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Old 06-04-2019, 08:03 AM
johnmcd johnmcd is offline
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Originally Posted by bunkerbuster View Post
Google Earth Pro is a good one to download.
The problem with Google Earth Pro is that it doesn't support downloading maps for offline use. In v5.0 you could zoom into an area and save that in local cache, then access it when you started up again, but as of v5.1 Google Earth won't even start up unless you have an internet connection to Google. That's why I save high-res screen captures of satellite images.
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Old 06-04-2019, 08:13 AM
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Speaking of laptops, costs and capabilities.

I bought a reconditioned HP laptop Elitebook 8440p from Amazon about 5 months ago when I thought my other laptop was dying.

It is an incredible machine. Absurd number of features. I wanted Windows 7 and an old school CD, and normal hard disk drive. $200.

Only problem was it came loaded with spyware. Actually had to put Malware bytes and CCleaner onto a thumb drive from another machine then use that to clean this one.

Anyway, a few hours of work and the machine is good as new. They even put a new battery in it. Super strong hinges.

Just another option.
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Old 06-04-2019, 09:59 AM
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If there is an EMP event, or something affecting "the grid" there won't BE ANY INTERNET or computers! Have everything backed up on PAPER! Ring binders are your friend! Make your essential survival manuals (first-aid, maps, etc.) in page protectors to preserve their usefulness. Others can be stored as regular paper references. Learn to navigate with a compass and paper map. Collect paper survival manuals and books and store them in moisture-proof containers. THESE will be what is that MOST important resources. Plus batteries eventually die and can't be recharged. But books have survived for CENTURIES.

Think about it.
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawk55732 View Post
You dont trust Encyclopedia Britannica either then. During a test on hundred of articles that were sent to subject matter experts, Wikipedia was nearly as accurate a Encyclopedia Britannica.
the guy who runs wikipedia actually got on a plane and flew out of the UK for the duration of Trump's visit because it hurt too much for him to physically be within the same country as him.

now it may be that wikipedia is pretty accurate on many things. i just wouldn't trust it too far on things that can be political. but we're talking SHTF, where such things are probably less likely to be critical.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ingyow View Post
If there is an EMP event, or something affecting "the grid" there won't BE ANY INTERNET or computers! Have everything backed up on PAPER! Ring binders are your friend! Make your essential survival manuals (first-aid, maps, etc.) in page protectors to preserve their usefulness. Others can be stored as regular paper references. Learn to navigate with a compass and paper map. Collect paper survival manuals and books and store them in moisture-proof containers. THESE will be what is that MOST important resources. Plus batteries eventually die and can't be recharged. But books have survived for CENTURIES.

Think about it.
paper is safer and requires less upkeep, this is true

however with adequate preparation, it is likely you could end up with a electronic device that survives an emp. i won't get into the nitty gritty of the science behind it, but here's the gist:

the things you can do to protect a device starting with the easiest

1. make sure it isn't plugged in. it seems obvious but it can make a difference. one of the most catastrophic effects of an EMP, as illustrated by the soviet project k testing, is massive overamperage events on the power and telecom grids. in russia this test set two power plants on fire and melted hundreds of miles of telephone cables. in theory the substation or your transformer will "take one for the team" and protect you, but this is not guaranteed. the danger vector here is power lines essentially becoming huge antennas and absorbing all the EM radiation and concentrating it. the corollary to this, which is harder and more expensive, is getting off the grid entirely for this reason alone.

2. the faraday cage. people get intimidated by the name. in it's simplest form it is a metal mesh or box. the box is more effective. you use one of these all the time - it's the reason why the microwave doesn't cook the whole kitchen. now that mesh is tuned specifically to stop the band microwaves work on. since EMPs can operate across many bands, you want a solid metal box as they will protect more, and across greater frequency range. as mentioned above, the metal filing cabinet. this is great. having multiple nested metal boxes within that is even better. if you took a laptop and put it inside a metal strongbox and put that inside a larger strongbox, and put that inside a filing cabinet, taped all the gaps/hinges in the boxes and the cabinet with aluminum foil tape, and air-gapped the contents with cardboard or something, i'd expect the contained device to survive pretty much anything except an EMP directly over your house.

the reason for this is the principle behind the cage - most EM radiation will be stopped from entering a metal box so long as the largest gap is smaller than half the wavelength of the radiation. this is why you want no gaps, and why i'd use aluminum foil tape to cover the gaps once you've decided to keep it shut in.
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Old 06-04-2019, 11:13 AM
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Not software, several old reliable high capacity laser printers, a huge supply of paper & printer cartridges. We have 24/7/365 reliable 25KW off/grid hydroelectric power at our BOL.



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Old 06-04-2019, 01:59 PM
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You could download all the knowledge that you can access, and print it out. Make-up binders of all that knowledge and fill a bookshelf.

Post-SHTF you would be expending a lot of effort to keep a laptop going. Eventually, it's circuits will fail.
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Old 06-04-2019, 02:11 PM
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In a SHTF scenario I don't rely on electronics. While I do have a laptop and data in a secure container, I will primarily use books, paper and hard copies. The computer is the weakest part of any SHTF plan.
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Old 06-04-2019, 02:22 PM
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Modern paper doesn't last. It's also heavy and bulky.
IMHO the proper answer is "all of the above"
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Old 06-04-2019, 05:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
Modern paper doesn't last. It's also heavy and bulky.
Legal & book grade acid free paper will last far more than a lifetime.
Case = 5000 sheets & multiple tightly stacked cases don't take up much room.
You are correct though, its heavy.

Sturdy 3 ring book binders are cheap & thrift stores are full of them
Manual Commercial & Business grade book 3 ring hole punch's are also.

Small 1 terabyte portable hard drives are pretty cheap & easy to EMP protect.
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Old 06-04-2019, 05:54 PM
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Quote:
You could download all the knowledge that you can access, and print it out. Make-up binders of all that knowledge and fill a bookshelf.
It would be more like filling a large building. Protecting books from vermin and the environment is a significant long term challenge....not to mention just how fast paper wears out from use. My favorite books are all falling into pieces, sometimes after only a few years.

Quote:
Post-SHTF you would be expending a lot of effort to keep a laptop going. Eventually, it's circuits will fail.

Eventually everything fails. Even if SHTF hit tomorrow I think most current preppers would die of old age before a laptop did.
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Old 06-04-2019, 06:56 PM
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A few ideas:

A second and third recovery USB drive.
When you can add a couple of 1TB USB drives and make rolling backups as you add information to the system.

I would add at least two quality dot matrix printers. A standard and a wide bed. Old ones, of course, but there are still good ones available. And, if possible get two of each, one for back up.

Get as many of the printer ribbons you can find, as long as the case and the ribbon is in good shape. Even if there is no ink left in the ribbon. You can recharge them with DIY ink.

Software:
A set of drivers for everything, including the dot-matrix printers. Include compatible drivers for as many different peripherals you can. You might come across all kinds of old equipment that can be put into use.

Find the information on making various types of inks and make sure you have the materials you need. Some will be organic, so you might need to plant a few things.

Setup and troubleshooting software for other operating systems, especially UNIX/ZENIX, DOS, Ethernet, Linux, Windows 7, Vista, Office 97, and the last few iOS systems.

Get as many emulators as you can, especially one or more to run iOS within the base system. Other emulators and adapters for the older connection systems. Serial with DB9 & DB25 support, printer port, IDE/PATA, ATA, SATA 1, SATA 2, SATA 3, SCSI, RS 422, RS 485, Ethernet with Cat6 cables and RJ45 connectors.

Emulators for older computers could be very useful, rather than trying to get an old system up and running.

Several Amateur Radio operating software for the major brands (Yaesu, Icom, Kenwood, TenTec, Alinco, etc.) plus generic types.

Weather data collection and analysis software and a forecaster if you can find one. Appropriate I/O interfaces for the sensors.

Medical databases with diagnostic algorithms.

Veterinary databases with diagnostic algorithms.

Alternative and homeopathic medical databases with detail descriptions and pictures of useful and dangerous plants of all kinds, and information on what parts are useable and which are deadly, and directions on how to use the correct parts.

Database of plants that can provide useful essential oils, with all applicable information for preparation and use.

Astronomy database with interactive movement both forward and backward in time. Identification aids for types of astronomical bodies and events.

A farmers' almanac type database with interactive features for as wide a variety of areas and plants as possible.

Gardening Database with companion planting and avoidance combinations information. Various garden layout preferences, etc.

Educational texts for math, basic science, technology, and all of the other necessary subjects required for a good education.

Application and practical books for using the same subjects.

A 'Rebuilding Civilization' library (If you want more details on this let me know here or in a PM.)

Surveying software, map creation software.

3D modeling software for mapping plus other forms.

Drafting software including design aids, symbol libraries, and other drafting aids. Specialized software for specific types of construction. Homes, business, commercial, underground, high-rise, etc.)

I have quite a few more in mind, but I am going to have to shut down for a while. The day is catching up with me.

Just my opinion.
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Old 06-04-2019, 07:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry D Young View Post
A few ideas:



A second and third recovery USB drive.

When you can add a couple of 1TB USB drives and make rolling backups as you add information to the system.



I would add at least two quality dot matrix printers. A standard and a wide bed. Old ones, of course, but there are still good ones available. And, if possible get two of each, one for back up.



Get as many of the printer ribbons you can find, as long as the case and the ribbon is in good shape. Even if there is no ink left in the ribbon. You can recharge them with DIY ink.



Software:

A set of drivers for everything, including the dot-matrix printers. Include compatible drivers for as many different peripherals you can. You might come across all kinds of old equipment that can be put into use.



Find the information on making various types of inks and make sure you have the materials you need. Some will be organic, so you might need to plant a few things.



Setup and troubleshooting software for other operating systems, especially UNIX/ZENIX, DOS, Ethernet, Linux, Windows 7, Vista, Office 97, and the last few iOS systems.



Get as many emulators as you can, especially one or more to run iOS within the base system. Other emulators and adapters for the older connection systems. Serial with DB9 & DB25 support, printer port, IDE/PATA, ATA, SATA 1, SATA 2, SATA 3, SCSI, RS 422, RS 485, Ethernet with Cat6 cables and RJ45 connectors.



Emulators for older computers could be very useful, rather than trying to get an old system up and running.



Several Amateur Radio operating software for the major brands (Yaesu, Icom, Kenwood, TenTec, Alinco, etc.) plus generic types.



Weather data collection and analysis software and a forecaster if you can find one. Appropriate I/O interfaces for the sensors.



Medical databases with diagnostic algorithms.



Veterinary databases with diagnostic algorithms.



Alternative and homeopathic medical databases with detail descriptions and pictures of useful and dangerous plants of all kinds, and information on what parts are useable and which are deadly, and directions on how to use the correct parts.



Database of plants that can provide useful essential oils, with all applicable information for preparation and use.



Astronomy database with interactive movement both forward and backward in time. Identification aids for types of astronomical bodies and events.



A farmers' almanac type database with interactive features for as wide a variety of areas and plants as possible.



Gardening Database with companion planting and avoidance combinations information. Various garden layout preferences, etc.



Educational texts for math, basic science, technology, and all of the other necessary subjects required for a good education.



Application and practical books for using the same subjects.



A 'Rebuilding Civilization' library (If you want more details on this let me know here or in a PM.)



Surveying software, map creation software.



3D modeling software for mapping plus other forms.



Drafting software including design aids, symbol libraries, and other drafting aids. Specialized software for specific types of construction. Homes, business, commercial, underground, high-rise, etc.)



I have quite a few more in mind, but I am going to have to shut down for a while. The day is catching up with me.



Just my opinion.
Let's here some more on the Rebuilding Civilization Library.

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Old 06-06-2019, 08:50 PM
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Here is a portion of my very long article on recovery after an apocalyptic event resulting in a PAW (Post Apocalyptic World), with the book lists at the end.

My thoughts on PAW Recovery

There are many things that will be required to occur before an effective recovery can occur after a long term, major, event that results in a WROL (without rule of law) PAW (post apocalyptic world) life for the survivors. Anything that brings us to this point is almost certainly to include a significant die-off of humans. From 50% to as much as 90%, or even more.

And, chances are, there will be great destruction of both natural and human made resources, including damage to many modern infrastructure items. With this being the case, as I think it will be, I have put together the following article to present my thoughts on the recovery of society, civilization, infrastructure, and all the supporting functions that are required for them to come back into existence and stay in existence for a significant period.

This article is comprised of primarily posts that I have made in the past on this and other forums as well as some new material. It is much to wade through, and though I have edited it, there will still be some duplication as some of the posts will not make sense without the material with it, which might have been in another post.

So feel free to skim any parts that do not apply to a specific interest or need. And since I imagine that will occur quite a bit, I will first do a summery based on what I believe the OP is requesting. After that will come the various posts and lists.

Please remember that when I do lists, particularly the long ones, they are invariably pick-and-choose lists, meant to give people some options to think about they might not otherwise, and some actual options between similar items. They are not meant to be get-one-of-everything lists (nor are they all-inclusive), but meant to provide some guide lines, ideas, and options. So please consider them as such and do not ignore them out of hand since they are long, and may seem to be bulky and heavy, not to mention expensive. Any given one might any of those, but they certainly are not all of them all of them.

And though it is sprinkled throughout the article, I again reiterate, everything is just my opinion. Use any of the information at your own risk, only after doing your own due-diligence research.

Now, for the short part:

Some thoughts on rebuilding civilization in the PAW:
While things might not get to a point of total collapse that requires the complete rebuilding of everything to do with a long term capable society, there is no way to know beforehand just what things will survive and be available, and what will not. So, as I usually do, worst case scenarios are used as the basis of the following ideas.

Not sure whether to start at the ‘top’ or the ‘bottom’. The top being the final things that will probably be done to bring the next society back to something resembling what we now have, but only (hopefully) better. And the bottom being those things that will need to occur before the ‘top’ can be accomplished. And in so saying, it appears rather obvious now, even to me, to start at the ‘bottom’.

In order to reach a point where enough people have enough extra resources beyond what they need to maintain their own survival, survival of their family and friends, and up into the beginnings of helping keep a small community going, the basics have to be covered first.

I consider this what most preppers are doing, and gathering resources and information with which to accomplish it. The standard long-term storage consumables to get one through until long term, reliable, sustainable sources can be put back into operation, or developed anew. Basic Human Needs. Breathable air, potable water, nutritious food, means to maintain core body temperature, shelter from the elements and aggressors, the means to protect oneself and the means to continue surviving, transportation to a degree, and communication with others, to name a few.

I really do feel like this section needs to delve into that part of it, though much information is included in the rest of the article.

Beyond the point where most of the people in an area are at the point above, and have enough resources and time to put toward building community, and then outward to link communities, and begin organized and cooperative activities to help everyone, and to enable the use of additional resources beyond each local area.

For this, a list of some of the necessary ideas, plans that will need to be made, equipment and supplies gathered, references needed, and skills to have available:

1) Road maintenance and repair
2) Bridge maintenance and repair
3) Road building
4) Flood control and diversion
5) Long range communications methods, equipment, and maintenance thereof
6) Electrical power distribution (small scale at first, but then larger area)
7) Electrical power generation on a scale to support communities
8) Dam (smaller ones, not the Hoover) maintenance and repair
9) Hydro electric power generation maintenance and repair
10) Small hydro electric power generation
11) Water acquisition, treatment, and distribution
12) Major structure repair, maintenance, and rebuilding
13) Town and small city administration
14) Human waste collection, treatment, and disposal
15) Trash collection, treatment, and disposal
16) Fuel production and distribution
17) Equipment (of all types) repair and maintenance
18) And all the support services that the above will require

Many of these needs can be fairly well addressed while still small scale using appropriate references commonly available in books and other publications available in print and in electronic form. Others, however, require a level of training, skill, and experience that cannot be readily obtained from reading and watching videos. So steps need to be taken to acquire the materials necessary to teach some of these subjects at the college level and above, and to provide means for gaining experience without major risk of harm to the participants or loss of valuable resources.

This is more difficult to do, as many of the text books and the required teacher aids are harder to find, and much more expensive, plus it requires some investment in hardware and supplies to enable the practice necessary.

I am finding some college level textbooks available on line, often free on Kindle, but have not solved the problems of having a teaching staff well trained enough to teach subjects outside their specialty and level.

So, one of the things I am trying to do is broaden my contact and acquaintance base to include as many people as I can that have these various skills, or that can teach them, given the right materials.

I cannot stress highly enough that strong and effective societies invariably have good infrastructure systems that are well designed, well installed, well maintained, and have additions and improvements scheduled far in advance, with a means to pay for them in place. Without the infrastructure, large scale operation are not possible, since people will not have the free time or resources to contribute if they must provide everything for themselves and their family.

Another set of things that I believe will be as important as the physical needs, are the psychological and physical comfort needs. In my own preps for rebuilding, even as resources for people 300 or more years in the future, my library contains works on a huge variety of non-critical-to-survival subjects.

These include spiritual and religious works of many types; extensive histories (so perhaps we/they CAN learn from history and not make the same mistakes); philosophical works of many kinds; all sorts of craft books (some that produce highly useful products, others for fun); general educational curriculum works; advanced curriculum works; medic works; older types of medical knowledge works; old-tech and no-tech references; and way too many more to list.

Except I want to specifically add that I am including a very wide range of fiction, as well. From the classics, to modern novels of many types, including romances, mysteries, thrillers, westerns, science fiction, humor, and more. I really believe that not only will these give some recreational down time, but will also help point out what was taking place in our time, and our history, so those in the future can learn from it.

I know that the above is not much in regards to the OP request, but I wanted to point out that the higher-level education professions will be needed for the recovery and rebuilding. It is imperative that we find a way to accomplish this, otherwise the learning curve to recover could be many decades, even a century or more, otherwise, as things will have to start from scratch, with teachers learning the hard way, gaining experience, passing on the training, and those newly trained getting the experience of time to be able to be effective in the reconstruction process. That is a many decade process to get to level of ability required.

Now, on to my many different posts that apply, at least in passing, to the subject at hand. Recovery and rebuilding in the PAW.


The basic process, once the immediate major dangers are over:
1) Set up salvage & recovery teams to gather remaining food, fuel, and other supplies
2) Set up soup kitchens to feed those without their own supplies using salvaged foods
3) Set up interim sanitation facilities
4) Clean up and get a clinic in operation
5) Do a census of both survivors and existing usable supplies
6) Get several farms in operation using the available manpower and equipment
7) Set up a defensive/police force to maintain security at the important sites as they come on-line
8) Make sure religious needs are met by providing time for workers to attend the church of their choice
9) Have elections to restore local government
10) Begin bringing basic infrastructure elements back on-line
11) (water supply, sewer disposal, road repair, postal service, food distribution, public transport, trash disposal, fuel distribution, etc.)
12) Begin bringing major infrastructure elements back on-line
13) (Electrical power generation & distribution, a hospital, train service, long-haul trucking, etc.)
14) Restart light industry and commercial operations
15) Restart heavy industry
16) Have regional/state/national elections
17) Continue all aspects of rebuilding civilization, hopefully a better one than the one we have


Civilization books:

If single purchase collections are allowed:
1) 32-volume Encyclopedia Britannica
2) Backwoods Home 'The Whole Shebang' Anthology collection
3) A.D.A.M Medical encyclopedia
4) Complete secular K-12 Home Schooling curriculum
5) 52-volume Harvard 5-feet of Books collection

If single books only:
1) When Technology Fails
2) Storey's Basic Country Skills
3) Magic and Medicine of Plants
4) SAS Survival Manual
5) Starship Troopers

Just my opinion


I think there would be some major differences in the list of books depending on the meaning of rebuilding civilization. Rebuilding and Civilization both have some rather broad meanings. Starting a civilization from scratch on a new planet is one thing. Bringing a civilization back from severe disintegration. Rebuilding a society is something else again.

The first and third would need histories and religious works for reference. The second not so much as other past histories would have little bearing and history and religion would develop on their own.

I suspect, however, that the OP means, what are the best books to cover all the scenarios. So, I'll give it a shot, based on that, and my own library.

Short list:
1) 32-volume Encyclopedia Britannica
2) Backwoods Home 'The Whole Shebang' Anthology collection
3) A.D.A.M. Medical encyclopedia
4) Complete secular K-12 Home Schooling curriculum
5) 52-volume Harvard 5-feet of Books collection


Some socio-political:
1) World Atlas
2) Oxford Unabridged Dictionary
3) Charter of Liberties
4) Articles of Freedom
5) Declaration of Independence
6) US Constitution
7) Bill of Rights
8) The Federalist Papers
9) Holy Bible - Old Testament
10) Holy Bible - New Testament
11) Book of Mormon
12) Koran

Some generalities:
1) Medical Library
2) Comprehensive emergency preparedness /self-sufficiency /survival reference book library
3) Collection of uniformly leather-bound editions of classic literature
4) Collection of general & popular fiction & non-fiction books & periodicals
5) Current encyclopedias /almanacs /books of facts /etc.
6) Collection of historical encyclopedias /almanacs /books of facts /etc.
7) Comprehensive general reference section
8) Comprehensive technical reference section
9) Comprehensive how-to reference collection
10) Encyclopedia Britannica reference library
11) Professional writer's edition thesaurus
12) Professional writer's edition manual of style
13) Professional writer's edition book of quotations
14) Library issue unabridged dictionary
15) Library issue reference atlas
16) Library issue geography reference
17) Library issue astronomy reference
18) Library quality globe w/stand
19) Moon globe / solar system model & star map globe w/pivot stand
20) Classroom quality wall map assembly w/maps

Some specifics:
Medical books:
1) Gray's Anatomy
2) Magic And Medicine Of Plants Readers Digest
3) The American Medical Association Home Medical Encyclopedia
4) The Home Remedies Handbook John H Renner
5) Emergency War Surgery US Government
6) Ship's Medicine Chest and Medical Aid at Sea US Government
7) Where There Is No Dentist Murry ****son
8) Where There Is No Doctor David Werner
9) Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West Gregory L Tilford
10) Backyard Medicine Bruton-Seal & Seal
11) Wilderness Medicine by William W Forgery
12) Modern Essentials 4th ed. - Guide to the Use of Essential Oils by Aroma Tools
13) Ditch Medicine Hugh L Coffee
14) Edible and Medicinal Plants, A Survival Guide
15) Herbal Formulas
16) Ship Captain's Medical Guide 22nd Edition Maritime and Coastguard Agency
17) Ship Captain's Medical Stores

Outdoor books:
1) Bushcraft Richard Graves
2) Outdoor Survival Skills Larry Dean Olsen
3) Wildwood Wisdom Ellsworth Jaeger

Prep manuals & related:
1) Dare To Prepare Holly Deyo
2) Making The Best Of Basics - Family Preparedness Handbook James Talmage Stevens
3) Nuclear War Survival Skills Cresson Kearny
4) SAS Survival Handbook John "Lofty" Wiseman
5) SAS Urban Survival Handbook John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman
6) Stay Alive! Survival Skills You Need John D McCann
7) The Art Of War Sun Tzu
8) When Technology Fails Matthew Stein

Self-sufficiency/Homesteading:
1) Humanure Handbook Joseph Jenkins
2) Carrots Love Tomatoes Louise Riotte
3) Cold Climate Gardening Lewis Hill
4) Back to Basics Readers Digest
5) Storey’s Basic Country Skills John & Martha Storey
6) Storey’s Survival Wisdom
7) Storey’s Country Wisdom
8) The Encyclopedia of Country Living Carla Emery
9) The Guide To Self-Sufficiency John Seymour
10) Something on biodiesel

Mechanics:
1) Machinery's Handbook
2) Machinery's Handbook supplement

Some fiction:
1) Have Space Suit, Will Travel by Robert A. Heinlein (An inspiration to me when I was young)
2) Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein (Socio/political commentary in novel form.)
3) And the rest of the works of Robert A Heinlein (for the same reasons as above.)
4) Bulldozer by Stephen W. Meader (Another inspirational story when I was in my teens.)
5) A Hero For Henry by Herbert R. Purdum (A great old west comedy with valuable lessons.)
6) An Elephant For Aristotle by L. Sprague de Camp (Another Socio/political commentary in novel form.)
7) The works of Louis L'Amour The westerns and Night Over The Solomons & West From Singapore
8) The works of Zane Gray
9) The works of Edgar Rice Burroughs especially Tarzan At The Earth’s Core
10) The works of Earle Stanley Gardner
11) The works of Andre Norton especially Sea Siege
12) The works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
13) The works of Sir Henry Rider Haggard
14) The works of Sandra Brown (Believe it or not, I learned a lot from romance novels.)
15) The works of Nora Roberts (Another fine romance novelist that gave me a lot to think about.)

Just a kind of random start.

Just my opinion.


5 books & 3 collections on which to base the rebuilding of civilization in the late stages of a PAW:
1) Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein (Socio/political commentary in novel form.)
2) An Elephant For Aristotle by L. Sprague de Camp (Another Socio/political commentary in novel form.)
3) Miss Manners' Guide for the Turn-of-the-Millennium by Judith Martin (More than just manners. How people interact in many different situations.)
4) The Art of War by Sun Tzu (Insights on how political entities deal with one another)
5) A single volume containing:
a. The Ten Commandments (A true interpretation)
b. Charter of Liberties
c. The Federalist Papers
d. Declaration of Independence
e. US Constitution
f. Bill of Rights
g. Articles of Freedom
6) 32-volume Encyclopedia Britannica
7) 52-volume Harvard 5-feet of Books collection
8) Complete secular K-12 Home Schooling curriculum

Just my opinion.
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As an engineer, I might suggest some engineers if you want to rebuild beyond the horse and buggy era.

Chemical, Electrical, mechanical, civil, ceramic, aeronautical, nuclear engineers.

Estimators, draftsmen, CAD operators, project managers, welders, fitters, riggers, miners, metallurgists, geologists, bridge designers, demolition experts, robotics engineers, NDT testing engineers, foundry workers, machinists, smelter operators, cement kiln operators and designers, hydraulics technicians, heavy machinery repairmen, millwrights, ...
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Originally Posted by Justme11 View Post
As an engineer, I might suggest some engineers if you want to rebuild beyond the horse and buggy era.

Chemical, Electrical, mechanical, civil, ceramic, aeronautical, nuclear engineers.

Estimators, draftsmen, CAD operators, project managers, welders, fitters, riggers, miners, metallurgists, geologists, bridge designers, demolition experts, robotics engineers, NDT testing engineers, foundry workers, machinists, smelter operators, cement kiln operators and designers, hydraulics technicians, heavy machinery repairmen, millwrights, ...
The thread was about books, but I really like the list of people and skill sets. I will be adding a couple I do not already have in my useful skills list.

And I would certainly appreciate any good references and/or textbooks, or teaching aids for the skills you have listed. I have some for several of the skills, but definitely not all of them.

Thank you for the additions.

Just my opinion.
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Originally Posted by Jerry D Young View Post
The thread was about books, but I really like the list of people and skill sets. I will be adding a couple I do not already have in my useful skills list.

And I would certainly appreciate any good references and/or textbooks, or teaching aids for the skills you have listed. I have some for several of the skills, but definitely not all of them.

Thank you for the additions.

Just my opinion.
Sorry, I thought you had a list of professions there as well.
I must have been hallucinating. LOL.
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Actually, if you opened it before I edited it, you might have seen a list of skills. I am pretty sure I posted a much longer version that did include skills, but decided that since it was about books I should take them out. I do not see the notation that it was edited, so I am not sure.

No matter. It got me some good info, which I always appreciate. So thanks again.

Just my opinion.
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Originally Posted by wldwsel View Post
I don't know how handy GoogleEarth would be in a real, never coming back SHTF. Or any other space based system for that matter. Even if they survived the events that led to the breakdown, they still need maintenance from the ground, people with good comms to keep them on line and replacement satellites in the not so far future.
Google Earth is not a live feed from the satellites, just a bunch of photos stitched together with special software.

Should the satellites fail for any reason, the service would still be available. It just would not be updated anymore. In the even satellites fail, I would guess internet service will not work anymore either so this is just an academic discussion.

I guess there could be few guys at google who could internally access Google Earth even when the earth it burning but for the rest of the world it would not be useful.
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For me to have internet access, I need my local ISP [the local telephone company] to have grid power so they can convert fiber-optic signal to phone line [twisted copper wire] signal from the county seat to my town.

Then every bozo internet company that links the signal from my ISP onto the destination. If we are talking about the Google HQ for satellite photos.

For all of this to work, the S has not HTF.
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