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Old 05-19-2019, 05:23 PM
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I love your purchase - the biggest factors for you biting off more than you can chew are your health and experience.

Either way if you do plan to give it a go I would look to things like :

Satellite phone for emergencies (a must)
If you have the $$ put a decent trailer/rv in the barn for the first winter in case the house really isn't up to snuff for living in yet.
If $$ allows have a LARGE lp or propane tank installed for heat and cooking. Connect to house and/or barn depending on where you end up.
Multiple generators - main and backup(s).
Have at least 4 months of food and water put away for winter. (not hard or to much $$)
A winter capable means of transportation, truck/atv/ski-mobile
A guard dog for the place - many uses.
If you don't know how to hunt get someone to teach you - asap!
Meet you neighbors, as many as you can. Bring pies or whatever and get all the advice you can. (You've already started this - well done)
Be sure you can get medical help(sat phone) when you need it due to your ages.

Good luck - I hope it works out for you. Keep us updated when you can!
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:25 PM
Christian Christian is offline
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I've decided to get a satellite phone, a 4-wheel drive pickup truck, a 500 gallon propane tank (if deliverable), a tri-fuel 3kw generator, and enough of a garden to supply carbs and vitamins. I've raised geese, rabbits and St Croix hair sheep in the past, so keeping a half-dozen sheep to eat their lambs would get me a low maintenance meat supply. Security is a concern since the post office doesn't even deliver this far out, but I've got an AR, a 1911, and a 454 Casull magnum revolver. Would feel better if I knew of an outdoor wood furnace design accepting big fat logs and only needing feeding twice a week. The ancient big barn has an obvious shotgun hole in the tin roof, so there may be some yahoos out here to keep an eye on.
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Old 05-19-2019, 08:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian View Post
I've decided to get a satellite phone, a 4-wheel drive pickup truck, a 500 gallon propane tank (if deliverable), a tri-fuel 3kw generator, and enough of a garden to supply carbs and vitamins. I've raised geese, rabbits and St Croix hair sheep in the past, so keeping a half-dozen sheep to eat their lambs would get me a low maintenance meat supply. Security is a concern since the post office doesn't even deliver this far out, but I've got an AR, a 1911, and a 454 Casull magnum revolver. Would feel better if I knew of an outdoor wood furnace design accepting big fat logs and only needing feeding twice a week. The ancient big barn has an obvious shotgun hole in the tin roof, so there may be some yahoos out here to keep an eye on.
Personally I would do two 1000 gallon tanks buried if possible. You may not need it filled every year but itís nice and secure and you get a discount at a higher delivered rate. Plus only getting them out once a year maybe all you can get on unimproved roads. Sounds like you will possibly have to gut the electric in the house. If thatís the case, or you need to get into the walls, think about running propane lines for lights as well as a wall heater in the bedroom, if not others. There will be days where the both of you are sick and wonít/canít get out of bed to feed the fire.

I hope it all works out well for you!
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Old 05-19-2019, 10:32 PM
Florida Jean Florida Jean is online now
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My grandfather started building his last house when he was 70 [only worked on it in the summer -- first house was finished when he was 19].

Also, grandfather put his garage right near the road [earlier house] so it was easier to get the car out and going. Of course, you had to walk all the way from the house to the garage, but now adays there are snow mobiles and such. They did use a sled to haul groceries back to the house in the winter. This house was north of Pittsburgh. Yes, there was snow. Road was gravel so didn't need that much plowing.

How much sun does your road get? Will cutting down a few select trees on your property increase the sun load on the road? Ditto around the house. Have at least 2 heat sources.

Sounds nice.
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Old 05-19-2019, 10:40 PM
Florida Jean Florida Jean is online now
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My grandfather started building his last house when he was 70 [only worked on it in the summer -- first house was finished when he was 19].

Also, grandfather put his garage right near the road [earlier house] so it was easier to get the car out and going. Of course, you had to walk all the way from the house to the garage, but now adays there are snow mobiles and such. They did use a sled to haul groceries back to the house in the winter. This house was north of Pittsburgh. Yes, there was snow. Road was gravel so didn't need that much plowing.

How much sun does your road get? Will cutting down a few select trees on your property increase the sun load on the road? Ditto around the house. Have at least 2 heat sources.

Sounds nice.
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian View Post
I've decided to get a satellite phone, a 4-wheel drive pickup truck, a 500 gallon propane tank (if deliverable), a tri-fuel 3kw generator, and enough of a garden to supply carbs and vitamins. I've raised geese, rabbits and St Croix hair sheep in the past, so keeping a half-dozen sheep to eat their lambs would get me a low maintenance meat supply. Security is a concern since the post office doesn't even deliver this far out, but I've got an AR, a 1911, and a 454 Casull magnum revolver. Would feel better if I knew of an outdoor wood furnace design accepting big fat logs and only needing feeding twice a week. The ancient big barn has an obvious shotgun hole in the tin roof, so there may be some yahoos out here to keep an eye on.
If you can handle are 454 casull with full loads I guess you are not too feeble.
As already stated you want not just a dog, but functional dogs that will spend the night outside. Normally I would say they do not have to be big, but with your isolation there will be dog eating critters around, especially large canine packs about: either coyote, wild dog, or these days of hybrids. Especially if you plan to have sheep. You likely want the sheep locked up at night since there will most likely be lion out there also.
The most important thing for the dogs is their ability to warn of approaching intruders of 2- and 4-legged types.
A pack of great Pyrenees might fill the bill since they would not bother the sheep. A couple of big domestic cats would be good also to have around. Likely there are copper heads and rattlers around too. For those in that part of the country if not present get some of the local large fat black snakes that should take care of the copper heads and also your rats.
Be careful of the ticks that spread lyme disease. A bad case of it could ruin your plans for sure. Most get over it, but not all.

Best of luck.
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Old 05-20-2019, 02:09 AM
randolphrowzeebragg randolphrowzeebragg is offline
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If you already bought the property, it's pointless to question of whether or not buying the property was a good idea. You never know what your limits are until you test yourself. What happens now is you stop questioning yourself and get to work. Prioritize what needs to be done, and attack the first things on the list. Since most major projects require some prep work like buying materials, parts, etc. that's where you start. Before you attempt to do anything you aren't familiar with, spend time doing research so you accomplish your tasks as efficiently as possible.
I've known people who have attempted major lifestyle changes who spend a big part of their time daydreaming about what needs to be done instead of doing it.
After you go to work, you'll know before long whether or not you can do the work necessary to make yourself a happy home.
I look at it as an adventure, so keep a positive attitude, a smile on your face, and remember that there thousands of people who would love to be in your position.
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Old 05-20-2019, 04:23 AM
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Recommend you think through potential emergency medical needs. If it is so remote that the mail isn't delivered and there is no cell reception then a "help, I've fallen and I can't get up" situation could be very bad.
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Old 05-20-2019, 06:16 AM
Cat wrangler Cat wrangler is offline
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Rabbits might be another source of easily protected meat. Just be careful to have a source of fat.
I cannot tell you how many times I have asked myself if I took on too much. Basically my whole life. I still jump into things with both feet and usually manage to get through it. Reassessing and prioritizing are not bad. Putting one foot in front of the other keeps forward movement. There are always setbacks.
Do you have family that are close?
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Old 05-20-2019, 07:49 AM
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Congrats!
Animals require good fencing...
Chasing after the livestock and repairing fences is a good way to get exercise and that keeps us healthy and youthful.

As was said in an earlier post... Having the acreage doesn't mean that you must do anything with it.

Being snowed in over the winter doesn't sound like a bad thing....

I'm Jealous...
West virginia is a damn nice area.... If you aren't downstream from one of those mountaintop removal sites...
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Old 05-20-2019, 08:13 AM
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Sound great , we are all in the same boat .
I think one day you will die on your land or in a nursing home ,my grand mother lived in the concrete jungle Brooklyn ny till she was 93 years old , then the nursing home 3 years .
She walk every where , carried every thing home with a cart , she walked to the homeless shelter to cook at 100 to make dinner for a few 100 home less people then walk back in the dark . O ya she was blind and deaf in her 80s .
Iím planing my retirement , at57 6/7 years to go .
Iím in the Catskills we get heavy snow here and -0 good part of the winter .
You need a 4x4 truck to get in and out .
Iím 1800í up a Jeep trail and a few mile from a paved road .
Most of the winter the snow is no big deal .
I push snow once a week unless there is a big storm then I push snow 6Ē at a time .
We have been snowed in and out 3 times in 4 years .
My wife is sickly but she may end up in a nursing home before me they are 30 min away ,
I am off grid and run on solar it works real good , I can get some cell service with a single repeater .
The biggest thing is getting the house in order , you could by food if you canít get much food growing .
Post some pics of the house I would love to see it .
I would of loved a old cabin but my wife wanted a new house , so my cabin has 3 baths and 2800 feet . Plus garage .
Make a plan that you can accomplish Dally weekly yearly and try to stick with it .
All the luck John
Every one Is different ,
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Old 05-20-2019, 08:46 AM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is offline
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Hardy stove will take huge rounds directly from the tractor bucket 1x/day.

Friends of Mine in their 70's heat this way.

Needs electricity, so still have a backup wood stove
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Old 05-20-2019, 09:19 AM
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I have friends who retired and bought a large parcel of undeveloped property in an area similar to yours. Heck, they might even be your neighbor.

Other than having a section logged to clear the area for their homestead they have done all work themselves. And amazing work they have done!
They've built living quarters, livestock buildings, raised beds, etc. They raise chickens, rabbits, sheep and a couple hogs. Generator for when the power is out. They have a portable sawmill that they use to cut all their own lumber.

These are two retired folks in their late 60's/early 70's who had no prior homesteading experience. He had some building related experience in his work life.

They have had one emergency situation a couple years ago when she had a heart attack. The local rescue squad got her to the hospital in time. After that I suggested they look into something I had been reading about at the time.
Insurance through an Air Medical Evac network. It was pretty affordable and ideal for their situation.
https://www.airmedcarenetwork.com/ap...caAjnaEALw_wcB

That might be something for you to look into as well.


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Old 05-20-2019, 10:12 AM
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There is nothing wrong with the homesteading plans of the OP. I am doing much the same here in eastern oklahoma.

I wish to pass on some lessons I have learned since I retired and moved here 4 yrs ago,
Water is life, have a good well dug, or cleaned out, and store water in an above ground tank.
Have at least 3 ways to cook and heat your home.
Buy suitable equipment to allow you to mow, clear ground, dig trenches, clear snow, and lift and carry heavy items.
Repair your entrance drive to support year round access, concrete trucks, Fedex/Ups, and emergency service vehicles.
Support the local fire dept.
Buy LifeFyte insurance.
Emergency Communications, Satphone, Ham Radio, Mobile radios in vehicles.
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:05 PM
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Default Hang in there and prep

Prepare for the worst, hope for the best, have redundant systems and pray
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Old 05-23-2019, 08:42 PM
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yep, im 59 and prob. wouldnt do it unless i could put in a backup gen and enough fuel to run it for 3 months. you might want to think about paying someone to put in a hydro gen on your creek.
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Old 05-26-2019, 02:18 PM
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Yes, you bit off more than you can chew. Sometimes that little voice is a wakeup call.

I'm 67 years old, my dad and mom are about to cross over into their 90's. She has lost her mobility. He has lost his mind.
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Old 05-26-2019, 04:11 PM
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good for you!! though concerning communication you may want to consider setting up internet through satellite , relatively inexpensive.
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Old 05-26-2019, 10:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lava View Post
Are you generally fit and active? If so you will be fine
I live in a place with a lot of snow. We got 40' in February. Shoveling hurts in December but by March everyone is a stud! If you live in hard places your buddy will adjust.
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Old 05-27-2019, 08:07 AM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian View Post
Just bought 50 acres in extremely rural West Virginia. 16 miles from any cell phone reception in any direction. 2 miles from a paved road. Had to give the power company GPS coordinates to turn on the grid power here. 10 acres grass, 40 acres of very mountainous woods, huge fast flowing creek, and a 100+ year old worn out tiny farmhouse. Working pump well on back porch. The stuff in the old barn is ancient, like from the 1800s. Scythes and 3 foot long manual wood saws. I want to raise a dozen sheep for meat. Lotsa oaks for acorns and black walnuts trees for survival protein. Want to plant a survival garden. Heaven? We moved here because we think bad times are soon coming. Closest local who lives 1.5 miles away says the road in (1 car width gravel/dirt) is NEVER snow plowed and power in winter sometimes goes out for days. I'm 66 years old, my wife is 70 and we are kinda scared. Have we bit off more than we can chew?



You might have but since you are old enough to have good sense, you'll likely do OK.

Much depends on your present physical health and you ability to accomplish work. You actually can get healthier with the physical work demands plus a good diet from your home grown food. Your chronological ages do not mean as much as present health.

Money is a big factor. You need enough to buy supplies and equipment plus maybe hire some help to get some important things done. Don't rely on nuts and acorns. Plan to grow a big garden. Clear ground if necessary but invariably those old homesteads had a garden site. Might be overgrown with trees but likely the best spot for your garden. Flowing creek is a huge asset. Should have trout if you described it accurately.

I say congratulations for tackling the task. How much are both of you used to living away from the city (and it sounds like you will be more remote than most)? I know of plenty of people even beyond your years who successfully live remotely. Are you planning to live there full time right away?

You WILL get old so cross that bridge when necessary. We're all going to die at some point and if you do it right you can delay that inevitability for quite a few more years. A good 4 wheel drive pickup with a snow plow will be invaluable.
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