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Old 05-28-2019, 04:51 PM
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Default Treated wood and carpenter bees and such



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I have porches, decks and other structures made of treated wood. Some of what I am using for support beams have holes in them. Is there anyway to keep the critters from gouging holes and tunnels in the wood?

In some cases I will go and inspect, likely scabbing on new wood to reinforce points that have holes in them.
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:25 AM
Brettny Brettny is offline
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No bug likes wood coated in used motor oil. There are other good oil based stains out there too but expect to pay $45-50 a gal.
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Brettny View Post
No bug likes wood coated in used motor oil. There are other good oil based stains out there too but expect to pay $45-50 a gal.
So I need an oil based stain. Used motor oil on elevated, overhead beams on a deck overhanging a porch in full view is not a good option. I can see it for something out of sight.
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Old 05-29-2019, 08:48 AM
two bits two bits is offline
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I haven't seen much drilling into treated lumber, even old repurposed lumber. Now, the new pine lumber seems to have a smell that attracts them. I made some carpenter bee traps. I found that location, location, location of the traps is most important. One had 14 bees and and others none, just a few feet away.
As I'm working in the shop, when I hear a bee, I got a paddle that I enjoy banging them with. Its a lot of fun.
It seems at nightfall, the bees come into their hole to spend the night. I was under the impression each hole represents a bee. Must not be so. As I was locking up for the nite, I heard the hum of bees, grabbing my paddle I investigated. There were over a dozen flying in to one hole. I think I got um all.
After dark, fill each hole with caulk. This will seal their fate. They will normally refuse to go forward and there is no exit for them to back out of. Try this and see if it works for U. These holes can be found easily by the sawdust on the floor, wall, & etc.
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Old 05-29-2019, 10:50 AM
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Carpenter bees
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Economic Importance

While the damage to wood from the drilling activities of a single bee is slight, the subsequent year's broods will expand the tunnel through branching activities and may cause considerable structural damage. Additionally, they will commonly defecate on the wall or other item directly below the opening causing stains.

Carpenter bees do not eat wood. They excavate the tunnels for shelter and as chambers in which to rear their young. They usually attack unpainted objects such as doors, windowsills, roof eaves, shingles, railings, telephone poles, and sometimes wooden lawn furniture.

A carpenter bee begins her nest by drilling a nearly perfectly round entrance hole (about 1/2 inch diameter) into the wood. This hole is usually against the grain of the wood. When the tunnel is about 1 inch deep, the bee turns at right angles to the initial hole and tunnels with the grain of the wood. Bees prefer to attack wood that is greater than two inches thick.
They are also known as good pollinators.
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:22 PM
Don H Don H is offline
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Fake hornet nests made of a brown or gray plastic grocery bag stuffed with other bags and hung up help.

I never had much luck with traps, either homemade or bought.

The little buggers drill a hole in the wood from underneath and then make a turn as they bore. I have torn down old structures in the winter where a dozen bees where stacked in a hole, one behind the other.

Brakeclean kills them. Use the straw to make the turn in their hole and give 'em a direct shot. Then patch with wood patch or another bee finish the hole.

Also whacking them with a badminton racket is fun.
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