Accurate 223 / 5.56mm ammo? - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Military Weapons Forum AR15, AK47, SKS, H&K, Galil, CETME, FN/FAL, Tanks, Ships, Jets, Helicopters....

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-12-2020, 07:24 PM
Chuckleberry's Avatar
Chuckleberry Chuckleberry is offline
Limited Tolerance Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: NoDak
Posts: 4,588
Thanks: 6,017
Thanked 12,863 Times in 3,671 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

`

https://www.armystudyguide.com/conte...-of-mark.shtml

.

6. Cheek-to-Stock Weld. The stock weld
should provide a natural line of sight through the
center of the rear sight aperture to the front sight
post and on to the target. The firerís
neck should be relaxed, allowing his cheek to fall
naturally onto the stock. Through dry-fire training,
the soldier practices this position until he assumes
the same cheek-to-stock weld each time he assumes a
given position, which provides consistency in
aiming. Proper eye relief is obtained when a soldier
establishes a good cheek-to-stock weld. A small
change in eye relief normally occurs each time that
the firer assumes a different firing position. The
soldier should begin by trying to touch the charging
handle with his nose when assuming a firing
position. This will aid the soldier in maintaining
the same cheek-to-stock weld hold each time the
weapon is aimed. The soldier should be mindful of
how the nose touches the charging handle and should
be consistent when doing so. This should be
critiqued and reinforced during dry-fire training
.

.



From Army FM 3-22.9 page 4-18

4-41.Through dry-fire training, the Soldier practices this position until he assumes the same cheek-to-stock weld each time he assumes a given position, which provides consistency in aiming. To learn to maintain the same cheek-to-stock weld each time the weapon is aimed, the Soldier should begin by trying to touch the charging handle with his nose when assuming a firing position. The Soldier should be mindful of how the nose touches the charging handle and should be consistent when doing so. This position should be critiqued and reinforced during dry-fire training.

.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	- FM 3-22.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	44.1 KB
ID:	296036  
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Chuckleberry For This Useful Post:
Old 01-12-2020, 08:43 PM
SCPigpen's Avatar
SCPigpen SCPigpen is offline
Shade Tree Gynecologist
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Down South
Posts: 3,675
Thanks: 891
Thanked 6,881 Times in 2,327 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckleberry View Post
`

https://www.armystudyguide.com/conte...-of-mark.shtml

.

6. Cheek-to-Stock Weld. The stock weld
should provide a natural line of sight through the
center of the rear sight aperture to the front sight
post and on to the target. The firerís
neck should be relaxed, allowing his cheek to fall
naturally onto the stock. Through dry-fire training,
the soldier practices this position until he assumes
the same cheek-to-stock weld each time he assumes a
given position, which provides consistency in
aiming. Proper eye relief is obtained when a soldier
establishes a good cheek-to-stock weld. A small
change in eye relief normally occurs each time that
the firer assumes a different firing position. The
soldier should begin by trying to touch the charging
handle with his nose when assuming a firing
position. This will aid the soldier in maintaining
the same cheek-to-stock weld hold each time the
weapon is aimed. The soldier should be mindful of
how the nose touches the charging handle and should
be consistent when doing so. This should be
critiqued and reinforced during dry-fire training
.

.



From Army FM 3-22.9 page 4-18

4-41.Through dry-fire training, the Soldier practices this position until he assumes the same cheek-to-stock weld each time he assumes a given position, which provides consistency in aiming. To learn to maintain the same cheek-to-stock weld each time the weapon is aimed, the Soldier should begin by trying to touch the charging handle with his nose when assuming a firing position. The Soldier should be mindful of how the nose touches the charging handle and should be consistent when doing so. This position should be critiqued and reinforced during dry-fire training.

.
Im a Marine so does this still apply?
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to SCPigpen For This Useful Post:
Old 01-13-2020, 12:57 AM
IamZeke's Avatar
IamZeke IamZeke is offline
Beer Truck Door Gunner
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 28,006
Thanks: 31,509
Thanked 58,560 Times in 20,268 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCPigpen View Post
Im a Marine so does this still apply?
They taught that same cheek weld to me on A1's at Pendleton as well.

But we never needed a stinkin' manual. We had range officers from hell instead.
__________________
Need more info? Try this:

Search using Google, type "site:survivalistboards.com" in Google's search box, followed by the search parameters. You can use all normal conventions, limit searches by date, etc. Works quite well and beats the native search function.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to IamZeke For This Useful Post:
Old 01-13-2020, 05:12 PM
Inazone's Avatar
Inazone Inazone is offline
Fenced In
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bloomington, MN
Posts: 3,138
Thanks: 1,270
Thanked 4,241 Times in 1,842 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
Just ordered:

Hornady BLACK Ammunition 223 Remington 62 Grain Full Metal Jacket Box of 20

Federal Varmint Ammunition 223 Remington 53 Grain Hornady V-MAX Box of 20

Browning BXV Varmint Expansion Ammunition 223 Remington 50 Grain Polymer Tip Rapid Expansion Box of 20
I respect your efforts to find ammo that runs well in your gun, but I hope you shopped around to find decent prices, considering what you ordered! Seriously, you might want to consider comparing particular brands of ammo that are available in different weights. For instance, Prvi Partisan/PPU, Frontier and Armscor are three brands that come to mind, offering FMJ in both 55gr and 62gr. Prvi Partisan and Frontier also have heavier (68gr+) BTHP/OTM varieties. Wolf Gold and PMC are inexpensive 55gr options.

This is all based on plinking and training purposes. If you plan on this AR being a defensive and/or hunting gun, SP ammo may be the more appropriate choice, with a lot of folks opting for the heaviest bullet that their gun will fire accurately and reliably. The brands I mentioned usually have something to fit the bill in that regard.

As a side note, I understand why you (kev) would run the cantilever mount "backwards" compared to how most folks do it. My vision and my lens prescription do me no favors when it comes to optics, and I struggle to get the right eye relief. Depending on the exact gun and optic, I either have to ditch the rear iron sight or adjust my scope placement. There is a reason some people use regular scope rings and others use cantilever mounts. But I think it would be worth $20 and a few minutes to get a laser bore sighter to make sure you're not dealing with some other issue pertaining to your scope, mount, etc.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Inazone For This Useful Post:
Old 01-13-2020, 06:52 PM
Klbsa Klbsa is offline
Adventurer
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 694
Thanks: 111
Thanked 1,382 Times in 421 Posts
Default

I have REALLY good results with cheap 55 grain Wolf Polyformance 5.56...... The .223 not so much (but its reliable and accuracy is not bad or anything). But then again 55 grain Federal FMJ 5.56 drives tacks for me too.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Klbsa For This Useful Post:
Old 01-18-2020, 08:58 AM
Vodka Wizard's Avatar
Vodka Wizard Vodka Wizard is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 387
Thanks: 227
Thanked 611 Times in 263 Posts
Default

Step One: Go to your local sporting goods / farm store / gun shop
Step Two: Buy one box of anything 62gr and over.
Step Three: Group them all
Step Four: Measure the groups and identify the tightest one.
Step Five: Continue to buy that load.

If you're not a ballistician or sniper, don't worry yourself with little details. KISS.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Vodka Wizard For This Useful Post:
Old 01-18-2020, 10:53 AM
0002S's Avatar
0002S 0002S is offline
μολὼν λαβέ
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: The stars at night are big and
Posts: 3,112
Thanks: 2,413
Thanked 4,271 Times in 1,751 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardcalibres View Post
Kevin

Your scope mount is a cantilever type and you have it mounted backwards. Consequently your scope is mounted too far back, the ocular (rear) lens is too far back and your eye relief is too small.
Iíd fix this ^ and test before you go through a huge ammo testing exercise.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to 0002S For This Useful Post:
Old 01-20-2020, 04:29 AM
Unobtanium's Avatar
Unobtanium Unobtanium is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: NW,AR
Age: 34
Posts: 9,978
Thanks: 4,283
Thanked 9,094 Times in 4,496 Posts
Default

Accuracy...the AR is easy to mess up. Many people neglect to tend the details.

I would look for what's wrong with your scope/mount/rifle combo first.

Often times mounts will be shifting, optics not holding zero, etc. PSA barrel nut torque is also suspect. In short...


...quality mount from Badger, NF, etc. Torqued correctly to optic and upper?
...quality optic from Nightforce, TT, or on the economical end, SWFA HD series will be mechanically sound.
...verify reciever face trueness.
...verify barrel nut torque
...verify headspacing of bolt
...verify gas block is not interacting with rail


From here we get more in depth...

...is the bore uniform diameter? Is the throat and lead free of excessive irregularly? Is the chamber cut concentric to the bore? Does the barrel have internal stresses that were not properly relieved? Is the twist consistent?

Then...and only then...can we begin to look to the ammo without chasing our tail. There are other things, as well, to inspect, but the above is the meat of it.

Think of it like a crate engine that you've installed in a vehicle that isnt running the predicted 1/4 mile et and trap speed. Do you start by looking at whether Exxon vs Shell or what brand of oil is in the crank case caused this....or do you start looking at the vehicle?
Quick reply to this message
Old 01-20-2020, 04:41 AM
Unobtanium's Avatar
Unobtanium Unobtanium is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: NW,AR
Age: 34
Posts: 9,978
Thanks: 4,283
Thanked 9,094 Times in 4,496 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardcalibres View Post
Your rifle, your call Kev.

But the horizontal stringing you saw in groups could be caused by that reduced eye relief (and consequent inconsistent parallax) combined with suboptimal cheek weld (caused by your head up posture). Reduced eye relief can be quite risky if you have to shoot your rifle prone or around some obstacle - you can get "scoped" when the back end of the scope hits your eye socket (not fun).

If you google "cantilever AR mount images" you will see hundreds of different AR scope mounts similar to yours that are mounted the opposite way around to the way you have it. Also note in those images that the ocular lens (ie rear end) of the scopes on ARs are usually level with the charging handle or up to at most about an inch to the rear of the charging handle.

All those manufacturers of scope mounts who have posted images of their mounts holding scopes on to ARs must know a thing or two.....

Your backup rear sight can either be replaced with a lower profile one or just stored with the tools your would need to remove the scope. That scope working the best it can will always be higher priority than the backup irons.
I have also seen horizontal stringing because someone likes to clean a lot. The bore will string horizontal until it fouls in. Various barrels take various amounts.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Unobtanium For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
233 remington, coyote hunting, shtf survival rifle, target shooting



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net