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Old 06-17-2019, 11:30 PM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is online now
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Default Dealing with a seep in a roadway



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One of my new roads across my property has a seep in it of significance enough to be an issue.

I don't have to move the water far before an elevation change and it's out the way, but what should I do in the road?

I know I can dump gravel into it and it'll just swallow it.

Dig it out, do? And a culvert?

Or...? (I have no idea)

Thank you
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Old 06-17-2019, 11:39 PM
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When this happened to our road the eventual solution (which we got the county to pay for as they caused it in the first place) was to dump ROCK (4-6" sized cobble) not gravel (which was tried, and which failed) and then top that with gravel.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:02 AM
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Last time I did that it took 6 dump truck loads.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:36 AM
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Without pictures itís a bit of a guessing game. Is moving the road an option?

I have a culvert in one section of my road and it takes work each year to keep my road open. Moving my road is not an option as I only own a 30 yard wide 1/2 mile stretch of land to get to my property, so I have to make the culvert work.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:44 AM
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Part of the county maintained street in front of my a house as it ascends a hill interrupted an underground water flow. The seepage was causing little sink holes to form under the pavement. They intercepted most of the water flow before it got under the road and diverted to a road barrow ditch. I did not see exactly what they did, but it was likely some sort of french drainage. In days prior to any building there was a water way there that during and after rains drained actually to part of my property since I am below the hill. There is still some water that comes during rains on the surface, but it is a lot less now days. And I do have water logged soil after rains in some places where I can not plant fruit trees.

If there is underground water, if possible intercept or somehow stop it from getting under the road. A road made of gravel is not so bad since it may allow the water to simply flow through and not displace the soil under road maybe.
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Old 06-18-2019, 01:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
Last time I did that it took 6 dump truck loads.
Yeah, it took a few for us too. Luckily we were not the ones paying for it. The ditch people widened an irrigation ditch, which made it start leaking pretty badly since they removed all the mud that was sealing up the bottom, so it started sub irrigating into our road a hundred yards downhill of the ditch.


If its not a road you use a lot you could corduroy it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corduroy_road
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Old 06-18-2019, 02:01 AM
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Without pictures it’s a bit of a guessing game. Is moving the road an option?

.
I've already sent the dozer back to that side of the property once, he's almost worked his way out, and we are over 40 hours.

In 3-6 years I'll have a dozer past that point when I put in my ICF hiuse, but for now I'll just be going down that road to get to the orchard and to play.

But I'll have a track hoe or mini ex right by there in a month or so trenching in a water line.
And I have pretty much constant access to a tractor with a front end loader.

I was actually thinking a culvert might be cheaper and not put a unnecessary big 'kink" in a straight stretch of road.

...but I'm not sure if how to get it to go though a culvert. ( I'm from southern La, there's water 6" down everywhere, we don't have things like this)
-This popped up within the last few days as the road was put in.
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Old 06-23-2019, 11:58 PM
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Put a French drain in

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Old 06-24-2019, 12:26 AM
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Put a French drain in

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That seems to be the best solution.

I'll be looking at a small tractor with a. Backhoe tomorrow, and if not that be renting a track hoe within a month (I hope)
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Old 06-24-2019, 07:41 AM
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One of those smallish tractors with a backhoe and ladder and whatever else you get in the way of attachments would be pretty handy to have around. Don't go to small tho

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Old 06-25-2019, 06:22 AM
Don H Don H is offline
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We had a seep in the middle of the paved road near my house. The road crew came in with a backhoe and dug a diagonal trench across the road from the seep point to the ditch, layer in fabric, gravel, slotted pipe, more gravel, then paved over it. That solved the problem.
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Old 06-25-2019, 07:38 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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I had a 3 foot square place in one of my driveways that was always muddy. Had dug out to about 10 inches deep due to traffic. I dumped a couple of buckets of #53 gravel in it and it has held up for 6 years and still looks OK - still damp, but it isn't burying the gravel.

I had used what we cal "crush and run", which is ground up granite with small gravel, on most of our roads, but if I do any repair or additions, I use #53. It's cheaper, holds up much better, and the edges cut whatever grass comes up in it, where the other stuff doesn't.

I'm not too far from where you are, probably 100 miles North, so this stuff should work for you.

WW

Shoot straight - stay safe
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:24 AM
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If it's on an incline, you'll want to set some piers on the downhill side. Then, before bringing in fill, you'll need to saturate and pack the area. You'll want to then put crushed rock as a bed. Granite is best, but you can use other materials that are cheaper. I used shale because it was available and much cheaper. The key is to tamp a very solid bed. The water will shed through the rock naturally. Don't skimp on material. You'll want a nice thick layer of rock.

Are we sure there isn't an old stump buried under the ground that is rotting? Rotting wood causes this to happen. I am only assuming it's due to run-off, but other factors could come in to play.
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