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Old 06-01-2019, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Sky1950 View Post
after reading bunkerbuster's post, maybe Kiwi.
There is a recent kiwi cultivar named "golden dragon kiwi".
That is said to do well in Texas.
I think it was developed about 15 years ago
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Old 06-01-2019, 08:17 PM
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What are the best fruit trees for preppers? We want something for making preserves, jelly and eating fresh. Important issues should be ease of growth, drought tolerance, and nutrition.

My choices:

Fig
Pear
Peach and/or nectarine
Plum

I have four apple trees on the farm, but they rarely produce. Not sure if it has to do with cross pollination, or time of year when the trees bloom.

Another favorite in the southern portion of the United States is Mayhaw. I used to know a guy who made four mayhaw trees, and they would produce thousands of berries every year.
There's been an Italian Plum tree growing in the woods, around the south side of my parents house for years.
In fact, the original one fell over and died many years ago and one of the plums from that tree germinated and grew into a new tree.
We had a big snow this past winter and the tree fell over due to the weight of the snow on it, but its still green and alive!
...I still plan on righting it and supporting it with some plastic pipes.
Good fruit and the trees last forever.
They also have a King Apple tree in the front yard that was probably planted in the 1940's when the house was originally built.
Even though us kids tried to convince mom to chop it down since no one had seen many apples on it, last year the thing gave us 3 boxes worth and that was maybe a little more than 1/2 of the tree's yield.
….so, apple trees might be a worth while fruit tree to grow, as well.

….FWIW, I live in the PNW.
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Old 06-02-2019, 01:35 PM
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WE have had thornless honey locusts for decades: shade for livestock that grass grows under well, they fix nitrogen, pods are good livestock feed (+ use for thickening ice cream or kids snacks). I do not think you need 2, but not sure. There are improved varieties for high pod production.
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Old 06-02-2019, 03:51 PM
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ITA that the best fruit are those that thrive locally. For me, here in zone 4, those are apples, pears, peaches (yes, there is a peach that thrives north of zone 5), sour cherries, honey berries, strawberries, grapes, artic kiwi, highbush cranberry, blueberry, blackberries, raspberries, black walnut, butternut, etc. All those I just listed are living happily on my in-city 1/4 acre lot. There are probably a couple more, but... This will change based on your own location. What works where _you_ live?
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Old 06-02-2019, 05:09 PM
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I had some fruit trees die because of very hot humid weather, plus too many
hours at work to take the time to do much about the fungus that killed a cherry, and pear tree.

Then we had the coldest solid 3 weeks which killed off one of my young fig trees. I had pipes freeze which had been fine for many decades.

So I thought long and hard about what to replace them with. I decided that because Pawpaw trees grow native in my area I would give them a try.

One thing I like about them is that they actually require less sunlight than other fruit trees. If they get too much sun it may kill them.


So while I have more Fig Trees than any other tree (6), because they seem to be fungus proof, I really liked having a Tree that does not want much direct sun also.
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Old 06-03-2019, 01:27 AM
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I know the OP was for "trees" but I will add to the other suggestions to consider berries, and include currants and honeyberries. We have amazing success with Ben Sarek black and Rovada red currants for preserves and wine. Skip the Red Lake currants-- they are so tiny-- but good for birds. Gooseberries and Jostaberries also grow well and produce heavily.
Honeyberries are a little unknown but becoming more popular. Do a search and find out! They taste like blueberries but do not require acidic soil pampering.

The Natives used to make pemmican with berries, fat & venison (maybe some other ingred too).

There are also Juneberries which is a shrub--like tree (beautiful, landscape worthy), can be pruned to a single trunk. We had several but could never get the fruits before the birds, so replaced with the currants and are very content.
What part of the country are you located at ?
Robert, we are about 8 hours North of SW Missouri. Zone 3b/4a. Dearly wish we could grow peaches. But only do the berries, as well as Bali Evans cherry, pears, and apples.
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Old 06-03-2019, 08:56 AM
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Robert, we are about 8 hours North of SW Missouri. Zone 3b/4a. Dearly wish we could grow peaches. But only do the berries, as well as Bali Evans cherry, pears, and apples.
I believe Albert peach is a zone 3 peach.
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Old 06-03-2019, 08:56 AM
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So how do cold hardy kiwis taste? How are they eaten?
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Old 06-03-2019, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Truck Vet View Post
I had some fruit trees die because of very hot humid weather, plus too many
hours at work to take the time to do much about the fungus that killed a cherry, and pear tree.

Then we had the coldest solid 3 weeks which killed off one of my young fig trees. I had pipes freeze which had been fine for many decades.

So I thought long and hard about what to replace them with. I decided that because Pawpaw trees grow native in my area I would give them a try.

One thing I like about them is that they actually require less sunlight than other fruit trees. If they get too much sun it may kill them.


So while I have more Fig Trees than any other tree (6), because they seem to be fungus proof, I really liked having a Tree that does not want much direct sun also.
i have been playing around paw paws. They will survive in very heavy shade but after two years do need more open habitat to grow. In heavy shade they just sit there and do not grow. While most of mine are on the margin of wet lands associated with creek, those growing in uplands are doing well also. I heard one case where 100% sunshine appears to have killed over time adult stage paw paws. So I will leave them some partial shade. I am in the pan handle of nwFL. There are a few native patches locally, but not many that are known. These could be of native american origin or settlers planted them.
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Old 06-03-2019, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Offrink View Post
So how do cold hardy kiwis taste? How are they eaten?
We usually make jams / preserves / smoothie type juice & popsicles mixed with strawberries with them.

Below are some other ways.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipes/1.../kiwis/?page=2
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Old 06-03-2019, 10:57 AM
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So how do cold hardy kiwis taste? How are they eaten?
Peel off the outer skin, cut into thin slices, serve over ice cream or cake, or eat the slices by themselves.
Good schtuff!
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Old 06-03-2019, 02:47 PM
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Why peel the skin ? We just eat fresh out of hand... just like grapes. As we (hopefully) get more (I see the 'average' commercial is 40# per vine, where I got my starts, she has ONE old vine, gets close to 200 pounds a year) we were thinking wine, juice and possible try drying them. The Cold Hard (no fuzzy skin) have a much higher sugar content. Sam's club will have them from time to time (much less than the fuzzy one's).
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Old 06-03-2019, 03:23 PM
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Sorry Bob. It was how I was taught.
I'll have to try it with the skin on some time.
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Old 06-07-2019, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
What are the best fruit trees for preppers? We want something for making preserves, jelly and eating fresh. Important issues should be ease of growth, drought tolerance, and nutrition.

My choices:

Fig
Pear
Peach and/or nectarine
Plum

I have four apple trees on the farm, but they rarely produce. Not sure if it has to do with cross pollination, or time of year when the trees bloom.

Another favorite in the southern portion of the United States is Mayhaw. I used to know a guy who made four mayhaw trees, and they would produce thousands of berries every year.
In no particular order:

- Native fruits. For example, paw-paw.

- Fruits in their "native state" (those that grow wild without having been selectively crossed and "improved" from the design nurture intended). For example, sand plum.

- Fruits that are not much "improved." That is to say, ones that more resemble their native forbears, or have been brought to selective crossing more recently. For example, sea buckthorn.

- Fruits that have few, if any, native pests and diseases. For example, jujube.

- Fruits developed for disease and pest resistance. For example, some varieties of pear are fireblight resistant.

- Improved fruits that naturalize in your particular garden. For example, a variety of modern apple might turn out not to be particularly susceptible to the pests and diseases in your area.

- Fruits that can be adapted to overcome pests and diseases naturally. For example, I had a peach tree that was so robust, it survived and thrived despite a chronic peach canker infection.

For survivalists, these will serve much better than improved fruits, which often need chemical sprays to grow adequately.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:53 AM
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I believe Albert peach is a zone 3 peach.
I got so excited thinking of growing peaches....could not find "Albert" variety of peach, however perhaps you refer to the "Elberta" peach, but that is zone 5-9.
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:40 PM
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Reliance Peach is a zone 4 peach. https://www.starkbros.com/products/f...reliance-peach (yeah, I know it's a Stark's link, but it's dead on.) And they aren't joking about the heavy production. Mine started bearing 2 years ago, with last year being the first year of full size peaches, and these puppies are jumbo sized, and I didn't know what to do with them all. We've just finished blooming here, and I was looking at the tree going..."I'm in trouble this year, aren't I..."
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Old 06-10-2019, 02:58 PM
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Catfeet,

Doesn't this site have a "for sale" section?
Might be time to set up your store front!
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:02 AM
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[QUOTE=Harmless Drudge;19571512]In no particular order:

- Fruits that have few, if any, native pests and diseases. For example, jujube.


In addition to the above. jujube trees are cold and heat resistant, as well as drought tolerant. The fruit has a long life on the tree with several usable stages of the fruit, including drying on the tree. My personal tree which was existing on the property is very prolific, with over a thousand fruit every year in a very small footprint.

Also the fruit are high in vitamin c and a good source of potassium.

Only downsides have been the number of fruit, the birds in California absolutely love them and as a suckering plant they spread quite well with more sun and rain.
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Old 06-14-2019, 09:59 AM
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I have some extra pear, apple and peach trees which I grafted last year. I'll plant them near the seasonal creek and see how things go. the black walnut is growing but very slow. I'd like to get some cherry trees but they are difficult for me to graft. May just plant seeds
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Old 06-14-2019, 11:17 AM
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I have some extra pear, apple and peach trees which I grafted last year. I'll plant them near the seasonal creek and see how things go. the black walnut is growing but very slow. I'd like to get some cherry trees but they are difficult for me to graft. May just plant seeds
planting seeds for many fruits is a crap shoot as to what you will get. I do not know how cherries are. Many citrus will breed true from seeds in being like the parent that produce the orange.
Seedlings will yield fruit in most cases, but it may not be as desirable as the parent tree. Trees like peaches often do breed true also if there are no other pollinators nearby. The original apples orchards that were for hard cider were initially seed planted with some seedlings yield sweet tasting apples, but rest were for pressing cider. Hard cider production orchards often got chopped down during prohibition is what I read when americans tended to drink their fruit vs eating it. The railroads and eventually refrigerated cars along with a demand for fresh fruit changed that.
John Chapman aka johnny appleseed was planting apples IIRC for cider production. In those years homesteaders were expected to plant fruit tress.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-...ier-180953263/
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"Up until Prohibition, an apple grown in America was far less likely to be eaten than to wind up in a barrel of cider," writes Michael Pollan in The Botany of Desire. "In rural areas cider took the place of not only wine and beer but of coffee and tea, juice, and even water."
Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-...HIj8RJwIGFS.99
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Starting in 1792, the Ohio Company of Associates made a deal with potential settlers: anyone willing to form a permanent homestead on the wilderness beyond Ohio's first permanent settlement would be granted 100 acres of land. To prove their homesteads to be permanent, settlers were required to plant 50 apple trees and 20 peach trees in three years, since an average apple tree took roughly ten years to bear fruit.
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