Corn Production Sets New Record - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Farming, Gardening & Homesteading Country lifestyle, homesteading, blacksmithing and living off the grid.

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Complete List Living off the Grid Grifters Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 150 10-16-2018 08:56 PM
Moving to Tonga to live on an uninhabited island. Kaizen Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 54 01-22-2018 12:42 AM
Chemistry #1 Skill to have in SHTF? katielyn Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 37 12-17-2017 02:07 AM
Know any good sources for Native farming techniques? AlphaSierraCharlie Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 98 12-06-2017 03:18 PM
How long can a person go on a restricted diet. lasers Food and water 45 09-12-2017 05:05 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-01-2018, 08:11 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,296
Thanks: 1,902
Thanked 3,081 Times in 975 Posts
Default Corn Production Sets New Record



Advertise Here

For the 4th year in a row corn production in the U.S.A. has set a new yield per acre record - 176.6 bushels.
"WASHINGTON, Jan. 12, 2018 – Across the Midwest, a lack of extreme heat helped boost the nation’s corn yield to its highest level on record – slightly above 2016. The nation’s soybean yield was down 6 percent from 2016, but production reached a record level due to record high acreage, according to the Crop Production 2017 Summary released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS)." https://www.nass.usda.gov/Newsroom/2018/01_12_2018.php
Quick reply to this message
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 02-01-2018, 08:34 AM
wtr100's Avatar
wtr100 wtr100 is offline
59840 - could fix a lot
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,809
Thanks: 787
Thanked 11,488 Times in 3,092 Posts
Default

but it's all GMO quick everyone run around in a panic ....
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to wtr100 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-01-2018, 12:06 PM
lasers lasers is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 2,450
Thanks: 26
Thanked 3,166 Times in 1,483 Posts
Default

Record production, near record low prices, and they can't find a place to sell it. Supposedly China is sitting on huge amounts of corn from last year and are not buying this years harvest, or at least that was the case in November.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to lasers For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-02-2018, 07:40 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,296
Thanks: 1,902
Thanked 3,081 Times in 975 Posts
Default

Attached is a 'snip' of a pdf I put together yesterday with data from here: http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/Mann...ocumentID=1593
The d/ls track historical crop production data from the late 19th century through 2016. In order to simplify things I picked a number of crops and tracked them from 1959 to 2016 at 3 year intervals. Production in individual years is of course primarily dependent on weather but the inexorable rise in yield over the decades is apparent and gratifying.
U.S. farmers do an incredible job of feeding a sizable portion of the World.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Crops2.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	43.4 KB
ID:	251833  
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 02-15-2018, 10:54 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,296
Thanks: 1,902
Thanked 3,081 Times in 975 Posts
Default

I put together another page of data for various crops this time including historic temp. and co2 levels.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Crops3.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	46.8 KB
ID:	254250  
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 02-18-2018, 12:14 PM
Dragonid's Avatar
Dragonid Dragonid is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Northern Great Plains
Posts: 5,626
Thanks: 12,568
Thanked 10,899 Times in 3,813 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Mjolnir View Post
I put together another page of data for various crops this time including historic temp. and co2 levels.
Car farts make the corn grow.

Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Dragonid For This Useful Post:
Old 02-18-2018, 01:51 PM
S610 S610 is offline
Cave canem
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Middle Georgia
Posts: 5,391
Thanks: 11,843
Thanked 11,121 Times in 3,865 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lasers View Post
Record production, near record low prices, and they can't find a place to sell it. Supposedly China is sitting on huge amounts of corn from last year and are not buying this years harvest, or at least that was the case in November.
Venezuela could use it, maybe trade corn for oil?

Oh wait! We don't like their government, best to let them starve.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to S610 For This Useful Post:
Old 02-18-2018, 02:05 PM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,296
Thanks: 1,902
Thanked 3,081 Times in 975 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lasers View Post
Record production, near record low prices, and they can't find a place to sell it. Supposedly China is sitting on huge amounts of corn from last year and are not buying this years harvest, or at least that was the case in November.
An additional side effect of China using up some of it's corn reserves is that imports of cassava, principally from Thailand, have been cut way back, to the detriment of the Thai economy.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 05-18-2018, 08:43 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,296
Thanks: 1,902
Thanked 3,081 Times in 975 Posts
Default

New research (March 29, 2018) from Michigan State University suggests that the old Cornbelt adage that, “On hot, humid nights you can almost hear the corn growing.”, may only be slightly apocryphal. The study by researchers Prof. Bruno Basso and his colleague Joe Ritchie suggests that “Our analysis, and that of other climate researchers, shows that the amount of water vapor in the air is gradually increasing in the summers because the daily low temperatures are getting gradually warmer, but the daily high temperatures are cooling – or staying the same – in many areas of the Midwest,” Basso said. “This causes more humidity and slightly decreases how much energy is used for evaporation.”
Calculating how much energy crops receive from the sun and how it is converted to evaporative loss from the crop, known as evapotranspiration, suggests that "while changes in temperatures and humidity trend as they have in the past 50 years, crop yields can not only survive – but thrive." https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2018/c...-through-2050/

"This paper describes the results of an analysis demonstrating that high yields in maize can be obtained without additional water under current and projected vapor pressure deficits. The objective of the study was to quantify evapotranspiration (ET) in high-yielding maize under current and projected vapor pressure deficits using the energy balance contrasted with the transpiration efficiency (TE) approach. This study indicates a lack of accuracy and bias in the TE approach when future crop water requirements were estimated. High maize yields are achievable using on average 700 mm of water as demonstrated by the current record maize grain yield of 34 Mg ha−1, which is ∼23 Mg ha−1 higher than the US average. These yields are achievable with approximately the same ET even under projected changes in vapor pressure deficit, through improved genetics and optimum agronomic management."
American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc. https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publ...les/3/1/170039
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 05-20-2018, 12:09 PM
barnetmill's Avatar
barnetmill barnetmill is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Western part of FL Panhandle
Posts: 2,705
Thanks: 7,295
Thanked 2,592 Times in 1,427 Posts
Default

Perhaps the cost of meat will go down if the price of corn base feed would also go down.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to barnetmill For This Useful Post:
Old 05-23-2018, 01:19 PM
InfScout's Avatar
InfScout InfScout is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northeast
Posts: 10,400
Thanks: 18,671
Thanked 33,288 Times in 8,051 Posts
Default

I have not planted corn here for a few years. There are so many farms that grow it in the area and it's cheap enough to buy. Plus I work part-time with a sort of crop share farm down the road and they grow it so I don't plant it anymore. I'm almost thinking not to have a garden at all. I can work a few hours a day there and get paid with fresh food and they grow everything I do. We even can together and it's easier doing that with a bigger crew.

And it's close enough, I can even ride my horse there so no gas is needed. About time the horse does something worthwhile.

But back to the OP, a good crop of corn is a good thing as would a big wheat crop.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to InfScout For This Useful Post:
Old 05-23-2018, 02:27 PM
Kansas Terri Kansas Terri is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 8,065
Thanks: 8,994
Thanked 14,414 Times in 5,444 Posts
Default

The scuttlebutt I am hearing is that the corn harvest will be much less this year. Many areas are just too dry.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Kansas Terri For This Useful Post:
Old 05-23-2018, 03:24 PM
ajole ajole is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 10,726
Thanks: 8,625
Thanked 24,937 Times in 7,769 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Terri View Post
The scuttlebutt I am hearing is that the corn harvest will be much less this year. Many areas are just too dry.
The question then is...will it be less, and how much less, than last year, or the average, or ten years aog.

And what will that do to consumer prices as oil and other farm costs go up?

Funny thing...as oil prices go up, there may be more demand for corn for ethanol, so the corn producers may cash out either way, if the timing is right. Of course, the middle man will get all the real money.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ajole For This Useful Post:
Old 05-25-2018, 07:51 AM
timesarechanging's Avatar
timesarechanging timesarechanging is offline
Likes freedom
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 129
Thanks: 567
Thanked 176 Times in 72 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ajole View Post
The question then is...will it be less, and how much less, than last year, or the average, or ten years aog.

And what will that do to consumer prices as oil and other farm costs go up?

Funny thing...as oil prices go up, there may be more demand for corn for ethanol, so the corn producers may cash out either way, if the timing is right. Of course, the middle man will get all the real money.
Considering that as of December 2017, the USDA was predicting corn at $3.20 for this year, and now it sits closer to $4.05 for July... I'd say things are looking good for farmers with contracts. The big question is, will it maintain the price, and will we have good weather to help with yields? That is a not insignificant spread of prices over the past 6 months.

I for one, would like to see the prices drop this year, but then again, I am in the market for additional land, and those high corn prices make it difficult to find affordable acreage :-)
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to timesarechanging For This Useful Post:
Old 11-19-2018, 06:41 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,296
Thanks: 1,902
Thanked 3,081 Times in 975 Posts
Default

"USDA Forecasts Record High Corn Yield and Soybean Production for 2018
WASHINGTON, August 10, 2018 – U.S. farmers are expected to produce a record-high soybean crop this year, according to the Crop Production report issued today by the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Up 4 percent from 2017, soybean production is forecast at record high 4.59 billion bushels, while corn growers are expected to decrease their production slightly from last year, forecast at 14.6 billion bushels... ...Average corn yield is forecast at 178.4 bushels per acre, up 1.8 bushels from last year. If realized, this will be the highest yield on record for the United States. ... ....Wheat production is forecast at 1.88 billion bushels, up 8 percent from 2017. Growers are expected to produce 1.19 billion bushels of winter wheat this year, down 6 percent from last year." https://www.nass.usda.gov/Newsroom/2018/08-10-2018.php
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Major Mjolnir For This Useful Post:
Old 11-19-2018, 08:42 PM
lasers lasers is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 2,450
Thanks: 26
Thanked 3,166 Times in 1,483 Posts
Default

Record numbers of cranberries produced this year as well. The problem is there are more cranberries than there is demand. It looks like farmers will be told to destroy 1/4 of their crop to keep prices up. The problem with record crop production is often the price then drops below what it costs to produce them.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to lasers For This Useful Post:
Old 11-19-2018, 09:27 PM
Sharkbait Sharkbait is offline
Harsh and unpleasant
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 1,884
Thanks: 5,661
Thanked 3,201 Times in 1,259 Posts
Default

Looks like those boys are growing themselves out of a job
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Sharkbait For This Useful Post:
Old 11-19-2018, 09:42 PM
Hoka-hey's Avatar
Hoka-hey Hoka-hey is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: South of the cheddar curtain
Posts: 591
Thanks: 345
Thanked 1,152 Times in 401 Posts
Default

If corn prices weren't so volatile I'd of had a corn stove by now. Was super interested when it was around $1.90 a bushel , not at all when the prices cranked up.
I remember when good land was going for $1200-$1600 an acre back in the day ( early 80's?), what's it now around 10k I think for prime Illinois soil.

Who mentioned cranberry's? Yeah they destroyed 25% of their crop so the growers could stay in business. Figure I will head up to the Warren area next year and buy in bulk.
Tough business farming is...knew a lot of folks in it yrs ago..many got out over the years.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Hoka-hey For This Useful Post:
Old 11-20-2018, 09:48 AM
barnetmill's Avatar
barnetmill barnetmill is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Western part of FL Panhandle
Posts: 2,705
Thanks: 7,295
Thanked 2,592 Times in 1,427 Posts
Default

Relative to the cranberries excess being destroyed something about that is very wrong. Destroying excess production is not new at all. Too bad the USDA can not give such things away to starving people world wide, but there are so many downsides to giving food to the starving it just will not be done in many cases.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to barnetmill For This Useful Post:
Old 11-20-2018, 05:59 PM
lasers lasers is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 2,450
Thanks: 26
Thanked 3,166 Times in 1,483 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoka-hey View Post

Who mentioned cranberry's? Yeah they destroyed 25% of their crop so the growers could stay in business. Figure I will head up to the Warren area next year and buy in bulk.
Tough business farming is...knew a lot of folks in it yrs ago..many got out over the years.
If you find someone willing to sell them to you in bulk at a reasonable price could you pm me the information on where you got it from? I need to head to Green Bay sometime soon and was thinking if I knew who to ask I would try and get some. I have picked wild cranberries before and if picked at the end of September they can be left on the kitchen shelf until after Christmas before they started to show signs they needed to be dealt with soon.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to lasers For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net