Critique my GHB - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How do you justify the contents of your GHB? StayFrosty Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 91 08-18-2019 06:08 AM
Food for GHB Immortality Food and water 31 04-20-2019 10:21 PM
GHB first field test starbright Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 22 03-09-2019 11:01 PM
Critique my GHB IndMechanic Urban Survival 98 09-13-2018 04:25 PM
5 Hour Energy in GHB? starbright Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 68 08-20-2018 12:46 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-26-2019, 10:23 PM
proud Texan proud Texan is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Texas
Age: 32
Posts: 25
Thanks: 7
Thanked 44 Times in 15 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharkbait View Post
25 miles?
Hmmmmm.......
At 3mph that comes out to 8.5 hours of walking.


Pack of smokes and a hip flask?
Maybe bring a burrito. I like the Chile Verde with avocado chunks.
🍻 touche
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to proud Texan For This Useful Post:
Old 05-26-2019, 10:31 PM
Lost Woods Survival's Avatar
Lost Woods Survival Lost Woods Survival is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: South-east NC
Posts: 924
Thanks: 22
Thanked 977 Times in 499 Posts
Default

I also try and put things on my belt. I live in NC/SC and the humidity is what kills here. And a backpack can warm you up quick. I have a side bag that I carry and prefer over a backpack.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-26-2019, 10:42 PM
Tactical Lever Tactical Lever is online now
Wearing fur underwears...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NW of most; in God's country
Posts: 2,358
Thanks: 4,418
Thanked 2,264 Times in 1,151 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dontbuypotteryfromme View Post
Paracord is too thick for shoes?
I think it would be. Even if it's not, who wants to start cutting, measuring and trying to force a singed end through the eyelets?

Forgot about the leather gloves I was going to mention. I don't feel dressed when I'm out in the bush without some leather ropers.

Binos were mentioned. I like the idea, and like having some on hand. But hiking, I would look for a compact pair, or a monocular.
Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-26-2019, 10:47 PM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Nuevo Alamo
Posts: 5,688
Thanks: 6,911
Thanked 13,347 Times in 4,315 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharkbait View Post
25 miles?
Hmmmmm.......
At 3mph that comes out to 8.5 hours of walking.


Pack of smokes and a hip flask?
Maybe bring a burrito. I like the Chile Verde with avocado chunks.
Highly unlikely you will be traveling at anything close to that speed in a disaster so sever that you are walking 25 miles to get home.

You cannot apply 'normal' standards to post SHTF operations.

Quote:
Ditch the multi tools.
I cannot disagree more. I would abandon knives and food before a multi-tool. I use them every single day, and that is PRE-SHTF....when everything is going to hell I would need them even more. I can't even begin to list the uses for them, or the real world emergencies I've used them for. My leatherman is almost like a third hand. I feel almost crippled without it.

Quote:
Ditch the Bic and get a more reliable Star or Zippo style lighter with a little fuel
Again, cannot disagree more. These kind of lighters are notorious for going dry in storage. They are a novelty at this point, not survival gear.

Quote:
Allergy tablets, and an Epi-pen.
Only if you're severely allergic. Very very few people actually are. Carrying one 'just in case' is an extremely expensive, relatively bulky and hard to store prep. They expire in just a couple years, and even faster if stored in a hot car.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Aerindel For This Useful Post:
Old 05-26-2019, 10:53 PM
NickB NickB is offline
This is a great survival forum
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Blue Ridge foot hills
Posts: 584
Thanks: 690
Thanked 1,135 Times in 369 Posts
Default

You can get 25 miles in one day no problem (barring no crazy things happen). Add a first aid kit, snacks, get rid of the mason jar (just get a water bladder) and get a holster.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-26-2019, 11:00 PM
cannonfoddertfc's Avatar
cannonfoddertfc cannonfoddertfc is offline
Sheepdog in Wolf clothing
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,106
Thanks: 2,213
Thanked 2,298 Times in 790 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB View Post
You can get 25 miles in one day no problem (barring no crazy things happen). Add a first aid kit, snacks, get rid of the mason jar (just get a water bladder) and get a holster.
And you will make yourself physically worthless for the foreseeable future.
Unless you actively walk long distances on a very regular basis, consider 10 miles as stretching the limit. Anything more and you will very likely hurt yourself. Arriving home broken will not do you or your family any good.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to cannonfoddertfc For This Useful Post:
Old 05-26-2019, 11:18 PM
NickB NickB is offline
This is a great survival forum
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Blue Ridge foot hills
Posts: 584
Thanks: 690
Thanked 1,135 Times in 369 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cannonfoddertfc View Post
And you will make yourself physically worthless for the foreseeable future.
Unless you actively walk long distances on a very regular basis, consider 10 miles as stretching the limit. Anything more and you will very likely hurt yourself. Arriving home broken will not do you or your family any good.

Hmm, thats fair. I took a lot of strolls like this in the military and just never got out of the habit. Granted i no longer go 20 miles in a single trip with 100lbs ruck lol.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-26-2019, 11:26 PM
Tactical Lever Tactical Lever is online now
Wearing fur underwears...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NW of most; in God's country
Posts: 2,358
Thanks: 4,418
Thanked 2,264 Times in 1,151 Posts
Default

[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
Highly unlikely you will be traveling at anything close to that speed in a disaster so sever that you are walking 25 miles to get home.

You cannot apply 'normal' standards to post SHTF operations.



I cannot disagree more. I would abandon knives and food before a multi-tool. I use them every single day, and that is PRE-SHTF....when everything is going to hell I would need them even more. I can't even begin to list the uses for them, or the real world emergencies I've used them for. My leatherman is almost like a third hand. I feel almost crippled without it.
A good multi-tool is a handy thing if you need a pile of non-ideal tools and need something that fits on the belt. I carry a couple of boxes of tools in my truck, to take care of likely tasks. But when I'm on foot, I could use a knife, and that's about it. Maybe tweezers, and tick remover, but that's where the 1st Aid kit comes in.

Quote:
Again, cannot disagree more. These kind of lighters are notorious for going dry in storage. They are a novelty at this point, not survival gear.
Of course they'll go dry. You need to be topping them up or carry fuel. But he's a smoker, so that's not likely.

I used to carry a jet torch when out and about. I found with some of the refills, that it was not reliable, even though it was awesome most of the time. Eventually the piezo ignition quit. Now my EDC is either a peanut lighter which has an o-ring, and stays wet for a few months, or a Blast match which also stays full a long time. Or a Star.

Bics can stay for a long time, or they can suddenly leak, and then are junk. A quality liquid fluid lighter is near stone hammer reliable, and could run on gas, camping fuel, or probably methanol in a pinch. I always have lighter fluid in my truck, and can carry a small container on foot. And I always have a 100 liters of gas in the truck.

Quote:
Only if you're severely allergic. Very very few people actually are. Carrying one 'just in case' is an extremely expensive, relatively bulky and hard to store prep. They expire in just a couple years, and even faster if stored in a hot car.
Actually they don't go bad. You can donate expired ones, and they may be used years later. Not expensive or bulky. Probably weighs half an ounce with full pack of loratadine tablets to boot.

Having a minor allergy can be extremely inconveniencing. Had a sudden hay fever attack out of the blue one day. Could barely see for the tears streaming down my face. Acted up for probably a year or two, then it didn't bother much any more. Then I had a one time allergy that came directly out of my regular routine, exact same foods, chemicals, materials and locations as the days before and after. Had to go to the hospital to get a couple shots when I felt my lips fatten up and my eyes get squinty.

Being hours from a hospital, and encountering bugs that have probably never bitten you, or getting stung by a bee or hornet would be a terrible time to find out you have a serious allergy.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Tactical Lever For This Useful Post:
Old 05-26-2019, 11:54 PM
proud Texan proud Texan is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Texas
Age: 32
Posts: 25
Thanks: 7
Thanked 44 Times in 15 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tactical Lever View Post

Binos were mentioned. I like the idea, and like having some on hand. But hiking, I would look for a compact pair, or a monocular.
I will be adding binoculars as well. I have some in my shooting bag, but definitely could use them in my GHB.
I will also be adding a form of communication. I'll have to check links and do some research, but i definitely need something that can pick up police scanner communications and/or additionally communicate with who I need to on the other end.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to proud Texan For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 12:12 AM
proud Texan proud Texan is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Texas
Age: 32
Posts: 25
Thanks: 7
Thanked 44 Times in 15 Posts
Default

There has been some discussion on how long it would take to travel this 25 mile distance. Although this distance could be traveled in one day by an individual accustomed to this type of travel. I will admit I am probably not. I am fairly fit and in good health, 31 years of age, but have no experience traveling this far on foot. I would be able to cover good ground in a normal daily world scenario. But like others have mentioned, if I'm traveling this distance on foot, the scenario being faced is going to be a bad one. So I plan on 3 days worth of prep with this GHB to get me home to my family and more supplies, although I'm completely open to suggestion for prep for a lengthier time. I appreciate all input that has been given and any additional that will be given.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to proud Texan For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 12:22 AM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Nuevo Alamo
Posts: 5,688
Thanks: 6,911
Thanked 13,347 Times in 4,315 Posts
Default

Put it this way....I've only had to used an epi-pen twice in twelve years working for the ambulance. If you want one in your home hospital kit that is great. But for a ultra bare bones GHB like this they are a ridiculous addition. He may as well keep some nitro tablets with him in case his smoking gives him a heart attack, or maybe some albuterol in case he develops asthma. Some Xanax would be good in case of panic attack. Maybe valium in case he gets a stress related seizure, all those things are more likely than needing an epi-pen. Once you start carrying things just in case for some specific aliment you could develope there is no end to it.

Quote:
A good multi-tool is a handy thing if you need a pile of non-ideal tools and need something that fits on the belt.
Oddly, even when I'm in my own shop filled with tools my leatherman, or leathermen as I often have two on me, is what I reach for as its easier than walking two steps over and opening a drawer to pull out a unitasker.

But in any case, having a some tools on your belt is EXACTLY what we are talking about here. A GHB is not a couple tool boxes worth of tools. A knife is handy but a leatherman has a knife and honestly you are more likely to need pliers, wire cutters or screwdrivers in our world than you are a knife.

We don't really live in a world of rope, hide, cloth, wooden pegs, etc. Its nuts, bolts, wires, screws, clips, etc that our world is made of. You're not likely to need to skin a deer, scrap the hide, and carve yourself a bone spear for your atlatal. But cutting a fence, taking off a bolt, stripping a wire, etc is highly likely in everyday life and particularly in SHTF. We are machine race in a machine world. The simple blade is almost obsolete as a tool at our technology level. Very few things we use these days can be fixed with a knife, and few obstacles can be defeated with one.

Quote:
You can get 25 miles in one day no problem (barring no crazy things happen)
This is for GHB....your walking 25 miles because something so bad has happened you can't just get in your car and drive, or call a friend to pick up you up.

So at a minimum our transportation and communication infrastructure has collapsed over a 25 mile area....Yeah....I would say you can absolutely guarantee that the crazy thing has already happened if you need to use your get home plan.

Maybe you can hope that all you have in store for you is a nice clean marathon to get home....but planning for that would be nuts in a SHTF situation. Two or three days is a lot more practical of a timeline.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Aerindel For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 12:24 AM
cannonfoddertfc's Avatar
cannonfoddertfc cannonfoddertfc is offline
Sheepdog in Wolf clothing
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,106
Thanks: 2,213
Thanked 2,298 Times in 790 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickB View Post
Hmm, thats fair. I took a lot of strolls like this in the military and just never got out of the habit. Granted i no longer go 20 miles in a single trip with 100lbs ruck lol.
You and me both brother, you and me both.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to cannonfoddertfc For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 12:39 AM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
Birds of a Feather
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,535
Thanks: 97
Thanked 847 Times in 514 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by proud Texan View Post
I've been LURKING a long time and dont really ever post, but I'm looking for constructive criticism on my GHB.
fixed.


Quote:
temps
seasonal modification of your bag is recommended. At minimum you might want to add some extra wool socks and a wool sweater for winter. SILK/wool mixtures and ECWCS layers are much enjoyed in the winter if you can get them surplus.

Quote:
distance 25 miles
pretty much a half day trip unless you run it as a marathon. You are looking somewhere between 5 and 10 hours.

All you really need is a water and a good pair of running shoes in the summer. Some high uv sun screen also. Your winters are also pretty mild so pretty much the same deal. Some happy snacks will help, something like and high calory like a good chocolate bar packs, candy. I find I move faster on an empty stomach. A camelpack or two might balance out your water.

Quote:
. I would plan on traveling on this rail track up until I would have to turn west and travel 11 miles through fence line and pasture land.
Roads often have better shoulders than rail but not sure of your situation. Walking across open land will be way more taxing.

Quote:
Here is a list of items in my GHB, along with a pic attached, with a total weight of about 20 lbs.
bit of a joke for 25 miles.



Quote:
-White tee and Black tee (depending on temps and safety measures needed)
I would go for active wear cause nipple burn sucks. Anythign antichaffing. Cotton sucks for activities where you are moving.
Quote:
-Can of Cashew nuts
-Oats and honey bars x5
Good taste on munchies.

Quote:
-Mason jar of water (approx 30 oz.)
Is this glass???

Quote:
-Gold bond powder
I like this too.

Quote:
-Cigarettes (yes i smoke unfortunately)
Try nicoteen patches might be more useful in that situation.



Most of the other stuff is elective, I'd consider that more for a longer distance GHB or BOB, but at 25 miles just why??? pear of roller blades would probably get you home faster.

Oh got to say you should spend a few weekends doing that trip (both ways if needed) to get a feel for what it will be like. Think what you can improve and what you don't like.

Rucking can be good exercise.

Also for you to say your smoking is unfortunate, just quit, if you can't quit smoking why the hell will you have the willpower to keep yourself alive cause you are basically killing yourself anyway.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-27-2019, 12:43 AM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Nuevo Alamo
Posts: 5,688
Thanks: 6,911
Thanked 13,347 Times in 4,315 Posts
Default

Quote:
I'm completely open to suggestion for prep for a lengthier time. I appreciate all input that has been given and any additional that will be given.
A longer time is likely but things get exponentially harder as the time increases.

For more time you need more food....but carrying more food makes you slower....so you need even more food to compensate for being slower...

You don't need twice as much water for twice the duration of travel....you need something like three times more water because carrying that water means you move slower, and consume more of it....which means you have to carry more of it....which means you move slower...

Very quickly it becomes impossible to simply carry more food and water and any extra duration, and thus distance, relies on supply drops or foraging.

Which brings up cacheing. I don't know if you've considered it or not, but having a cache or two on you route is a very good idea. Particularly if you become separated from you GHB and have to travel some of your route with nothing but whats in your pockets.

Ideally, you would have a friendly safehouse on the route where you could not only cache gear, but stay the night or longer.

Even better....is a rescue resource of some kind. My wife and I have a system worked out with two way radios and markers placed on expected routes.

If one of us fails to come home during a SHTF, the other heads out on the GH route and looks for markers left by the other party working their way home on foot. The markers indicate the other party is hidden off road in the area...and with high power two way radios we would then coordinate pickup.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Aerindel For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 01:16 AM
Astronomy Astronomy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Pineland Expat
Posts: 4,743
Thanks: 4,148
Thanked 15,229 Times in 3,773 Posts
Default

Just for informational purposes, I've used 550 lb paracord boot laces since the 1970s. For hard use hiking/infantry/ski-touring boot wear.

It works just fine. Very tough and durable laces.

When you first go to thread 550 cord through footwear eyelets, heat the end of the cord with a lighter until it actually catches fire (much like a candle wick). Then blow the flame out and rapidly wipe off the melted bubble of hot nylon formed at the end... by dragging it across any surface besides your own bare skin. That stuff is hot and it sticks to anything like molten lava.

You'll be left with a hard (cooled plastic) & fine tipped spear point (like a sharpened pencil end) that will thread through eyelets easily. After you get your boots/shoes threaded... re-light each lace end, blow out the flame again, and allow a small newly formed blob of molten nylon to form on the lace's running end. Spinning the cord between thumb & forefinger, blow on the hot blob to cool it off & form a nicely rounded "tip" that will seal the end of the cord and prevent it from fraying.

Works like a charm.

----------

My critique on listed GHB:

Quote:
I live in north east Texas so winter climate is mild. Generally upper 30's to mid 40's during the day and lower 30's during the night.
I've lived/worked in W/SE/NE Texas, SW Oklahoma, E/S Kansas, N Mississippi, and NW Arkansas... so I think I've got a handle on your terrain & climate. My comments reflect that familiarity with your landscape.

Quote:
My distance of travel from work to home, which is almost the only travel I do other than going to town, is 25 miles total...
Getting home is your Mission. Your Concept of Operations. It will take a world gone upside down to ever force you to travel that route entirely on foot. However, I think such a worst case plan is a wise one to have in your hip-pocket.

Depending upon your physical fitness, weather conditions, security threats, & "event" particulars... 25 miles could be done in anywhere from one big push in a single day... to a more cautious (or scenario limited) 2-3 days of movement. In any event, you MUST plan for spending one or more rest periods bivouacked somewhere out under open skies. Because...

No matter how fast/far you think you can move on a normal day... Murphy gets a vote. Sprained ankle. Walking while deathly ill with fever & diarrhea. Bad weather. Bad people. Stress. Onset hypothermia. Out of water. Physical obstacles caused by some disaster. Somebody else randomly attached to you by fate...who can only move so fast.

I'd advise you to strongly consider travelling at night (dusk until dawn) during hot seasons and especially during any potentially violent scenario. Moving at night is cooler, requires less water consumption, and avoids the likelihood of incurring heat injuries. It also cloaks you in protective darkness during what is quiet sleep time for most people & livestock.

Job #1 is to get home. As quickly as circumstances will allow. That's all you need to accomplish.

It's not a recreational hike. It's not a camp-out. It's not a bushcraft adventure. You won't be wearing anything out or making big repairs to trail-worn gear on a 1-3 day hike. You don't need to forage for anything but water and you don't need to establish or construct any significant camps or extravagant shelter. You just need to survive the elements, avoid people problems, find discrete hidey holes to temporarily rest at, take care of your feet, and negotiate any obstacles along your path.

You don't need to conduct any personal hygiene that doesn't involve keeping you from becoming a mobility kill. In other words, stuff to care for feet & nethers.

Shoot (if you must), Move (as far & fast as conditions allow), Communicate (with home if possible)... and catch some needed rest & water when required.

In the final analysis, assuming you were in excellent shape, you could do the entire trip in shorts, running shoes, and wearing a small hydration pack with filter/chemical water treatment, some spare warm clothing items, and energy snacks. A walk, jog, run, walk, jog, run marathon home (at least during warm dry weather).

My comments on your listed 20ish pounds of items...

LOSE:

-White tee and Black tee (Long sleeve shirt instead to protect from sunburn/wind/insects/cold)
-Can opener (To open what? Are you carrying cans that need one? Multi-tool will already open cans)
-30 oz. Mason jar of water (Wrong container; way too little water)
-Water life straw (there are better filters & treatments that are just as affordable)
-Wet wipes (Don't need; I endured months of Ranger School & SFQC without Wet Wipes... you can make 25 miles without them)
-Hand sanitizer (Don't need; you won't die without it)
-Rubber gloves (Why? Will you die without these?)
-Dust mask (Only if you expect a dust/ash storm)
-Zipties (For what exactly? Not needed)
-Electrical tape (For what exactly? Not needed)
-Mini Hatchet multi tool (redundant weight; you have a knife & a multi-tool)
-Knife sharpener (you won't wear out any edged tools in 1-3 days of primarily foot movement)
-Low light/red lense light (get an inexpensive Walmart/Home Depot LED headlamp with red light function instead; or a better, but still affordable, Pinceton Tech or Petzl headlamp with colored LEDs)
-Spare AA and AAA batteries (very unlikely to need within three days; don't walk using a light; MKI eyeballs instead)

ADD:

Sunscreen
A small bottle of generic Motrin (at least 50 tablets; you'll thank me if you ever have to march on sore muscles, sprain, or pulled back)
A small blister pack of Benedryl tablets for insect stings, contact plant poison reactions, and to make you sleep when you are too stressed to do so naturally
Sawyer Squeeze filter (much better flow rate & clogging resistance than Sawyer Mini; far superior to a Life Straw)
Water containers (canteens or hydration bladder for a bare bones minimum of 3 carried quarts)
Water treatment tablets for minimum of 12 quarts (4 quarts per day x 3 days; iodine or chlorine dioxide tabs; a 50 tablet bottle of iodine tabs will treat 50 quarts, costs a few dollars, and weighs less than an ounce)
Small AM/FM/SW/WX radio w/ earbud to remain apprised of weather/emergency/disaster info
Rain jacket & fleece hat
Bivy Sack for minimalist shelter (USGI ECWS or SOL; 'bout $60 for either): https://www.surviveoutdoorslonger.co...-od-green.html
Blister Kit (foot maintenance)
Mini binos or monocular (to scan terrain ahead of you)
Sleeping bag, blanket, or poncho liner for cold/winter weather; use inside bivy sack; closed cell foam ground pad for cold weather use under sleep system
Cloth cravat or neck scarf (for use as head/neck protection from hot sun, wipe rag for hygiene, arm sling, bandage, dust mask, pre-filter, and a hundred other things...)

Plan your gear around a cold camp... no fires. Unless you absolutely have to have one to keep from freezing to death. Fires attract trouble and strangers.

I gathered water in the field for decades using nothing more than military issue iodine tabs (still affordably sold in every Walmart camping/sporting gear aisle in the land under the Coghlan's Brand). You can too. Filters are nice, but rarely critical. I could give a crap about most other contaminants ingested across a few days. I'll live. However, filters (in addition to tablets) are invaluable if you have to procure water from Texas livestock ponds... teeming with iodine resistant bad bugs that can make you very sick... very quickly.

If you intend to conduct a foot march across East Texas for 25 miles (especially during hot weather), I absolutely guarantee that you will chug a minimum of 3-4 quarts of water per 24 hour period, even travelling in the cooler hours of the night.

You have 4 major threats during such a march:

1. Mobility kills (feet torn up by long miles; eyes damaged; sprains, chaffing of groin, thighs, or ass; also gastro-intestinal distress from bad water)

2. Thermoregulation (exposure to solar radiation, precipitation, or extreme hot/cold temperatures)

3. People Troubles

4. Dehydration

As long as you can mitigate those 4 things, you'll make it home. Anything else is gravy.

Most of your list looks pretty good. You have a few things you don't need, and a few you probably could. Assuming fair weather, you could make it 25 miles home, travelling at night, carrying next to nothing besides water, water tablets, a pair of spare socks, headlamp, and a weapon.

Hope some of the above helps.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Astronomy For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 01:43 AM
proud Texan proud Texan is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Texas
Age: 32
Posts: 25
Thanks: 7
Thanked 44 Times in 15 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamAshley View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by proud Texan View Post
I've been LURKING a long time and dont really ever post, but I'm looking for constructive criticism on my GHB.
fixed.


Quote:
temps
seasonal modification of your bag is recommended. At minimum you might want to add some extra wool socks and a wool sweater for winter. SILK/wool mixtures and ECWCS layers are much enjoyed in the winter if you can get them surplus.

Quote:
distance 25 miles
pretty much a half day trip unless you run it as a marathon. You are looking somewhere between 5 and 10 hours.

All you really need is a water and a good pair of running shoes in the summer. Some high uv sun screen also. Your winters are also pretty mild so pretty much the same deal. Some happy snacks will help, something like and high calory like a good chocolate bar packs, candy. I find I move faster on an empty stomach. A camelpack or two might balance out your water.

Quote:
. I would plan on traveling on this rail track up until I would have to turn west and travel 11 miles through fence line and pasture land.
Roads often have better shoulders than rail but not sure of your situation. Walking across open land will be way more taxing.

Quote:
Here is a list of items in my GHB, along with a pic attached, with a total weight of about 20 lbs.
bit of a joke for 25 miles.



Quote:
-White tee and Black tee (depending on temps and safety measures needed)
I would go for active wear cause nipple burn sucks. Anythign antichaffing. Cotton sucks for activities where you are moving.
Quote:
-Can of Cashew nuts
-Oats and honey bars x5
Good taste on munchies.

Quote:
-Mason jar of water (approx 30 oz.)
Is this glass???

Quote:
-Gold bond powder
I like this too.

Quote:
-Cigarettes (yes i smoke unfortunately)
Try nicoteen patches might be more useful in that situation.



Most of the other stuff is elective, I'd consider that more for a longer distance GHB or BOB, but at 25 miles just why??? pear of roller blades would probably get you home faster.

Oh got to say you should spend a few weekends doing that trip (both ways if needed) to get a feel for what it will be like. Think what you can improve and what you don't like.

Rucking can be good exercise.

Also for you to say your smoking is unfortunate, just quit, if you can't quit smoking why the hell will you have the willpower to keep yourself alive cause you are basically killing yourself anyway.
WilliamAshley.
I respect you input and agree on things.
Additional cold weather gear is on the list of things to do. Extra wool socks and good idea on the will hoodie for better warmth.
The distance to be traveled would be under SHTF scenario, possibly EMP, Nuke in a much further location, or who knows what else could happen. But the purpose is to get home on foot under a severe circumstance in which my vehicle is completely immobile or at some point I have to ditch it and move on foot due to unforeseen reasons with no capability of being picked up. In this instance I would prefer not to be rolling down the road way on roller blades that would be very difficult to run or move in. I could be wrong but I feel walking the track out of sight of the road way with the tree line in between may be better than the road way under severe circumstances. Although this is good means of travel if the circumstance allows, and I appreciate the idea. As for the 25 mile hike home, I believe under a SHTF scenario this distance could take longer to complete. I personally could foresee between 2-3 days, but I am asking for guidance and open to theory. I would like to be prepared with 20 lbs of things that could help me survive, and not slow me down too much, but open to cutting anything that is not needed and additional weight, than not have anything but a few snacks and be in a bad situation. I seriously dont mean any disrespect and hope you dont take it that way. I just want to further explain my situation of preparedness.

As for the smoking, yeah it's a horrible habit, it's bad for my health, and people die from it daily. I hate being chained to the habit and maybe one day I will quit, God knows I would love to. But being a smoker and wanting to prepare and survive anything that may come does not have anything to do with one another. What about people that drink several sodas a day. That's a horrible habit too that can bring upon health issues. I dont drink soda at all. I eat healthy and stay active, but I do smoke. We all have our vices, just because I smoke doesn't mean I shouldn't prepare to survive a catastrophic event.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-27-2019, 06:55 AM
dontbuypotteryfromme's Avatar
dontbuypotteryfromme dontbuypotteryfromme is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Far north queensland Australia
Posts: 20,193
Thanks: 4,427
Thanked 15,826 Times in 8,395 Posts
Default

An idea to keep you walking would be some light weight sticks, blister kit, pain medication,good clothing and a crap ton of strapping tape.

So it may be you might want to dedicate some room and weight towards just the idea of having these tools that keep you moving over better sleeping, cooking and supplies like that.

It is a trade off.

Do you guys do long sleeve fishing shirts? Because they are straight up the business for hot weather.

https://www.bcf.com.au/p/bcf-mens-ma...cgid=BCF060505

And I also second the recommendation for those longer lycra undies.

They control the change and are a bit less traumatic for spectators if you have to get a bit naked.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to dontbuypotteryfromme For This Useful Post:
Old 05-27-2019, 04:15 PM
Tactical Lever Tactical Lever is online now
Wearing fur underwears...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NW of most; in God's country
Posts: 2,358
Thanks: 4,418
Thanked 2,264 Times in 1,151 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerindel View Post
Put it this way....I've only had to used an epi-pen twice in twelve years working for the ambulance. If you want one in your home hospital kit that is great. But for a ultra bare bones GHB like this they are a ridiculous addition. He may as well keep some nitro tablets with him in case his smoking gives him a heart attack, or maybe some albuterol in case he develops asthma. Some Xanax would be good in case of panic attack. Maybe valium in case he gets a stress related seizure, all those things are more likely than needing an epi-pen. Once you start carrying things just in case for some specific aliment you could develope there is no end to it.
Well I didn't need an epi-pen either, but I did have to drive myself to the hospital. Before that, I wasn't allergic to anything. My wife developed cold eucardia not too long ago, some of our friends have deadly allergies, and allergies have been on the rise for the last couple decades.

I don't understand the pushback on something that weighs less that a loaded 45-70 round. Might not be likely, but it is probably as likely as needing the pistol, or the 2nd mag.

You could probably carry a few pill for each of the ailments you listed, which is a little ridiculous, but that was what you were shooting for, right? The reductio ad absurdum argument. But if you think about it, it's not really.

A half dozen loratadine pills, and and a few aspirin along with the epi-pen weigh about as much as three 9 mm cartridges.

Quote:
Oddly, even when I'm in my own shop filled with tools my leatherman, or leathermen as I often have two on me, is what I reach for as its easier than walking two steps over and opening a drawer to pull out a unitasker.

But in any case, having a some tools on your belt is EXACTLY what we are talking about here. A GHB is not a couple tool boxes worth of tools. A knife is handy but a leatherman has a knife and honestly you are more likely to need pliers, wire cutters or screwdrivers in our world than you are a knife.

We don't really live in a world of rope, hide, cloth, wooden pegs, etc. Its nuts, bolts, wires, screws, clips, etc that our world is made of. You're not likely to need to skin a deer, scrap the hide, and carve yourself a bone spear for your atlatal. But cutting a fence, taking off a bolt, stripping a wire, etc is highly likely in everyday life and particularly in SHTF. We are machine race in a machine world. The simple blade is almost obsolete as a tool at our technology level. Very few things we use these days can be fixed with a knife, and few obstacles can be defeated with one.
When you're on foot, you shouldn't have to cut a fence, you're only going to round a bolt with the plier (just where are you finding these bolts on a walk home??) and if you decide to do some emergency wire stripping, a knife works just fine. I know I've stripped much more wire with a pocket knife than with wire strippers.

I'd much rather have a useful blade rather than a non-locking afterthought meant to cut fingers off...

And don't even think of using that automotive Philips on your gun. You'll bugger up all the screws, as it's not straight cut like a proper gunsmithing driver is. Carry a pocket gunsmith tool if you must.

Just don't see the utility of one once you're on foot. Tune up your hikers? Ditch the extra weight.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-27-2019, 04:19 PM
Tactical Lever Tactical Lever is online now
Wearing fur underwears...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NW of most; in God's country
Posts: 2,358
Thanks: 4,418
Thanked 2,264 Times in 1,151 Posts
Default

Make sure that you have good hiking socks. They aren't cheap, but good ones that don't move, bunch up or slide around are invaluable on a long hike.

Add a small set of fold up scissors for the first aid kit. Maybe a tick removal tool if they are a concern there.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-27-2019, 04:45 PM
WilliamAshley WilliamAshley is offline
Birds of a Feather
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,535
Thanks: 97
Thanked 847 Times in 514 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by proud Texan View Post
WilliamAshley.
I respect you input and agree on things.
Additional cold weather gear is on the list of things to do. Extra wool socks and good idea on the will hoodie for better warmth.
Is your hoodie wind/water proof, if not consider a cold/wet level 5?6 or equivalent layer that will not get wet.

Quote:
The distance to be traveled would be under SHTF scenario, possibly EMP
HOLD UP!!! NO no no. If a nuke goes off, do not start a day long trek home that is just utterly stupid. You are far better off to stock food and water and some other essential nuke supplies in your car. Think about modifying your car or having a modification plan for your vehicle so it will still be operable in event of the nuke.

Check out nuclear war survival skills. Learn how to make a radiation detector or buy one. Shovel(s) tarp etc..

SHELTER IN PLACE. find locations in your immediate work vicinity that you can shelter in for days or weeks if required. The absolute last think you want to do is head out into a fallout zone after a nuclear attack. Likewise if there is a major EMP event, wait it out. If you have family you are trying to get to, have a "regrouping plan" and a communications plan. 25 miles is not a long distance but you are not going to want to be travelling during an emergency or major scale war event. Wait it out, have food and water in your vehicle to last you a couple weeks.




Quote:
Nuke in a much further location, or who knows what else could happen. But the purpose is to get home on foot under a severe circumstance in which my vehicle is completely immobile or at some point I have to ditch it and move on foot due to unforeseen reasons with no capability of being picked up. In this instance I would prefer not to be rolling down the road way on roller blades that would be very difficult to run or move in. I could be wrong but I feel walking the track out of sight of the road way with the tree line in between may be better than the road way under severe circumstances. Although this is good means of travel if the circumstance allows, and I appreciate the idea. As for the 25 mile hike home, I believe under a SHTF scenario this distance could take longer to complete. I personally could foresee between 2-3 days, but I am asking for guidance and open to theory. I would like to be prepared with 20 lbs of things that could help me survive, and not slow me down too much, but open to cutting anything that is not needed and additional weight, than not have anything but a few snacks and be in a bad situation. I seriously dont mean any disrespect and hope you dont take it that way. I just want to further explain my situation of preparedness.
If its just getting home get home. This may require fitness and activity. Try jogging regularly get in shape, ditch smoking and plan a rapid return if required. If possible store a bike in your vehicle a 25 mile trip on bike shouldn't take that long.

But totally don't go heading out into the jungle when nukes are flying that is a recipe for painful death. (Bear in mind if you are in the strike zone or will be in a major falloutzone, different set of rules)

You might want to throw in a disposable rain kit also for immediate fall out issues. Dealing with a nuke is far more involved than a regular GH situation.


Quote:
As for the smoking, yeah it's a horrible habit, it's bad for my health, and people die from it daily. I hate being chained to the habit and maybe one day I will quit, God knows I would love to. But being a smoker and wanting to prepare and survive anything that may come does not have anything to do with one another. What about people that drink several sodas a day. That's a horrible habit too that can bring upon health issues. I dont drink soda at all. I eat healthy and stay active, but I do smoke. We all have our vices, just because I smoke doesn't mean I shouldn't prepare to survive a catastrophic event.
yeah whatever everyone dies. I was a social smoker once upon a time. I quit cold turkey. I was a vegan at one point (I know illegal in texas) in fact now I am also pretty much vegan but for different reasons, it takes some will to live lifestyles that are "healthy" at the end of the day it is a choice. Building willpower is probably the #1 survival skill.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net