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Old 06-12-2012, 10:24 PM
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One thing that I cannot stress enough is, it is working to spray plants with soapy water to rid pests problems.

I usually spray the plants after it rains. It is amazing how well this works.

It works against insects and caterpillar larvae as well as ground squirrels and rabbits. This has been a wonderful discovery.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:37 PM
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I just found this bit of info on using soapy water.

"Liquid soaps - Only use natural soaps or Murphy oil soap or mild liquid dishwashing soaps like Ivory. Soap help make teas stick better to plants and pests, and they also paralyze many insects in direct contact. Use no more than 1-2 cups of soap per gallon of water. Do not use much on flowering fruit or vegetable plants. Can hinder fruit production. "

http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/o...329023823.html
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Old 06-13-2012, 12:44 PM
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Good one. A shot of rubbing alcohol in the bottle helps it out as well. The trick is to let it all sit for a hour, then spray off with water.

They say the bugs get drunk and then slide off...! <just a joke>


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One thing that I cannot stress enough is, it is working to spray plants with soapy water to rid pests problems.
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:06 PM
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Good one. A shot of rubbing alcohol in the bottle helps it out as well. The trick is to let it all sit for a hour, then spray off with water.

They say the bugs get drunk and then slide off...! <just a joke>
I also occasionally use Thuricide. It is an organic insecticide. It is labled safe for humans and birds. I kills any butterfly larvae, so if you like butterflies...

I like them, but do not like caterpillars in my garden so, all must go.

I realize that this might be counter productive, as far as companion gardening for helper insects but, man the pests are bad this year, and early too for my area.

I noticed that though the soapy water, stopped something from munching on my bean plant (I think is is one of those little squirrels that look like chip monks), and did slow the bug pests, I have been picking off caterpillars from plants today. I haven't found a whole lot, but one can destroy a plant in no time.

Though my cilantro does not seem to be being eaten, I found lots of eggs under the leaves today when harvesting.

My sugar beets and red beets are under attack. I did not have that problem last year.

I did not have moth larvae till well into the summer, and did not have a caterpillar problem last year.

it is a 2nd year garden. I guess the word spread in the insect kingdom.
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Old 06-13-2012, 04:31 PM
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Plant some calendula if you have room for it. It's pretty and the flowers are used in antibacterial salves. If you have an out of the way corner, stinging nettle is a great herb for health. If plantain grows in your area, it's good for just about everything.

Edited to add: What a great garden!
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:08 PM
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Plant some calendula if you have room for it. It's pretty and the flowers are used in antibacterial salves. If you have an out of the way corner, stinging nettle is a great herb for health. If plantain grows in your area, it's good for just about everything.

Edited to add: What a great garden!
I keep looking for Calendula seeds and have not found any yet.I might have to order them online.

Stinging nettle is not a problem. Our land is full of the stuff. LOL

I live in Wisconsin. I do not think plantain grows here.

Thank you for the complement.
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:19 PM
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Plant some calendula if you have room for it. It's pretty and the flowers are used in antibacterial salves. If you have an out of the way corner, stinging nettle is a great herb for health. If plantain grows in your area, it's good for just about everything.

Edited to add: What a great garden!
LOL I just noticed that I made a stupid reply to you concerning plantain. I though you meant the Mexican type bananas called plantain. LOL I thought it was odd you mentioned it hehe. Ok I admit it, I'm a dummy.

That stuff grows all over my yard.
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:56 PM
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ok, moving on, I am doing research on medicinal wild flowers and wild plants.

Let's start off with Plantain.



I have lived all over the US from the deep south to the far north and this stuff seems to grow anywhere.

Plantain is useful, both edible and medicinal. You can eat the leaves raw in salad or cooked as a herbal additiv.This plant is very rich in vitamin B1 and riboflavin. This herb has a long history of use as an alternative medicine dating back to ancient times. Plantain contains the glycoside Aucubin, which has been reported in the Journal of Toxicology as a powerful anti-toxin.

The leaves and seeds can be used medicinally as an antibacterial, antidote, astringent, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, and an ophthalmic. Medical evidence confirm uses as an alternative medicine for asthma, emphysema, bladder problems, bronchitis, fever, hypertension, rheumatism and blood sugar control. Plantain also causes a natural aversion to tobacco and is currently being used in stop smoking preparations.

A tonic from the roots is used in the treatment of a wide range of ailments such as : diarrhea, gastritis, peptic ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, hemorrhoids, cystitis, bronchitis, sinusitis, coughs, asthma and hay fever. The root also is said to be used as an anti-venom for rattlesnake bites.

I think I am going to start dehydrating this stuff.

I just had Alan try it as a salad and he likes it. I tried it. (I am not a salad person). It's ok. It really does not have much taste. I do not like the taste of iceberg lettuce at all. I can handle eating this.

I think this (dehydrated) will become another ingredient in my spaghetti sauce and stroganoff.
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Old 06-18-2012, 01:37 PM
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Great thread.

Not sure if this has been mentioned but St. John's Wort is another one that is easy to grow that is perennial. It is easily managed and hardy.

Yarrow needs lots of space and crowds out other plants. I had it near my oregano and chamomile and it almost destroyed both.

Lemon Balm, while wonderful and a great tea coupled with catnip and chamomile but it is as invasive as any of the mints. Just thought you may want to keep it in mind.

I let catnip grow almost anywhere it wants. It is a great at discouraging bugs and I love the smell as I work around the yard. It is easy to pull up and control.

You will love your herb garden and it will grow with you.
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