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Old 06-09-2019, 10:15 AM
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I picked up a small wood stove at an estate sale. It's in great condition and appears to not have been used much.

The brand is Sears Roebuck and it was made in Canada. It's small in size and has a single lid. The inside of the burn chamber measures about 14" in diameter.

I am having trouble finding a stove to pipe adapter (boot) and not sure what diameter I should use. I was thinking 6 inch??

The flange on the top of the stove is oval and measures 8 x 3 3/8 inches. There are many sizes out there but none are exact. Is there a round size that I can bend to fit?

The intended use is my ice fishing shack about 10' x 10'

Thanks for any help or links to an adapter.
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Old 06-09-2019, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportShot View Post
I picked up a small wood stove at an estate sale. It's in great condition and appears to not have been used much.

The brand is Sears Roebuck and it was made in Canada. It's small in size and has a single lid. The inside of the burn chamber measures about 14" in diameter.

I am having trouble finding a stove to pipe adapter (boot) and not sure what diameter I should use. I was thinking 6 inch??

The flange on the top of the stove is oval and measures 8 x 3 3/8 inches. There are many sizes out there but none are exact. Is there a round size that I can bend to fit?

The intended use is my ice fishing shack about 10' x 10'

Thanks for any help or links to an adapter.
stove pipe is usually 6 inch, it should deflect and fit. some stove shops carry adapters so you can go 6in to 8 in etc
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Old 06-09-2019, 12:07 PM
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A_SonofLiberty A_SonofLiberty is offline
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Get the closest adapter you can find and then take that to your local custom exhaust shop and have them swage it to fit. You can also buy a pipe swage. They sell them at harbor freight, but I can't find it on the website. I found one on Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/TruePower-21-...WM9C1H02BE77K2

That one is too small, but harbor freight sells one in the automotive section that should work for you.

Mine looks like this, but is meant for heavy duty trucks so is still larger
https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-32750-T...Y4A2R7Y8KME1E3
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Old 06-09-2019, 12:28 PM
Snyper708 Snyper708 is offline
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A 6 inch adapter would be right for the volume of the stove.

The stove pipe should fit inside the adapter, and each section of pipe fits into the one below.
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Old 06-09-2019, 03:19 PM
Don H Don H is offline
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Stove pipe should go INTO the stove pipe flange, not outside. My Fisher Baby Bear needs an adapter to make that connection since the crimped end of a 6" stove pipe is too big to fit in.
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Old 06-09-2019, 04:15 PM
bugbor bugbor is offline
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Seems to me that on one set up we used an old metal coffee can with a pot bellied stove. Would've been 40 years ago or more, so it could be that my memory's playin' tricks on me.
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Old 06-09-2019, 04:24 PM
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I checked an ellipse calculator and 6" diameter pipe should be correct. Just squeeze the section out of round to fit inside the flange. Stainless steel single wall pipe would be my choice.
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Old 06-09-2019, 05:10 PM
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Charlie is probably right. Just use a flexable tape and measure the CIRCUMFERENCE of 6" pipe and the oval of the stove. If they are pretty close it was intended to just squeeze a 6"pipe top fit.
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Old 06-10-2019, 11:34 AM
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NorthlineExpress is the company I mailordered my pipe from, and I think they will have everything you need.

https://www.northlineexpress.com/chi...tove-pipe.html

Please be aware that there are very many pipe choices and you need to know what you are buying.

First, and very importantly, there's stove pipe, and there's chimney pipe. Stove pipe is either single or double wall and is what is connected directly to the exhaust port of your stove. I bought both round and oval stove pipe connectors for my two stoves.

Chimney pipe is either double or triple wall, and is what is needed wherever the pipe passes through a wood structure such as the ceiling or roof. The general rule of thumb is that once the chimney pipe starts, it stays chimney pipe till you reach the outside peak.

Why the difference? Stove pipe has either an 18" clearance or a 6" clearance from any combustable material, ie the kitchen wall. Chimney pipe has either 6" or 2" clearances. Typically, only triple wall pipe can pass through standard 16" framing, because that's all that would fit.

I can tell you that triple wall pipe is conforting! I can press my cheek against the side of the pipe 6' above the burning stove, and not get hurt. That's how well insulated triple wall pipe is. If you ever have a chimney fire, triple wall might be the only thing that keeps your cabin from burning down.

The irony is that you fill find yourself spending hundreds of dollars to plumb your inexpensive stove. Myself, I have 800$ worth of pipe on top of a 125$ stove.
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Old 06-19-2019, 08:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportShot View Post
I picked up a small wood stove at an estate sale. It's in great condition and appears to not have been used much.

The brand is Sears Roebuck and it was made in Canada. It's small in size and has a single lid. The inside of the burn chamber measures about 14" in diameter.

I am having trouble finding a stove to pipe adapter (boot) and not sure what diameter I should use. I was thinking 6 inch??

The flange on the top of the stove is oval and measures 8 x 3 3/8 inches. There are many sizes out there but none are exact. Is there a round size that I can bend to fit?

The intended use is my ice fishing shack about 10' x 10'

Thanks for any help or links to an adapter.
Russ at Ginger Creek Antique stoves did have several odd size adapters, if you canít find one.
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Old 06-21-2019, 07:46 AM
CaffeineBuzz CaffeineBuzz is online now
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Olympia Chimney Supply in Scranton, PA makes custom oval/rectangle to round adapters.

They are very reasonably priced, and their custom shop turn around time is quick.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:37 PM
GKII GKII is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelK View Post
I can tell you that triple wall pipe is conforting! I can press my cheek against the side of the pipe 6' above the burning stove, and not get hurt. That's how well insulated triple wall pipe is. If you ever have a chimney fire, triple wall might be the only thing that keeps your cabin from burning down.

The irony is that you fill find yourself spending hundreds of dollars to plumb your inexpensive stove. Myself, I have 800$ worth of pipe on top of a 125$ stove.
I was extremely lucky a few years ago when I found 10 3' sections of used triple wall and the matching cap at a thrift store for $100. Most sections had minor dents and one had a major dent with one unusable, all together a GREAT deal!
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Old 06-23-2019, 05:34 AM
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I doubt Sport Shot intends to heat a house with such a small stove, more likely a tent or one room cabin where runs of triple wall pipe would not be appropriate. Small tin stoves wouldn't last long if used continually.

Even use as an emergency heat source in a larger building would probably be best done by running plain stove pipe out through a window, or even a hole cut through a wall. The only concern there is to have plenty of good heat shielding on the walls behind the stove and pipe, both inside and out, and of course a good safe thimble through the wall. Also have the pipe run high enough above the roof. The thimble could probably be found in an old fashoned hardware store or farm store. I see this as a use only in emergency thing where you have a plan and the parts stashed but not in use. GOOD IDEA.
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snyper708 View Post
A 6 inch adapter would be right for the volume of the stove.

The stove pipe should fit inside the adapter, and each section of pipe fits into the one below.
So the above section fits into the one below it?

The may sound stupid but I was kinda thinking it was like vehicle exhaust and put together the opposite of what you are saying. The reason being is wouldn't the smoke tend to want to leak out as it rises. If the upper section was outside the lower section, that wouldn't be possible. I'll take your word for it though.


I have a 30' travel trailer parked more or less, permanently, on some property. I removed the jack-knife sofa because it was never used anyway. I have an area about 6' wide by 4' deep to place the stove.

I have stone tiles covering the floor where the stove will sit. I still need to install a reflective surface along the wall behind it. I also will need to cut the hole in the ceiling. I have a heating cooling friend that will help me out with that when the time comes. Still have to remove some cupboards from above the area so yeah, this is a project and I hope to have it done by fall.

Its intended purpose is to provide enough heat to make it comfortable for a few overnight stays when the temps start to dip into the 20'sF. Just to take the chill out. Besides, travel trailers in general are not insulated well and it can get to 90 deg near the ceiling while being 40 deg near the floor. It will not be used often.

As far as towing the trailer and weight issues...I don't tow it often. About once every year or two and never more than a few miles to a dumping station at a public camp ground. The top part of stack above the roof will simply remove and I will fab up a brace to keep the stove from tipping or moving.

I was considering running the stack out the window with a 90 sideways and then another 90 upwards after its outside but...from what I understand, the bends can restrict how easily the smoke goes out and not pour into the interior when the door is opened.

The old propane furnace was located under the sofa so there is a vent near to provide air if needed.

It's intended to provide some heat and be safe.
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Old 06-24-2019, 10:25 AM
eyepal eyepal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportShot View Post
The flange on the top of the stove is oval and measures 8 x 3 3/8 inches. There are many sizes out there but none are exact.
Check Midland Hardware for an 8" oval. It'll decrease in size, but the fit should work to where you won't need an adapter, over the the flange.
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:31 PM
CaffeineBuzz CaffeineBuzz is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportShot View Post
So the above section fits into the one below it?

The may sound stupid but I was kinda thinking it was like vehicle exhaust and put together the opposite of what you are saying. The reason being is wouldn't the smoke tend to want to leak out as it rises. If the upper section was outside the lower section, that wouldn't be possible. I'll take your word for it though.


I have a 30' travel trailer parked more or less, permanently, on some property. I removed the jack-knife sofa because it was never used anyway. I have an area about 6' wide by 4' deep to place the stove.

I have stone tiles covering the floor where the stove will sit. I still need to install a reflective surface along the wall behind it. I also will need to cut the hole in the ceiling. I have a heating cooling friend that will help me out with that when the time comes. Still have to remove some cupboards from above the area so yeah, this is a project and I hope to have it done by fall.

Its intended purpose is to provide enough heat to make it comfortable for a few overnight stays when the temps start to dip into the 20'sF. Just to take the chill out. Besides, travel trailers in general are not insulated well and it can get to 90 deg near the ceiling while being 40 deg near the floor. It will not be used often.

As far as towing the trailer and weight issues...I don't tow it often. About once every year or two and never more than a few miles to a dumping station at a public camp ground. The top part of stack above the roof will simply remove and I will fab up a brace to keep the stove from tipping or moving.

I was considering running the stack out the window with a 90 sideways and then another 90 upwards after its outside but...from what I understand, the bends can restrict how easily the smoke goes out and not pour into the interior when the door is opened.

The old propane furnace was located under the sofa so there is a vent near to provide air if needed.

It's intended to provide some heat and be safe.
Once you have proven draft, smoke will exit at the top only.

While smoke is traveling upward, it leaves a small residue on the side walls of the vent pipe. Over time, this accumulates. This accumulated resin or creosote softens and oozes when warmed up. It oozes down the inner side walls of your appliance. If you orientate your vent pipe such that the female end is on top and the male end is below, this creosote will ooze down the sides of your pipe. It then cooks on the outside of your pipe and stinks to high heaven...or worse...it catches on fire as it is flammable.

Here's an example of how not to do it:

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Old 06-26-2019, 08:44 AM
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While you're shopping for a chimney, be sure to get the brushes and extended rods to clean it with on a regular basis. Flue fires are a real bummer!
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Old 06-26-2019, 09:14 AM
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Originally Posted by biathlon View Post
While you're shopping for a chimney, be sure to get the brushes and extended rods to clean it with on a regular basis. Flue fires are a real bummer!
+1

And use only synthetic brushes. Plastic bristles will give you a good scrape without digging into the surface of the pipe. Metal brushes can destroy a metal pipe in less than one season.
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