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Old 06-18-2019, 01:19 AM
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The reality is that even if an author knows a lot about surviving in a PAW, they probably should not create characters who do, because normal non-prepper readers cannot/do not relate as well to those characters
Indeed. The books where the former marine wins the lottery the day after god tells him that the world will end in one year get pretty boring.
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Old 06-18-2019, 06:22 PM
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The movie, "The Road" does an awful job of portraying the book. The mother is vaguely referred to in the book whereas the movie features a performance by a popular actress with lines. That's Hollywood.

The book has clues written between the lines as when, where and the time frame of the story.

The Man lives in or near Chicago with his pregnant wife when the "event" takes place.

The Man later delivers his son wearing yellow kitchen gloves and using kitchen shears to cut the umbilical cord after society has collapsed.

The Man is somewhat resourceful - he realizes to gather water as soon as the event takes place. He knows how to deliver a baby, gather firewood and scavenge for food for a full ten plus years after the event.

Long after the wife is dead, the Man admits that the winters have gotten too cold to survive another year so he migrates with the Boy to the south.

We know the Man travels southeast because he goes through Tennessee where he grew up.

The book documents several months of travel. The Man is very adept at finding food and supplies. The cart in the beginning contains store food including nearly rancid rice and beans, hot chocolate packets, canned goods, a plastic bottle of syrup and ingredients to make primitive pancakes. Later he finds a ham in an abandoned smoke house, a single can of Coke, corn meal (with weevils), wild mushrooms, Kool-Aid, clean water, dehydrated apples and of course the shelter that was very well hidden. He also carries back up food in his back pack and coat in the event they lose the cart.

The Man is good with repair, reuse and recycle as well as medicine (some hypothesize that he was a doctor before the event). He repairs the grocery cart, makes a lamp by recycling old motor oil, performs surgery on himself, considers re-engineering 30-30 cartridges into .38 rounds and hacks various things to keep him and the Boy alive.

The Boy is an example of a child who has grown up without any other human contact save his father and briefly, his mother. He has under developed socialization skills and limited intelligence acquired under austere conditions. Regardless, most of us are annoyed to no end by the Boy.

The book has far more detail about what the Man and Boy found in the shelter. Most of it was food, boxes of clothing and books all of which the man goes through with a fine tooth comb looking for anything which will keep them alive.

The boat they salvage towards the end of the book contained more than the flare gun. There was also food and badly needed medical supplies. The Man spends hours finding hidden supplies and is away long enough for the Boy to be robbed.

Its implied the Man is sick the entire book. He coughs constantly, has hallucinations and admits he is feverish. The movie leaves out that the Man and Boy wear different types of face coverings the entire book to keep ash out of their lungs.

The Road is a fair survivalist story but a very well written story about love and the role of a father in a horrible world.
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Old 06-18-2019, 06:49 PM
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The Road was an immensely depressing movie. I cannot fathom the real deal.

Whatever the cause, assuming the events in The Road, why would you even want to survive? If you recall, there's some very dark graphic nightmarish themes. I don't want to give up spoilers but suffice it to say humanity and compassion are long-gone, no joy in life, and suicide is a major theme. The world is in literal decayed ruins and there is loneliness, sorrow, fear, suffering, and emotional anguish at every turn. It's a literal nightmare and one of the few excellent films that I just refuse to watch because it's so ultra depressing.

I live to have joy and hope. Without that, what's the bother?
Everything by Cormack McCarthy is depressing.
He is not an optimist.
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Old 06-20-2019, 08:17 PM
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The Rover is an example of a much more practical movie for survivalists than The Road.

It's kind of like if you start out in life thinking your sport is baseball, but then a few years later, find out it's really basketball, or vice versa--

--Imagining scenarios like meteor scenarios is what gets you to become a survivalist, but after you've been doing it for a while, you realize that what you're doing is more fitted for a much softer type of scenario.

It seems like so far there's a little bit that's useful in all apocalypse fiction, though.
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Old 06-21-2019, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Sharkbait View Post
Everything by Cormack McCarthy is depressing.
He is not an optimist.
"Optimism is cowardice!!" - Oswald Spengler.
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Old 06-21-2019, 02:32 PM
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I read the book back in 2006 or so and it was a real shock of a book. it was depressing throughout and dark, with only the tiniest glimmer of light after tragedy at the end. looking back now, it hits me even harder since i had kids. scary as hell. the idea that i would die and have to entrust my son to strangers, or even the possibility of him being alone. terrifying.

the movie followed the book pretty closely.

being alone on the road in a devastated environment presents exactly the kinds of challenges you'd expect and i think the author did a good job of showing how bleak the prospects for people would be trying to bug out on the road without resupply. you run out, then you're done.

in the scenario shown in that movie, it's not about outlasting other humans competing for resources. it's about outlasting the disaster itself. 5 years is a long time when you're prepping. for a family of 4 you're talking, give or take, 5 gallon buckets stacked in a 9x9x3 LxWxH deep. to say nothing of the other supplies you'd need for a 5-year shutin without even the ability to forage for anything meaningful. i kind of figure God will call an end to the whole thing before it gets that bad.
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Old 06-21-2019, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by merlinfire View Post

in the scenario shown in that movie, it's not about outlasting other humans competing for resources. it's about outlasting the disaster itself. 5 years is a long time when you're prepping. for a family of 4 you're talking, give or take, 5 gallon buckets stacked in a 9x9x3 LxWxH deep. to say nothing of the other supplies you'd need for a 5-year shutin without even the ability to forage for anything meaningful. i kind of figure God will call an end to the whole thing before it gets that bad.
TO QUOTE a famous intergalactic independent...

Capt. Malcolm Reynolds: Ah heck, Shepherd, I ain't looking for help from on high. That's a long wait for a train don't come.

Divine intervention... the belief may result in good stuff in the after life... but betting on it on Earth could be a painful process. Could be "that time" could be a test like Job... one just never knows.
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Old 06-21-2019, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim from 28DaysLater View Post
The Rover is an example of a much more practical movie for survivalists than The Road.

It's kind of like if you start out in life thinking your sport is baseball, but then a few years later, find out it's really basketball, or vice versa--

--Imagining scenarios like meteor scenarios is what gets you to become a survivalist, but after you've been doing it for a while, you realize that what you're doing is more fitted for a much softer type of scenario.

It seems like so far there's a little bit that's useful in all apocalypse fiction, though.
Just when I think I have seen all the dystopian post-apocalyptic movies I see a new one - the Rover.

I likely will see it online in a few days. Like I need more motivation to move off grid permanently to my WY mtn retreat.

Looks like the Rover is yet another Australian gloomy movie which might be great for some of us anyway to see.

I am wondering if the writers and movie producers really believe any of this or just are using the post-apocalyptic genre as people made Western movies so many years ago?

I first just watch for any entertainment value and how on or usually how off they are when it comes to showing survival and such...

I like some ideas better than others though. I also like movies where cities get destroyed not to see millions suffer but because it is easier to believe and cities are easy targets. This might explain a bit better. If people are born and raised in a city then they think and feel much differently than those who were born and raised in the country or a small town. So like or hate this; your choice >

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Old 06-21-2019, 09:57 PM
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YOU Got that right.

I don't have your mountains,
BUT
this is a view from the kitchen window this past spring.

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Old 06-25-2019, 09:18 PM
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Originally Posted by comdot View Post
The movie, "The Road" does an awful job of portraying the book. The mother is vaguely referred to in the book whereas the movie features a performance by a popular actress with lines. That's Hollywood.

The book has clues written between the lines as when, where and the time frame of the story.

The Man lives in or near Chicago with his pregnant wife when the "event" takes place.

The Man later delivers his son wearing yellow kitchen gloves and using kitchen shears to cut the umbilical cord after society has collapsed.

The Man is somewhat resourceful - he realizes to gather water as soon as the event takes place. He knows how to deliver a baby, gather firewood and scavenge for food for a full ten plus years after the event.

Long after the wife is dead, the Man admits that the winters have gotten too cold to survive another year so he migrates with the Boy to the south.

We know the Man travels southeast because he goes through Tennessee where he grew up.

The book documents several months of travel. The Man is very adept at finding food and supplies. The cart in the beginning contains store food including nearly rancid rice and beans, hot chocolate packets, canned goods, a plastic bottle of syrup and ingredients to make primitive pancakes. Later he finds a ham in an abandoned smoke house, a single can of Coke, corn meal (with weevils), wild mushrooms, Kool-Aid, clean water, dehydrated apples and of course the shelter that was very well hidden. He also carries back up food in his back pack and coat in the event they lose the cart.

The Man is good with repair, reuse and recycle as well as medicine (some hypothesize that he was a doctor before the event). He repairs the grocery cart, makes a lamp by recycling old motor oil, performs surgery on himself, considers re-engineering 30-30 cartridges into .38 rounds and hacks various things to keep him and the Boy alive.

The Boy is an example of a child who has grown up without any other human contact save his father and briefly, his mother. He has under developed socialization skills and limited intelligence acquired under austere conditions. Regardless, most of us are annoyed to no end by the Boy.

The book has far more detail about what the Man and Boy found in the shelter. Most of it was food, boxes of clothing and books all of which the man goes through with a fine tooth comb looking for anything which will keep them alive.

The boat they salvage towards the end of the book contained more than the flare gun. There was also food and badly needed medical supplies. The Man spends hours finding hidden supplies and is away long enough for the Boy to be robbed.

Its implied the Man is sick the entire book. He coughs constantly, has hallucinations and admits he is feverish. The movie leaves out that the Man and Boy wear different types of face coverings the entire book to keep ash out of their lungs.

The Road is a fair survivalist story but a very well written story about love and the role of a father in a horrible world.
Thank you for this. If you focus on this story as a "survivalist" story it is bleak and depressing. If you focus on the relationship between the father and son, and what the father does despite the surroundings it is a rather beautiful story.
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Old 06-25-2019, 10:49 PM
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Thoughts of "Why go on?", "What's the point?", or "What about PTSD?" are simply weak sauce mantras. Self fulfilling prophecies. I can't even fathom such rot.

You suck it up and do the best you can. Stick it out until your very last breath. You refuse to quit, even in the face of certain death. And you rally every last bit of fight left in you to protect others. Whether your loved ones... or total strangers. Altruism. It's a moral and genetic imperative. If you don't viscerally understand that concept, deep down inside...you're not fully alive.

In the novel, the father understood his Purpose on Earth. Ensuring his son's survival. Not his own.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:59 AM
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Thoughts of "Why go on?", "What's the point?", or "What about PTSD?" are simply weak sauce mantras. Self fulfilling prophecies. I can't even fathom such rot.

You suck it up and do the best you can. Stick it out until your very last breath. You refuse to quit, even in the face of certain death. And you rally every last bit of fight left in you to protect others. Whether your loved ones... or total strangers. Altruism. It's a moral and genetic imperative. If you don't viscerally understand that concept, deep down inside...you're not fully alive.

In the novel, the father understood his Purpose on Earth. Ensuring his son's survival. Not his own.
yep, and if you remember the story, the reason he's having to do it alone is because his wife basically decided "not to go on" and committed suicide.

man, the book is even more chilling and scary than the movie. if you have kids and the book doesn't light a fire under you to prepare for the sake of your kids i don't know what would!
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Old 06-26-2019, 09:52 AM
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This.

The Road illustrates what awaits those who are completely oblivious to SHTF possibilities, yet likely 95% of these people saw the movie/book as simply another in the post-apocalyptic genre... and that's it.

For them, it was just entertainment.
I found it so realistic and frightening, all the survivalist longing for the events need to watch it. I sure pray our fears are never realized.

I've done survival, I like the leisure life so many of us have enjoyed for so long and some take for granted.
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Old 06-26-2019, 10:20 AM
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I found it so realistic and frightening, all the survivalist longing for the events need to watch it. I sure pray our fears are never realized.

I've done survival, I like the leisure life so many of us have enjoyed for so long and some take for granted.
yeah. the scenarios there had the "ring of truth", less fantasy, more dark reality. and man, reality can be dark. you can try to ignore it, but it will not ignore you.
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Old 06-26-2019, 11:35 AM
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it was a really dark movie for sure. The thing that most of us have that they didn't is more ammo. How did they get down to only 1 bullet which they implied it was for them putting themselves out of misery which the mother simply committed suicide by leaving. It seems like they were the type that only had a box or 2 of ammo. We would need a cart by itself to simply hold our ammo and guns, lol.

The movie was really good as far as showing a father's love for his son and wanting to do anything to protect him...that was his job, period. When he died it brought a tear to my eye thinking of what the son was feeling and would have to go through by himself.
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Old 06-26-2019, 01:26 PM
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it was a really dark movie for sure. The thing that most of us have that they didn't is more ammo. How did they get down to only 1 bullet which they implied it was for them putting themselves out of misery which the mother simply committed suicide by leaving. It seems like they were the type that only had a box or 2 of ammo. We would need a cart by itself to simply hold our ammo and guns, lol.

The movie was really good as far as showing a father's love for his son and wanting to do anything to protect him...that was his job, period. When he died it brought a tear to my eye thinking of what the son was feeling and would have to go through by himself.
I believe in the book they where in the house for 12+ years after the event.

See how much ammo you have after that.
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Old 06-26-2019, 02:21 PM
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I believe in the book they where in the house for 12+ years after the event.

See how much ammo you have after that.
in that scenario, where most people are wiped out at the beginning, and people are sparsely located, horrible cold weather, nothing much to be gained from venturing too far away from your house unless you have too, not many animals to hunt, etc. I would assume out of the 25 or so guns I "used" to own and 20,000 rounds of ammo I "used" to have that I would probably have around 19,900 rounds or so and 25 guns, not just 1 revolver. The 100 rounds would be if at the beginning there were a few animals to hunt, or the occasional person to fend off. Why, were you going to target shoot everyday and fend off 1000 people gangs in the scenario that this book is based on?
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Old 06-26-2019, 03:47 PM
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Thoughts of "Why go on?", "What's the point?", or "What about PTSD?" are simply weak sauce mantras. Self fulfilling prophecies. I can't even fathom such rot.

You suck it up and do the best you can. Stick it out until your very last breath. You refuse to quit, even in the face of certain death. And you rally every last bit of fight left in you to protect others. Whether your loved ones... or total strangers. Altruism. It's a moral and genetic imperative. If you don't viscerally understand that concept, deep down inside...you're not fully alive.

In the novel, the father understood his Purpose on Earth. Ensuring his son's survival. Not his own.
AGREED..
I simply cannot fathom the idea of quitting or taking the quick way out. I have never even considered that I could be killed or die.
I have probably been in more life or death situation than the average person.
If I had quit in any of them I would have died.

One of the ones that really sticks to mind 45 years after the event. I was trying to get control of a suspect who just come out of a store in a B&E, He was close enough to grab so I did and the fight was on. As we were going at it he reached down and managed to get my gun out of the holster, just as I became aware of it. It was like a scene from a bad "B" movie, the cop and the BG wrestling for the gun(.357,4" Colt Python, my own) with it between us as were were on the ground in a parking lot and him screaming he is going to kill me. Obviously, he didn't and also I didn't kill him(something I shall always regret for what he did later in life). I got the gun away and finally subdued the guy without firing a shot.
But
the idea of even remotely thinking I wasn't going to make it never ever crossed my mind.

I could no more consider suicide than I could decide to voluntarily stop breathing. I worked too hard to get to this point in life to just give it up because things get a little tough.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:05 PM
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in that scenario, where most people are wiped out at the beginning, and people are sparsely located, horrible cold weather, nothing much to be gained from venturing too far away from your house unless you have too, not many animals to hunt, etc. I would assume out of the 25 or so guns I "used" to own and 20,000 rounds of ammo I "used" to have that I would probably have around 19,900 rounds or so and 25 guns, not just 1 revolver. The 100 rounds would be if at the beginning there were a few animals to hunt, or the occasional person to fend off. Why, were you going to target shoot everyday and fend off 1000 people gangs in the scenario that this book is based on?
I don't think using yourself, or people generally on this board, for the 'average' ammo in any given home is the best case.

I'd wager that most people, other than 22LR, only have a few boxes kicking around. While I prefer to count, as you probably do, by the case, it just isn't that common. Add in that a lot of people may have to change locations or get trapped away from home in the 1st place. You aren't going to be able to carry 20K rounds with you either.

On the flip side, end up being in the wrong neighborhood when things go sideways, and 20K rounds doesn't sound like much. If you are 'the guy' that has it, and you need to use it, to train and protect a decent size group, it will go really fast.....
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Old 06-27-2019, 07:52 AM
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I don't think using yourself, or people generally on this board, for the 'average' ammo in any given home is the best case.

.
I HAVE one friend in particular who is an avid shooter, and he literally starts to panic when he gets below 100,000 rounds of .22LR
For his MBRs he keeps lots more. He is in his late 60s now and we joke about how he can't live long enough to shoot up all his ammo he has now. He probably has 2.5-3 million rounds in his back building. One of those folks who will run out of food long before he could ever run out of ammo.

NOT a prepper at all, just likes to shoot and likes his guns and ammo.
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