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Old 10-29-2012, 09:06 AM
pauldude000 pauldude000 is offline
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Best bushcraft knife for under $150?

Im thinking either the Becker BK-2 or Ontario Blackbird SK-5?

Any other suggestions?
For many people they would consider that a "personal" question. People tend to play favorites with manufacturers, determining a good knife based upon brand name or expense. Other prefer the "look" of the knife. Yet for others it may be a combination of both. However, NONE of these subscribes a truly GOOD knife for any particular purpose or is a true basis for judging a knife for a specific duty.

The truth of the matter starts with the desired use of the knife. General bushcrafting? Self defense? Fine carving or whittling work? Animal processing? NO one knife of any blade shape fits all necessary criteria.

A big blade is semi worthless for fine work, yet a small carving knife is worthless for truly heavy tasks. BOTH are worthless for animal processing. Self defense knives are generally designed specifically for that purpose, and have many shortcomings for other tasks.Animal processing knives are often unwieldy for many bush-crafting tasks.

Therefore, if you desire a good GENERAL purpose bush-crafting knife (all around), then you have to compromise on design. It will not be a great knife for any specific purpose, but will serve for most. Blade shape is as important as composition. The blade should be heavy enough to withstand some serious abuse, have a deep enough of a curve on the belly for skinning purposes, and be short enough for some control (blade length not over 6 to 8 inches long). 8 Inches is seriously pushing it for fine work and animal processing work. An S curve style blade is generally a good choice, as it has the belly, good control close in for shaving, allows a deep bite for chopping brush, and has a fairly fine tip for slitting and hollowing. The blade should be at least 3/16" thick, though you might get by with 1/8" thick if using a better steel. 1/4" is almost too thick, though it is a fad right now.

The best idea is a two knife approach. For many this takes the form of a larger mutli-purpose, and either a very small neck knife, or a good multitool.

However you choose to go, the quality of the knife is ultimately controlled by two things. Blade material, and tempering. Even great steel can be messed over with a poor heat treatment.

Many would argue the point with me, but I expressly advise AGAINST stainless steel. The "good" edge holding stainless steels are anything but cheap. Most stainless steels will not harden over about 56-57 Rockwell, and you want an edge hardness of at LEAST 57 Rockwell. It is an inherent problem with the alloying of Nickle and Chromium in the steel, which gives a larger grain structure.

The finer the grain of the steel, the sharper it CAN get with any given blade angle or grind. Most carbon steels have a much finer grain than most stainless steels ever could achieve due to the chemical composition of the steel itself. The lower the hardness, the faster it will lose it's edge. Anything over 60 Rockwell will be prone to chipping or cracking as it is then too hard, and almost as hard as a file.

Don't be sold on brands, per say... Be sold on STEELS.

An O-1 steel knife properly tempered is going to be gangbusters better than ANY manufacturer using stainless. 1095 steel is a very good general purpose knife steel. (Hard to mess up, very forgiving in heat treatment.) D-2 is very good but expensive as heck, as is A-1. Crucible molded steels can often be spectacular, but even more expensive. The only stainless I will personally even mess with is ATS-34. Even then one of my W-1 file knives will leave a "v" shaped notch in the edge on ATS-34 in a hardness comparison test. File steel (W-1) is very touchy. GREAT when done right, prone to snap if done wrong. It is easy to "do it wrong".

So, now that I have gone all the way around the barn to be ready to answer your initial question. Bang for the buck consider a blade made from 1095. The steel is fairly inexpensive, therefore costs less in the finished product. However, it truly is a good knife steel which will both take and hold a great edge.

I think 1095 is the steel Mora is now using. I know it is the steel the new Schrade Survival series is using... finally. (About time they quit the cheap Chinese stainless garbage.)

You can find 1095 often in custom blades, as well as manufactured blades. As far as any particular knife model, that ultimately depends upon your need. Brand and cost are up to you. Good steel and heat treat makes a good knife. Every brand claims to be the best.....

O-1 and O-2 are both better than 1095. (Tougher steel.) D-2 is the toughest, yet has a larger grain structure than than any of the three previously mentioned. The air hardening steels such as A-1 really aren't worth the cost if you ask me, as they offer nothing better in a knife than the oil hardening steels such as O-1.

However, unless you plan on batoning pennies in half for a lark, cutting steel drum-heads out with your knife, or maybe chopping steel wire, 1095 is very adequate. If you try the above, it MAY do the job, but you will likely have to resharpen the blade. If you wish to do the above without necessarily resharpening, O-1 is a very nice choice. If it is a habit, bite the bullet and get D-2 or a good crucible molded.

If you intend to use it for bush-crafting work, they are all equal, and you might as well get 1095 or O-1. You will never push the limits of any of the good steels though.

I hope this helped.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by ScoutC View Post
Best bushcraft knife for under $150?

Im thinking either the Becker BK-2 or Ontario Blackbird SK-5?

Any other suggestions?
You have the whole field wide open in that price range.

Helle, Puukko, ESEE, BHK, Ontario, and lots others.

Do your diligence and figure out what you will need a knife to do for you.

In my honest opinion, I would say to save your money up for later and right now get a Swiss Army Knife, bushcraft or farmer, and use that for a while until you get the feel for what you might be using it for. Then pick up a Mora and put that knife through the paces, and then you will have a much better idea of what type of characteristics you will want a knife to have. Then you can start shopping knives.

I have a BK2, and honestly this is a knife that you can grow into, but you will want to try other knives because where the BK2 is too big or heavy for a particular task you will want a knife to compliment it for smaller chores.

If you are looking at the Ontario Blackbird, that was designed by a friend Paul over at Hedgehog Leatherworks. He makes one of the most incredible sheathes for the BK2, Kabars, Tops, and his Blackbird. I bought my BK2 and sheath from him, they are good people and are extremely customer oriented.

I use a BK2, but also a Puukko for smaller bushcraft chores, and have gotten along great with that combination. I recently bought a GB axe and have noticed that the BK2 doesn't get as much field time, so that may be something to consider as well.
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Old 11-01-2012, 02:00 AM
timothykoenig timothykoenig is offline
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Guys, do you have recommendation about mountain shoes?
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Old 11-03-2012, 03:01 PM
randon1911 randon1911 is offline
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I live in the Interior of Alaska, grew up in the deserts of Arizona. I was trying to do reseach on artic survival/ extreme cold weather survival but, havent found much. Can anyone throw some tips or a good site to gain info on this?
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Old 11-03-2012, 07:35 PM
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I live in the Interior of Alaska, grew up in the deserts of Arizona. I was trying to do reseach on artic survival/ extreme cold weather survival but, havent found much. Can anyone throw some tips or a good site to gain info on this?
Perhaps be more specific on what you want to know about cold weather survival? That is where I have my fun in a boreal/sub-boreal forest and we can get pretty cold. Not as constant cold as Alaska but we can have a few days in a row at -30F.

Some quick basics though, in cold climates it is extremely important to stay dry and clothing choice will help you a lot. To minimize sweating, we only want to work at about 25-33% of what we could do in nicer climates as this is to help prevent sweating which will cause you to cool down quickly and put you at risk of hypothermia, which is one of the main killers in the wilderness along side falling and dehydration.

Further, when you begin your hike, don't be bundled up fully as you will likely have to stop in 20 minutes or so to dress back down since you heated up and may have started sweating. To prevent this, it is best to start off a little cold before your hike since you will warm up quickly.

To tell if you are becoming too cold, a simple finger dexterity test will let you know. Try and touch your thumb to your pinky. If there is any trouble doing this or delayed response you are too cold and should start making yourself warmer.

When warming ourselves up, I am guilty of this many times, we need to be careful about the clothing we warm because in winter the clothes are often covered in snow and ice. When we sit near the fire and warm up, it all melts and gets in the clothes. This can make us weigh a lot more over time, requiring more calories, makes us colder because once we step away from the fire the water will evaporate from wind and chill us, and often it will freeze into our clothes weighing us down and damaging insulative properties of a lot of clothing.

In a snowy winter, you are at GREATER risk of sun burn and eye damage. This is because white snow has up to a 90% albedo, which means it reflects 90% of the sun light that hits it. Many of you that live in these environments know how easy it is to warm up and start taking off layers while there is snow on the ground and may even walk around shirtless. Because of this 90% albedo, this puts us at greater risk of sun burn and eye damage. Sun screen or protecting the skin is just as important as it is in summer. If you damage your skin, you ruin the integrity of your integumentary system, making it hard for your body to regulate body temperature and putting you at higher risk of hypothermia. Protect your eyes for the same reason as "Snow blindness" is nothing you want to have, especially in a survival situation. It feels pretty horrible, like sand in your eyes and will take you out for a good bit of time. Wear sun glasses, darken the area around your eyes with charcoal to reduce glare, make Inuit-style "Sun glasses" out of antler bone or wood, Take some bark and cut tiny slits or poke holes in it and wear it as eye protection.


Do not eat snow/ice. A little bit is OK but if we are consuming snow as a form of hydration, it will cool us down and expend a lot of calories. It is best to melt the snow/ice. Keep in mind that snow is about 90% air and 10% water while ice is 90% water and 10% air. We'll get our best "bang for the buck" so to speak, from melting ice. Boil the snow and ice. Unless we capture snowfall directly and prevent it from touching the ground it is always best to boil it because of the freeze-thaw affect there very well may still be pathogens living in the snow and ice. Not only will boiling kill off any bacteria in the snow and ice, but drinking the water warm will give us "heat calories" which means it will help heat up our buddies without costing much in calories to do so.

In winter, we will require much more water and calories to fuel our bodies. Here is my chart on the increased amount of water we will need.

————-minimum—-hot/cold——-heavy exercise
skin———350ml——350ml——---350ml
sweating—-100ml——14000ml—–5000ml
respiration—350ml——350ml——-650ml
urination—–1400ml—–1200ml——500ml
Defecation—100ml——100ml——–100ml
——Total–2,300ml—–3300ml——6600ml
—-————-2.3L——-3.3L———--6.6L

Snow is a great insulator if we can first insulate ourselves from touching it! Snow shelters such as the quinzhee, when properly (safely) built can be heated with candles to bring the interior up to as high as 40 degrees! We just need to prevent ourselves from touching the snow. Straw mats, bark bedding, thermal pads, pine boughs etc will all help keep us from touching the snow. A quizhee should have about 1 foot thick walls and an air hole so that it does not collapse or cause affixiation from the candles burning off oxygen.



It is good to have a few methods of fire starting on you in cold climates as bic lighters are notorious for not working so well. I believe Isobutane vaporizes at about 15 degrees F, so once you get below that temperature the isobutane will be a liquid and not produce a strong flame or at all. Keeping the lighter close to the body to keep it warm often helps prevent this, at least for a little while. Matches tend to work find just protect from water and wind. Pre-made hand drills seem to have a higher rate of success since the humidity is usually down and the air is extremely dry.

There are some tips and information. Any specifics you would like to discuss or ask questions about? Covered here or else where?
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Old 11-05-2012, 12:43 AM
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Thank You this was all great info. last winter myself and some friends decided to go out snowshoeing for the first time. after the longest 6 miles of my life, ( thats saying alot coming from an infantryman,) we stayed at a cabin with a wood stove. none of us really took off extra layers on the trip in and our outer coat we sheets of ice the next morning. ( this was a neg 40 week) great fun though just glad my truck started when it ws time to head home. more trips to learn more are planned for this winter.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:21 PM
pauldude000 pauldude000 is offline
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Nice post ThoughtfulWolf.
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Old 11-26-2012, 07:30 PM
pauldude000 pauldude000 is offline
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For those whom want more info on wild edibles... I have a link for you!

http://www.eattheweeds.com/

Over 1000 edibles listed on a searchable site. Best database I have ever encountered on the subject. I learned quite a few I previously never had a clue about as edibles, plus learned several more facts about various plants I already knew. Guy also has a ton of vids available.

Enjoy!
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Old 11-26-2012, 08:39 PM
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Awesome site ! I've been reading it for the last couple hours lol
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Old 11-26-2012, 09:44 PM
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For those whom want more info on wild edibles... I have a link for you!

http://www.eattheweeds.com/

Over 1000 edibles listed on a searchable site. Best database I have ever encountered on the subject. I learned quite a few I previously never had a clue about as edibles, plus learned several more facts about various plants I already knew. Guy also has a ton of vids available.

Enjoy!
Green Deane is a good guy. I really enjoy his content and he has always been helpful to me when I've come to him with questions. He used to be a member on this site but I have not seen him active over here in a couple of years now.
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Old 11-26-2012, 10:10 PM
pauldude000 pauldude000 is offline
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Green Deane is a good guy. I really enjoy his content and he has always been helpful to me when I've come to him with questions. He used to be a member on this site but I have not seen him active over here in a couple of years now.
I have noticed that he is a really nice individual.

Three plants he floored me with as edible were the cambrium and seeds of elm, the seeds of maple, and of all things sand-burr seeds!

He answered an unasked question concerning lambsquarter seeds being a source of flour, and a couple of other "I wonders". I know there is a ton there for me still to learn on his site, and really appreciate his effort and time to share the info.

I have long known that if a person starves to death in the wilderness, their bones will be found within five to ten feet of something edible. His site just re-enforces the concept.
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Old 11-27-2012, 05:47 AM
fissemand fissemand is offline
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Yea, I have a question. does anyone but me have the need to hide his/her shelters? Every time I've built a shelter in the woods, Hunters will come along and destroy all my work. I've had it with them. Payback time!
I've considered an underground shelter, then cover it with top soil and replant stuff on it and make the roof so an elk can walk on it and not cave it in. Anyone have any ideas on a shelter and ways to make it disappear in the woods?
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Old 11-27-2012, 09:14 AM
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Yea, I have a question. does anyone but me have the need to hide his/her shelters? Every time I've built a shelter in the woods, Hunters will come along and destroy all my work. I've had it with them. Payback time!
I've considered an underground shelter, then cover it with top soil and replant stuff on it and make the roof so an elk can walk on it and not cave it in. Anyone have any ideas on a shelter and ways to make it disappear in the woods?
This is kind of like the house of cards or unfinished puzzle. We as humans can't resist to demolish something like this. I don't know if this stems from a deep rooted idea that we are above this and to look back is taboo, or if it is simply people being childish.

Best bet is to use a shelter and then partially wreck it yourself so it doesn't resemble a shelter, then just plan on doing a little work when you return to repair it. This may remove the temptation for other to clear the landscape.

If that doesn't work then make a better attempt to utilize nature to hide or camouflage your shelter better. If they can't recognize it they can't destroy it.

Hunters are inevitably the most arrogant occupants of the forest as they feel they own everything in the forest and it is all there for the picking. I hunt as well and see this in those I come across.

If you want sweet revenge wait til turkey season and just walk around the forest following hunters and looking and pointing around. This annoys the crap out of them, and more often ruins any chance they have at a turkey. This works during all seasons.

I had a person come into where I hunt deer and set up a stand right across from my stand. One morning while sitting in the stand and hearing the deer begin to move into the forest this idiot comes stumbling in wrestling up all the birds and crawls into his stand then realizes he just spoiled my hunt. After about a half hour I crawled down then started mushroom hunting. I remained in the area making sure no game would come close. I did this for most of the morning and the idiot finally got ****ed off and left.

The thing to remember is that getting revenge on hunters is easy, just be sure to passively disrupt their hunt.
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Old 11-27-2012, 01:40 PM
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Does freezing water or taking it to a frozen temp purify it at all?
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Old 11-27-2012, 02:14 PM
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Does freezing water or taking it to a frozen temp purify it at all?
No, it does not. You still have to boil it. Ice is at about 90% water and 10% air while snow is 10% water and 90% air. You'll notice this when you start trying to melt them for water. The only time snow is acceptable to drink untreated is if you catch it while it is falling and prevent it from touching other snow.

The freeze-thaw effect allows snow to become contaminated with possibly dangerous microorganisms that are still alive in the snow and ice, just most likely dormant.
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Old 11-27-2012, 02:48 PM
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No, it does not. You still have to boil it. Ice is at about 90% water and 10% air while snow is 10% water and 90% air. You'll notice this when you start trying to melt them for water. The only time snow is acceptable to drink untreated is if you catch it while it is falling and prevent it from touching other snow.

The freeze-thaw effect allows snow to become contaminated with possibly dangerous microorganisms that are still alive in the snow and ice, just most likely dormant.
Aww I was hoping there was a way without using fire or chemicals. On that note is there? For example just though basic filtration like with a charcoal based filter?
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Old 11-27-2012, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by randon1911 View Post
I live in the Interior of Alaska, grew up in the deserts of Arizona. I was trying to do reseach on artic survival/ extreme cold weather survival but, havent found much. Can anyone throw some tips or a good site to gain info on this?
For you, being that you live there, your best site is the local bar or trading post. Hands down better than anything you're likely to read.
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Old 12-01-2012, 10:26 PM
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i think this link should answer you question

http://www.bugoutsurvival.com/2010/0...rom-vines.html
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Old 12-01-2012, 10:34 PM
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hi im new here and i was wondering if there was any literature on native american/ laplander survival/ bushcraft techniques
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Old 12-02-2012, 10:47 AM
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I would like to know if you can find flint stone anywhere, if not where do you find it and how do you identify it? Also, when using flint stone do you have to use 2 pieces to create fire or can you just use one piece of flint and a regular stone?
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