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Old 09-30-2010, 05:06 PM
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The downside to corn is that the niacin is bound up and not bioavailable unless you treat it with lime to make hominy out of it. That's a very fuel and labor intensive process. I love corn, but it would be a real pain to have as a staple food.

I'm not sure what my one crop would be. From a nutrition point of view, I'm tempted to say amaranth. It's easy to grow, pest resistant and extremely nutritious. Also, one of the few complete proteins of vegetable origin. But it's a hands on crop and would be hard to grow with machinery.

From a fuel point of view, I might lean more towards something that could be eaten or pressed for oil for cooking, lighting and making diesel. To me, diesel is a far more important fuel than gasoline, and one this country should have switched over too decades ago.
I had never even heard about amaranth until I read that Mike .... incredible.

Spent the last two days reading about it all over the web, ordered some, showed the info to me wife.

We're going to give it a try.

Thanks Mike.
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Old 09-30-2010, 05:35 PM
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If I had acreage, I would plant at least one early apple(Gala, gravenstien), late apple (winesap), Tart Cherry, sweet cherry, Peach, apricot, and a pear.

All of the fruit can be dried, canned or eaten raw. All of it comes in at diffent times of the year. I might even consider an Arkansa Black apple because it is the worlds hardest apple, maybe a red wealthy.
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Old 09-30-2010, 06:23 PM
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If I had acreage, I would plant at least one early apple(Gala, gravenstien), late apple (winesap), Tart Cherry, sweet cherry, Peach, apricot, and a pear.

All of the fruit can be dried, canned or eaten raw. All of it comes in at diffent times of the year. I might even consider an Arkansa Black apple because it is the worlds hardest apple, maybe a red wealthy.
We have 16 apples trees here.

Two groups, one for early harvest and one for late harvest.

50% of each group are varieties with super high sugar content, and two varieties of high acid trees.

We plan to produce shelf-stable cider.
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Old 09-30-2010, 06:59 PM
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We've never heard anything about apples having any luck below the fall line and the Mason -Dixon line. They just don't seem to like sand. Pears are pretty much the same way.

We have to stick with the citrus stuff, including peaches, kiwi, grapes, plums, etc.

Apples are only a couple of hundred miles away. I wish we could grow galas and granny smiths.
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Old 09-30-2010, 07:08 PM
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Any fruit tree that you like would work. We have a friend here that does good with peaches.

Peach wine Mmmm
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Old 09-30-2010, 07:56 PM
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as long as you had alot of water. If that were the case, many other folks would be moving on in.
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Old 10-01-2010, 12:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Gallo Pazzesco View Post
I had never even heard about amaranth until I read that Mike .... incredible.

Spent the last two days reading about it all over the web, ordered some, showed the info to me wife.

We're going to give it a try.

Thanks Mike.
Anytime. I grew it for the first time last summer and was really impressed by it. It immediately became my number one survival plant. I hope you have great success with yours too.
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Old 10-01-2010, 11:44 AM
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Heck Mike .... if it will grow where you are then hopefully it will grow where I am no problem. Lots of high heat and sand. We're sure going to give it a try.
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Old 10-01-2010, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Gallo Pazzesco View Post
Heck Mike .... if it will grow where you are then hopefully it will grow where I am no problem. Lots of high heat and sand. We're sure going to give it a try.
It's a staple crop for some of the Indians high up in the cold Andes mountains and such. I think it will grow pretty much anywhere. The soil where I grew mine was salty clay. It was the only plant that actually did extremely well. I just don't think it's very picky as long as you find the right variety. I only tried one kind, Vegetable Amaranth. There are probably others that would have done even better.
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Old 10-01-2010, 05:28 PM
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Cattails. Six thousand pounds of starch per acre, available year round (even if you have ice) few pests, needs no fertilizer, self-watering, nutritious, a green and a starch.
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Old 10-01-2010, 05:39 PM
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Cattails. Six thousand pounds of starch per acre, available year round (even if you have ice) few pests, needs no fertilizer, self-watering, nutritious, a green and a starch.
We actually discussed that.

Tried spreading seed too.

While we have some growing on my land; I have not been able to get any to germinate where I want it to grow.
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Old 10-01-2010, 09:59 PM
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....Cannabis good cash crop....
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Old 10-06-2010, 06:05 AM
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Most productive is corn. Easiest is potato. Depends on where you live!!!
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Old 10-06-2010, 06:40 AM
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I would think dandelions would make an excellent crop to plant and grow because it would be so well camouflaged. The roots can make a type of artificial coffee. You can make a type of wine from the plant. The leaves are edible in salads. And nobody else but a survivalist would see the plant as useful... I really think that we should adopt the dandelion as our survivalists' plant to represent us.
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Old 10-06-2010, 07:20 AM
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in east texas, I'm lookin at pear trees and citrus.....potatos for the starch.. we put in 1/2acre of red potatos a few years ago and got about a half-ton pickup truck bed FULL... very productive...I dont know about the bean crop in this area yet, but I'll find out before next year... and of course, tomatos
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Old 10-06-2010, 08:09 AM
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just like the old days, i will be a hemp farmer.

it has everything you need!!
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Old 10-06-2010, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
We actually discussed that.

Tried spreading seed too.

While we have some growing on my land; I have not been able to get any to germinate where I want it to grow.
Move roots in spring. Look for ones with a dog like tooth on them.
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Old 10-06-2010, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Herd Sniper View Post
I would think dandelions would make an excellent crop to plant and grow because it would be so well camouflaged. The roots can make a type of artificial coffee. You can make a type of wine from the plant. The leaves are edible in salads. And nobody else but a survivalist would see the plant as useful... I really think that we should adopt the dandelion as our survivalists' plant to represent us.
Wild greens are everywhere and may be 90 percent of what we forage. The problem with greens is they don't have much energy. For that you need starch or oil and that usually means roots or nuts.
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Old 10-06-2010, 10:09 PM
Luke 22:36 Luke 22:36 is offline
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I would say peanuts or beans or both.
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Old 10-07-2010, 02:53 AM
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I'm not much of a farmer, but I have to say that potatoes were extremely easy for me to cultivate as a novice. All I did was plant the little pieces that were growing stems and water them and they grew fairly quickly and without a whole lot of effort on my part. Not to mention that each plant yielded about 3-4 large potatoes.

I've even seen a couple of potato plants stemming/popping up around my compost pile because they really don't require a lot of work to grow, just give them some nice soil, a bit of water and plenty of sunshine and they seem to grow just fine! I also love potatoes! There's so many things you can do to make them taste good and still have diversity of taste. Potatoes are a miracle plant in my opinion

A secondary for me would be cucumbers, just because they grow so fast and they're easy to cultivate.
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