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Old 12-01-2017, 11:38 AM
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In case of SHTF there will be no FCC enforcement so it might be wise for preppers to have info on gear that would be best for communications in that scenario. All Hams are not preppers so the bands may not be crowded. As for me I have no clue as to what sort of gear, frequencies, power and etc would be adequate and have no interest in Ham radio as a hobby as long as civilization continues. I might purchase a rig and use it for receive only until that day arrives.
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Old 12-01-2017, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
In case of SHTF there will be no FCC enforcement so it might be wise for preppers to have info on gear that would be best for communications in that scenario. All Hams are not preppers so the bands may not be crowded. As for me I have no clue as to what sort of gear, frequencies, power and etc would be adequate and have no interest in Ham radio as a hobby as long as civilization continues. I might purchase a rig and use it for receive only until that day arrives.
The idea that you can purchase a radio now and figure out how to use it when you need it is unwise. What do you do if you have to move to another location for whatever reason and you don't know how to properly set up an antenna? What if you have to replace a coax connector and don't have the supplies/skill to do it? What if your antenna is destroyed and you have no idea how to build a home brew version?

As easy as it is to get a Technician HAM license I have no idea why anyone interested in self sufficiency/prepping wouldn't get one. It's not like it takes a college course to get one. Load the free app on your phone or computer, put in an hour or two of study every night for 2 weeks and go pass the test. IMO it's easier than the Drivers License exam.
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Old 12-01-2017, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
In case of SHTF there will be no FCC enforcement so it might be wise for preppers to have info on gear that would be best for communications in that scenario. All Hams are not preppers so the bands may not be crowded. As for me I have no clue as to what sort of gear, frequencies, power and etc would be adequate and have no interest in Ham radio as a hobby as long as civilization continues. I might purchase a rig and use it for receive only until that day arrives.
To be blunt this post is full of fail.

We in the south just went through several, what were to us, full blown SHTF situations this year. Society did not collapse and law enforcement was still active.

Bands may not be crowded, intruders are still not well tolerated. Amateur radio is still a self policing service. You will be warned then reported to the authorities. And yes, short of a all out TEOTWAWKI event there will still be an active and functional government to enforce the laws, rules, regulations.

By your own admission you have no clue. When the SHTF is not the time to try to find one. Listening will still not give you a clue as to who will be able to hear you when the time comes you need to call for help.

Get your license, build a station, get on the air to find out how well it works, make changes as needed, rinse and repeat. Nobody says you have to dedicate all your free time to making it as a hobby. You do need to get on enough to figure out what frequencies at which times will get you where you want to be.
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Old 12-01-2017, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
In case of SHTF there will be no FCC enforcement so it might be wise for preppers to have info on gear that would be best for communications in that scenario. All Hams are not preppers so the bands may not be crowded. As for me I have no clue as to what sort of gear, frequencies, power and etc would be adequate and have no interest in Ham radio as a hobby as long as civilization continues. I might purchase a rig and use it for receive only until that day arrives.
I own a Baofeng radio and it is crap. Now that I've got that out of the way. I also have experience with Kenwood and Yaesu VHF/UHF radios. I prefer Yaesu but would buy Kenwood again.

My recommendation: Go get a Yaesu FT-70. $199, dual band, automatic digital/analog voice. You can download the user and advanced user manuals online. If you want cheaper but without the digital capability, the FT-60 at around $150 can be had. Again documentation is free online.

Don't screw yourself out of the real fun and pride of building your own antennas for your new radio. Lots of people with expertise will be happy to help you enjoy the hobby and learn to operate well.
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Old 12-01-2017, 08:34 PM
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I've had a Yaesu VX-6r for 3 years and it has been flawless. I made several home-brew antennas and they all work very well. Buy a quality radio, you won't regret it.
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Old 12-02-2017, 11:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDH View Post
To be blunt this post is full of fail.

We in the south just went through several, what were to us, full blown SHTF situations this year. Society did not collapse and law enforcement was still active.

Bands may not be crowded, intruders are still not well tolerated. Amateur radio is still a self policing service. You will be warned then reported to the authorities. And yes, short of a all out TEOTWAWKI event there will still be an active and functional government to enforce the laws, rules, regulations.

By your own admission you have no clue. When the SHTF is not the time to try to find one. Listening will still not give you a clue as to who will be able to hear you when the time comes you need to call for help.

Get your license, build a station, get on the air to find out how well it works, make changes as needed, rinse and repeat. Nobody says you have to dedicate all your free time to making it as a hobby. You do need to get on enough to figure out what frequencies at which times will get you where you want to be.
Not only this, but getting hooked up with local groups, repeaters, learning who's who by voice, meeting them in person at various events, etc. these are the real wins. Communication is worthless unless you have someone to communicate with, and you know them. I don't expect a civilization-ending catastrophe to occur, and give it low odds that the commercial/consumer grid will ever go down in my area for more than a few hours. But despite these very long odds, some of us are ready anyway.

Practically speaking, I mainly use 2m for APRS/Packet and as a party-line for a few local nets each week. It's a time for the locals to get together and shoot the crap.
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Old 12-03-2017, 07:36 AM
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Originally Posted by JDH View Post
By your own admission you have no clue. When the SHTF is not the time to try to find one. Listening will still not give you a clue as to who will be able to hear you when the time comes you need to call for help.

Get your license, build a station, get on the air to find out how well it works, make changes as needed, rinse and repeat. Nobody says you have to dedicate all your free time to making it as a hobby. You do need to get on enough to figure out what frequencies at which times will get you where you want to be.
This ^^ +1

My favorite is the "I bought a baofeng but I wont get muh license cuz in a SHTF situation I wont need it...I puts it in a trashcan so when the EMP comes ill be able to talk to people..."

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Old 12-03-2017, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackrock View Post
The idea that you can purchase a radio now and figure out how to use it when you need it is unwise. What do you do if you have to move to another location for whatever reason and you don't know how to properly set up an antenna? What if you have to replace a coax connector and don't have the supplies/skill to do it? What if your antenna is destroyed and you have no idea how to build a home brew version?

As easy as it is to get a Technician HAM license I have no idea why anyone interested in self sufficiency/prepping wouldn't get one. It's not like it takes a college course to get one. Load the free app on your phone or computer, put in an hour or two of study every night for 2 weeks and go pass the test. IMO it's easier than the Drivers License exam.
Ive given up on even remotely convincing people to get licensed and get involved on some level if they have any concerns about comms post SHTF.

They either do or they dont.
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Old 12-03-2017, 09:54 AM
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Kodiak....I agree with you. Had a guy in a group that was like that. He finally left because we stayed on his ass about that. So instead of studying and getting his license he left. Oh well no loss. If you have a comms plan then you need to be licensed so that you can practice and learn at the same time. Don't just put it in a box and hope it works when you need it. You also need to know the limitations, and quirks about your equipment and make damn sure you know how use it when the "time" comes.
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Old 12-06-2017, 04:59 AM
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People are so used to the user friendliness of smart phones and modern computer software that the world of radio will be an unfortunate wake-up call to anyone who hasn't gotten into it at least somewhat. Just my .02
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:54 AM
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People are so used to the user friendliness of smart phones and modern computer software that the world of radio will be an unfortunate wake-up call to anyone who hasn't gotten into it at least somewhat. Just my .02
Nail on the head connection there! Especially those that buy a Baofeng and think they will be able to figure it out. I had over 20 years of being a software engineer and Amateur Extra when I purchased a uv5r and all I can say is wtf?

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Old 12-06-2017, 02:59 PM
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Nail on the head connection there! Especially those that buy a Baofeng and think they will be able to figure it out. I had over 20 years of being a software engineer and Amateur Extra when I purchased a uv5r and all I can say is wtf?

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Can you really say a yaesu is easier to program from the keypad. It's still pretty much the same steps


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Old 12-06-2017, 03:10 PM
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Can you really say a yaesu is easier to program from the keypad. It's still pretty much the same steps


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Seriously? I can enter a VFO Repeater frequency with tone and power setting, then call for a radio check in 10 seconds with FT60. Give me another 2 seconds and I can put that VFO content into a memory location. Even the most experienced user of a UV5R will still be working on the offset frequency while I'm saving off my VFO into memory.

I have both radios and the Baofeng is hands down the dog pile of the HT world. If for nothing else, ease of use. There are videos on Youtube which try to explain setting up a frequency in memory with a Baofeng. Go watch one and then you tell me. Oh and here is a kicker, set up a repeater frequency with PL on a Baofeng in VFO and then put it into memory! Get ready to repeat all previous steps.

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Old 12-06-2017, 09:15 PM
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Default Is 146.520 a Ham Radio thing?

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Originally Posted by FortunateSon View Post
Seriously? I can enter a VFO Repeater frequency with tone and power setting, then call for a radio check in 10 seconds with FT60. Give me another 2 seconds and I can put that VFO content into a memory location. Even the most experienced user of a UV5R will still be working on the offset frequency while I'm saving off my VFO into memory.

I have both radios and the Baofeng is hands down the dog pile of the HT world. If for nothing else, ease of use. There are videos on Youtube which try to explain setting up a frequency in memory with a Baofeng. Go watch one and then you tell me. Oh and here is a kicker, set up a repeater frequency with PL on a Baofeng in VFO and then put it into memory! Get ready to repeat all previous steps.
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Try comparing a ft270, or vx8, maybe FT2dr (a bit easier cuz it's all screen clicks) The baofeng isn't really that difficult.
On that note the ft60 is an easier one


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Old 12-17-2017, 08:59 AM
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I monitor it when I am in the shack. I just leave it on an old 2m rig. I often hear folks passing through and talk to them. In the truck, it is in my scan, so I can hear folks there as well. I rarely call out on 146.52, but have been known to do so if I needed info on an area or something.
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Old 05-12-2018, 03:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Lagnar View Post
Most people operating on 2m simply monitor their favorite repeater. I don't think I've ever monitored 146.520.

Once contact is made with somebody I want to talk to, we often switch over to an unused simplex frequency if we are within simplex range. Which is why it pays to have that 50 watts and big antenna handy. No sense tying up a popular repeater when you don't need to.
If there are multiple repeaters in an area, I run my ICOM 706 in scan mode and have the repeaters set for about a 100 mile radius.. I also have 146.52 set up in there as well.

I used that feature a lot more when I was in Fairbanks, AK because they had a repeater network that ran in one direction from Fairbanks, to the Canadian Border, and Fairbanks to Anchorage with several links between the destinations.

They also covered the Fairbanks area in an area of about several thousand square miles. The Caribou tend to stay on the 2 meter band, moose on 440, and bears used packet.. (Those crafty bears..)

Their big volunteer event each year was the Yukon Quest Sled Dog Race from Fairbanks to Whitehorse, Canada and the next year it would be from White Horse to Fairbanks.. A distance of over 1,000 miles. Not too shabby for a club in an area of less than 400,000 people..
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Old 05-13-2018, 12:10 PM
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If there are multiple repeaters in an area, I run my ICOM 706 in scan mode and have the repeaters set for about a 100 mile radius.. I also have 146.52 set up in there as well.
I used to be much more active on 2m when I lived elsewhere. All my friends are hams and we would experiment and do normal rag-chew stuff on simplex. I could easily talk from my house in the salt lake valley to my friend in cache valley over some 9000 ft. mountains and 80 miles away. Took a 13B2 to do it though.

I used to do the same thing with scanning repeaters. It got to the point that the most popular repeater in the Salt Lake area, 146.620, got so busy with people using it like channel 19 on CB, that I went elsewhere.

We are lucky in the fact that many of our repeaters are on the tops of mountains and have very wide coverage.

Putting the 13B2 back up is on my to-do list.



P.S. the antenna in the pic is shown horizontally polarized. Vertical for FM.
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Old 05-13-2018, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Lagnar View Post
I used to be much more active on 2m when I lived elsewhere. All my friends are hams and we would experiment and do normal rag-chew stuff on simplex. I could easily talk from my house in the salt lake valley to my friend in cache valley over some 9000 ft. mountains and 80 miles away. Took a 13B2 to do it though.

I used to do the same thing with scanning repeaters. It got to the point that the most popular repeater in the Salt Lake area, 146.620, got so busy with people using it like channel 19 on CB, that I went elsewhere.

We are lucky in the fact that many of our repeaters are on the tops of mountains and have very wide coverage.

Putting the 13B2 back up is on my to-do list.



P.S. the antenna in the pic is shown horizontally polarized. Vertical for FM.
My son and I dropped in on a ham (I don't remember his name or call sign), that lived in our town of Prescott Valley, AZ., who had dual rotatable 13 element vertically polarized 2 meter beams pointed towards Utah. He hooked up my Kenwood HT using only 13 milli-watts and was able to kerchunk a repeater in Utah. We were all amazed.

Edit: I'm betting that those antennas were Cushcraft 13B2s as you've pictured.

Prov 1:26 I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh;
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Old 05-17-2018, 10:19 AM
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This article is a bit dated, but contains lots of useful info for hams, and those perhaps interested in getting licensed:

Simplex Operations - Cross-Posted By Permission
© 2009 Arlington County , Virginia RACES

Realistic disaster training anticipates that some or all local repeaters may be unavailable. After a storm, repeater battery power must be conserved. Don’t hog a the repeater to rag chew with your buddy or always expect the repeater to “be there" to compensate for your poor station. Amateur radio emergency plans must stipulate when simplex is appropriate and provide guidance on frequency coordination, to manage operations without depending upon repeater infrastructure.

Repeaters are appropriate for event "talk-in" and to reach into areas with poor simplex coverage, but don't rely on them as your primary working frequency. If an event covers a few miles radius, use simplex instead of tying up the repeater. Keep repeaters available as backup into difficult to reach areas, alerting, or other purposes where wide-area coverage is needed.

When using the repeater, pause between transmissions, to enable stations with priority traffic to break in or assist in providing relays.

Instruct new operators where the “reverse” button is on their HT, so they can listen on the input frequency. If someone has a poor signal into the machine and you can copy on the input, you can relay. If making a contact and both stations have good copy on the input, change to simplex to free up the machine.

Nets which normally meet on a repeater when the repeater is “down” should be called on the repeater output frequency simplex, because that’s where people will be listening.

Establish and distribute a local communications plan. This informs operators which simplex frequencies to use for local nets and encourages operators to pre-program equipment to a standard list and to use their assigned simplex channels routinely. Simplex frequencies are not formally "coordinated," but should be arranged under "gentleman's agreement" by EmCom groups in your operational area.

New operator classes should include operating skills beyond the minimum needed to "pass the test." Teach the proper use of procedural words, ITU phonetics.

Stress Accuracy Brevity and Clarity in all modes of communications.

Teach messaging fundamentals using both ICS and NTS radiogram forms. Encourage new hams to participate in public service events, so they can practice, gain experience and confidence enabling them to become skilled, effective emergency communicators.

On simplex, it is important to open the squelch to listen for weak stations, instead of keeping it tight to reduce noise. Encourage use of simplex on weekly training nets as a reliability check of your emergency equipment, instead of using commercial power. New operators also need to be taught to use plain language, correct "pro words" and ITU phonetics on phone and how to program a new frequency, offset and CTCSS tone not already in memory.

Handheld transceivers are not adequate as primary rigs for emergency communications!
If an HT signal is so weak that it cannot be copied, it takes double the air time and battery consumption from others to provide relays, repeats or fills. Having "only an HT" limits you to nearby repeaters or simplex within a few miles.

Stress the use of minimum power needed for reliable communication, but remember that with simplex, the emphasis must be on RELIABLE! New operators of driving age should buy 50w mobiles as first rigs. Today they cost no more than a good HT, but they have MUCH better simplex performance. When you can afford a spare rig, THEN buy a sturdy dual-band HT! A portable is always useful to have as a backup, loaner and for use on solo foot assignments, such as storm damage assessment.

Guidance is necessary on appropriate battery power for working simplex versus local or distant repeaters. If a repeater goes off the air, your HT battery will run down more quickly, due to making higher-power transmissions. For EmCom your HT should be able to operate from its original rechargeable battery pack, a AA battery case, an auto cigarette lighter, or external gel cell battery.

If you have trouble getting through, improve your antenna system first.

Mobile/portable VHF operators for county-wide nets need a minimum of 25 watts output and a mast clamp to elevate a mobile 5/8 wave (3db) gain antenna 15 ft. or more above ground elevation. Handheld users in fringe areas need external battery power to maintain 5w into an elevated antenna with at least unity gain, such as a ˝ wave J-pole, or better a 3-4 element Yagi.

HT users may augment their HT with a 25-30w brick amplifier. Use enough transmitter output to get your traffic through the first time, but don't waste your batteries with inefficient use of excessive power which causes interference to distant stations you can’t hear! Home fixed stations should have an elevated antenna such as a discone in the attic, or an outdoor dual-band vertical at good height, and adequate battery power to last a minimum of 24 hours.

Don't depend on having a regular Net Control!

EmCom operators should all learn how to call up and run a net. In an emergency, your "regular" net control may be busy elsewhere! If the NCS of a scheduled weekly net misses his '"Sked", use the opportunity for a "wall flower drill." Somebody should just jump in there and do it. A suggested script is available at www.w4ava.org for groups that want to start their own local training net.

All directed nets follow a similar procedure. NCS comes up on the working frequency and asks if it is in use. If the frequency is clear, call the net. Then state its purpose and that it is directed. Ask if there is any emergency or priority traffic. If there is, then deal with it now! Call for liaisons from other nets, stations with traffic or any who need relays.

Emergency nets don't take check ins to build a roster, but to match up needs with assets. NCS asks who has traffic or information, determines which stations can handle the traffic or task, assigns stations to handle it, deals with it as it comes and moves on. If the net is not busy, traffic may be passed on the net right immediately. When traffic is heavy, NCS should direct stations off frequency to pass their traffic while the net proceeds. Stations sent off-frequency should check back into the net when finished. Moving an entire net in unison to an alternate frequency should be done only as a last resort, because some stations WILL get lost in the shuffle.

A "weak signal" (all-mode) rig is recommended for the primary NCS because its improved sensitivity brings in fringe stations those typical FM mobiles can't even hear. All-mode transceivers which don't receive outside the 2-meter band are less susceptible to intermodulation distortion. EmCom must be able to operate in high RF environments in close proximity to emergency services, hospital paging and other users. CTCSS reduces interference, but when the squelch is open RF mixing products can still get in.

In our experience Par Electronics notch filters http://www.parelectronics.com/amateur.htm work better for IMD suppression in typical EmCom applications than the DCI helical cavity band pass. These are compatible with dual-band rigs, with low VSWR, transparent UHF pass-through, and are effective when a strong near-field source desenses typical mobile transceivers.

In tests conducted at the Washington, DC area 2-meter simplex contacts were reliable to 15 miles away, impossible with the DCI “can” used in the same high-RF environment. Low-loss UHF pass-through enabled UHF simplex contact between hospitals within a ten-mile radius of the "Command hospital" during the Dulles Disaster 2000 Exercise.
Dual-band rigs are desirable, because UHF is more effective than VHF in built-up urban areas. Use dual-band mobiles in cross-band repeat with CTCSS as access control to conduct nets from within shelters or hospitals and to reach into low areas with poor simplex coverage.

The 220 MHz band is quiet, less affected by intermod than 2 meters. It gets out of buildings well and has good simplex propagation. If you have enough operators with 220 capability, you include it in your operating plans.

The importance of increasing antenna height cannot be stressed highly enough. A 4-element Yagi elevated 15 ft. with 25w from an HT+brick amp out performs 100 watts into a typical mobile whip mounted on the car trunk lid. If you don't use a portable mast, at least drive to a high spot away from power lines to operate. Using a portable mast mounted base antenna or Yagi enables you to use less power to save your batteries. Some of our operators use a ground radial adapter, which enables a mobile antenna to be attached with hose clamps and elevated on a portable mast. The rest use a small dual-band base antenna with at least 3db gain.

Antenna Recommendations: Cushcraft's AR-270 dual-bander is only 3.75 feet high, 5/8 wave on 2m and collinear on 440. The Diamond X-50N is another compact dual-band antenna which fits into an SUV. Their performance and VSWR are also acceptable for low power 220. Both are ideal either for portable use or attic installation where outside antennas may be restricted.

Most mobile VHF operators use 5/8 wave 2-meter whips. These will also work as a 1/4 wave whips on 6 meters if you feed both rigs through a diplexer. If you use a dual-band radio the Larsen NMO-2/70 is hard to beat. Serious 2-meter mobile simplex operators like the Diamond SG7900, Hustler CG144 or the Lakeview 2m hamstick.

Bicycle / motorcycle/ marine mobiles, fiberglass van or ambulance bodies without a ground plane require half-wave antennas (Diamond SG7200 or Comet CX-224) which provide unity gain without a vehicle ground. The Radio Shack window-clip mount enables attaching a BNC whip to your HT while having a clear RF path outside the vehicle.

For simplex operation from fringe areas, small Yagis such as Cushcraft's A148-3S or 124WB are compact, have good gain and a wide useable pattern. Short Yagi antennas of about 1/2 wavelength with up to five elements can be used in fixed position without the frequent re-aiming required of long "boomers." Color-code elements, use wing nuts to ease reassembly and store the antenna in capped PVC pipe.

It is basic to emergency operation that stations have sufficient batteries or other auxiliary power to operate for at least 24 hours.

One amp-hour of battery capacity per watt of transmitter output is the minimum recommended. "Barefoot" HT operators need at least a pair of 12-volt, 2ah gel cell batteries, extra NiCd pack, AA battery case, plus a gain antenna such as a telescoping half-wave, "tiger tail" counterpoise, a mobile mag mount or wind-up J-pole.

Powering a mobile rig from the car battery works OK for only a few hours. It is wasteful of scarce gasoline in a real emergency to run the engine for 10 minutes out of every hour to keep the battery charged, when there may not be electricity to run the pumps!

A better technical solution is to equip a vehicle with dual batteries and an isolator obtained from a boating or RV supplier so that both batteries are charged by the vehicle alternator, but isolated when discharging. If the vehicle is not driven regularly, connect solar panels equal to 1-1/2 to 2% of the battery capacity to maintain the battery banks against self-discharge when the vehicle is idle. If the solar panels don't exceed 2% of battery capacity, they are self-regulating and no charge controller is then needed.

A lower-cost option is to carry a boxed deep cycle battery and automatic, low amperage AC charger such as a Schumacher Electric Mod. SE-1-12S (Wal-Mart, $39).

Despite their popularity, gel cells are not "the answer" because they are not deep cycle and depth of discharge over 25% significantly reduces their life! They are unusable below -20oC, in the engine compartments of vehicles or other uses subject to temperatures above 50 degs. C. Gel cells must never be charged at over 14 volts or with unregulated current exceeding 1/10 of their capacity. Gel cells larger than 10 amp/hours can be left continually on an automatic, low amperage charger without harm, but should not be allowed to "float" endlessly without shut-off.

For portable operations requiring movement in support of SAR or wildfire suppression, a 15-18ah gel battery such as those used in fire alarm panels and emergency lighting fit in a brief- case or backpack and power a 5w HT, laptop, GPS and TNC all day. Better for extended "portable ops" is a Group U1 33ah AGM battery, used in wheel chairs. These weigh 25 pounds, fit in a military .50 cal. steel ammunition and run a 25w mobile or laptop, TNC and separate voice and data HTs all day. Two U1's power a dual-band mobile on 10w cross-band repeat for 48 hours. For continuous operation alternate between two batteries, recharging in 8-hour rotations. If unable to recharge, the primary net control needs a BCI Group 27 (95 ah) battery to go around the clock at 25w with a decent antenna.

Flooded batteries are cheap and plentiful...

However, they must be boxed, stored upright and lose half of their capacity below freezing. Better, for severe service, high vibration, extreme temperature environments are valve regulated AGM batteries used in military or public safety vehicles and by the US Coast Guard. A Group 27 Concorde Lifeline (65 lbs., $199) has aircraft-type cell construction and is UPS shippable from West Marine, (1-800-BOATING). It can power a 100w HF rig through Field Day! day. Lifeline batteries come in the small U1 size as well as the popular Group 24, 27 and 30 marine sizes.

The usual failure mode of dry NiCds in hand held transceivers is not "memory" effect, but either deep discharge causing cell reversal or diminished capacity caused by excessive charge current or prolonged slow over charging. Safely charge dry NiCds using rated voltage + 15% to overcome internal resistance, at current equaling 10% of the battery capacity, times ten hours.

Prepare a "Go Kit" with Essential Equipment.

Carry basic emergency equipment in your car to include essential tools; first aid kit; some emergency cash (enough for a tank of gas, hot meal, and a room); coax and antenna; battery, power cords and wall charger; a ABC fire extinguisher; three days supply of nonperishable food and drinking water; sanitation supplies (baby wipes highly recommended!) medications; rain gear, sturdy shoes and a change of warm clothing.

We do not recommend for EmCom the use of mag mounts constructed using RG-58 coax having a solid center conductor. This cable is suitable only for permanent vehicle installations where it will not be subjected to repeated flexing.

Factory installed crimp-UHF connectors on mag mounts should be reinforced behind the reducer with heat shrink or tape. Frequent flexing eventually causes failure of the shield at the connector, at the worst possible time.

Best simplex performance results from using an efficient antenna, elevated as high as you safely can above surrounding ground elevation, using the shortest run of low loss feed line, providing the highest effective radiated power for the least battery consumption.

Use RG8-X only for HF runs less than 100 ft, jumpers and short VHF runs to 30 feet and for mobile installs. Use RG-8 or RG-213 for HF or 6 meters for runs up to 200 ft. or 2 meters up to 50 ft. Use LMR400 for VHF runs over 50 feet and all uses above 200 MHz.
By training to operate effectively on simplex, EmCom is more flexible and able to maintain emergency communications independent of repeater infrastructure.

Visit our web site: http://www.w4ava.org for more info.
Attached Files
File Type: doc Battery101.doc (53.0 KB, 15 views)
File Type: doc Recommendations for Preparedness1Dec09.doc (96.0 KB, 17 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_1_LocalCkList.doc (42.5 KB, 17 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_2_EMAC_CkList.doc (40.5 KB, 17 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_3_PersGear12Hrs.doc (41.5 KB, 16 views)
File Type: pdf Appendix_5_Building Your 24-hour Pack and 72-hour Annex.pdf (1.17 MB, 17 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_6_Pre-DeploymentChecklist.doc (54.5 KB, 38 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_7_NetScript_Rptr.doc (32.0 KB, 15 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_8_NetScriptSimplexTest.doc (41.5 KB, 14 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_9_ScriptFreqOrRptrUse.doc (30.0 KB, 15 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_10_PROWORDS.doc (43.5 KB, 15 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_13_EOC_MsgFlowChart.doc (33.0 KB, 15 views)
File Type: doc Appendix_18_OperatorBriefing.doc (31.5 KB, 18 views)
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Old 05-19-2018, 06:47 PM
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as a portable station I think the capacity of 40-50 foot mast is going to be a requirement 6-8 feetmoff the deck distance is going to be short whether you transmit over VHF, UHF OR HF your distance in transmission is going to be limiting at the best of times..

as for batteries, I NiCads aren't worth the money you pay for them..

you are likely going to be investing in the Lifepo4 batteries.. in the 24-48 volt dc size..

antenna cable you would likely invest in the cheapest cable that is quad shielded on the market..

you may use anywhere from rg-58, rg-6 up to rg-213 you will likely use anything you can lay your hands on at the cheap and readily available


And you will have a bare minimum of 4-7 radios on the trot within use monitoring traffic..

from 21-50 MHz, from 108-478 MHz, 700MHz-10GHz covering you from cb/gmrs/uhf cb/ham radio and everything in between..

With radio use I would consider a crank battery and 4 aux battery setup..

For mobile use you are looking at 7-12 foot masts.. as whatever you use must have the capacity of 360 degrees and be high enough to clear your towing needs..
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