, I love them ) and a wool stocking hat.
If my feet and head are warm that's half the battle.
For me, it's my legs. I can have a light jacket, a hat and gloves. So long as I have the long johns on, I am pretty good even in fairly cold temps.

However, if I am all bundled up to the 9s, and dont have those long johns, I shiver anyway.
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Old 01-21-2019, 12:01 AM
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A heavy wool blanket is fine if you also have a canvas cover to go over everything. High winds are the problem. A deerskin on the ground helps.
I assume people are wearing the appropriate clothes for the weather, down jackets, cold weather pants and boots etc.
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Old 01-21-2019, 02:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colonel C View Post
I have a twin size sheet that I put snaps along the side and one end. I use it inside my sleeping bag to keep it clean and so I can have something on me if I get hot and pull back the bag.
If I was going out with a wool blanket I would put snaps on it and use the sheet inside it just to relieve the itching.
The itching is less of a problem if you're using good quality wool blankets. Had a cheap one long ago, and it was hell. Even a sheet didn't help. Had to put an actual blanket under it to keep from itching. The one i use to sleep at home now, i can use on warmer nights without even a sheet, and it doesn't itch.
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