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Old 08-12-2017, 10:40 PM
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Default What should be in a survival fishing kit?



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So fishing was to be my project for next summer, but needless to say I am pushing up that timeline a bit.... its the only area I am currently lacking for my sthf plans. However, I am a complete novice when it comes to fishing, although not afraid to dig in and learn up how to fish and use the equipment. I know "kits" in general tend to be poorly thought out, poor quality, and often full of useless filler to make it look better, but I am not sure where to start either for what I need. I imagine some might be better than others, so not adverse to buying a kit if there is a great one, but it is a bit overwhelming when looking at them on Cabelas or Amazon. None of my family or friends are avid about fishing, so I don't have anyone to help get me started.

Can someone suggest a good resource or thread that lists for what I should get for fishing gear? I tried searching on the forum but couldn't seem to find anything aimed at beginners like me I also ran into a dead end trying to find any books for this region aimed at beginners. This is for ocean, lake and river fishing in the Pacific NW, which probably means I need a variety of fishing gear.
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Old 08-12-2017, 11:11 PM
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If you search the archives, I know that this has been discussed to death before.

But the simple answer is to buy the same survival fishing kit which is packed in military aircrew survival kits:

http://www.bestglide.com/survival_fishing_kit.html

Standard Emergency Survival Fishing Kit
Best Glide ASE

Contents:

Manual, Fishing Tips and Instructions
Sticker (2) Survival Tin Sticker
Jig (1) 2" Swirl Tail Grub
Jig (1) Tiny Shad
Jig (1) 1 1/2" Tube Jig
Spoon (1) 1/4 oz.
Bait (8) Salmon Eggs
Fly (1) Size 8
Fly (1) Size 10 1/8
Desiccant (1) Moisture Absorbing Packet
Razor (1) Folding Razor Knife
Hooks (2) Treble
Hooks (3) #4
Hooks (3) #6
Hooks (3) #8
Leaders (4) Wire Wound Leaders
Split Shot (4) BB
Split Shot (4) 3/0
Bobber (1) ¾”
Line (50 Ft) 12LB
Line (25 Ft) 30LB
Ready Line (Line, Bobber, Sinker, Hook)

Assembled in the USA
Exceeds Alaska and Canada over flight requirements
Mil Spec Razor Knife
Pre-made fishing line
Designed by avid fishermen
Fishing tips and tricks
Water resistant packaging
Silica Gel Desiccant
Quality components
Name brand manufacturers
More of most used items
Used and sold around the world

Also recommend military speed-hook 2-pack NSN 4220-01-379-5598
http://www.bestglide.com/Military_Speedhook_Info.html
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:35 AM
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Like any list for a kit,it will get longer as people chime in,so I'll mention 3 items,and why.
1)lots and lots of braided line
2)lots and lots of assorted hooks
3)some type of net..cast,seine..gill..purse

Since you mention for shtf/survival..the most efficent way to fish is using bait on a set line,then coming back later to check.
Hooks and line will be the hardest thing to improvise,and are fairly cheap..so stock up now...nets cost more,but are extremely effective!

This is not "fishing for fun".
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Old 08-13-2017, 08:44 AM
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If you are looking for a kit for if SHTF while fishing, start with the basics, first aid, shelter, fire, water, food, rescue. Different waters will need different items. Fresh water fishing will need a water filter, treatment tablets, and/or something to boil water with while salt water will need a way to distill water and catch rainwater. Caught on open water means you will need different kinds of flares, lights, and smoke (no blue or gray smoke) while on land you can use signal fires also (no green smoke signals). It is good to have some ready to use water and food with you to add some time to do other things before you have to provide your own.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:46 AM
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It would help to know what type of water you will be fishing in. Saltwater and tidal? Fresh water lakes and ponds or flowing rivers.

If size and weight isn't a problem don't skimp on anything. Plenty of various size lines; plenty of various size hooks, small hooks catch big fish large hooks catch larger fish. Go with small over large hooks but have both; jigs of various sizes; plastic jig trailers and plastic worms; split shot and sinkers; bobbers; a net will help you land fish that you may lose if hand landing.

BTW: plastic trailers and worms can be melted to repair rips and tears. If you can make a mold you can melt the damaged plastic lures and pour it into a mold and remake new worms or trailers.

A fishing rod and reel will give you a major advantage over set or hand held lines.

You maybe surprised how much fishing equipment can be put into small containers.
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Old 08-13-2017, 11:08 AM
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Practice..... And go to your local sporting goods store, those that work in the fishing section are usually a wealth of info for the local areas.

Most of the product on shop shelves are designed more to catch the angler and not the local aquatics..... Practice

Get a yoyo they let you multitask.....Practice

Learn how to rig a trot line, and a small bait net....

And if you are still not practicing now, hunger does not improve your learning curve when it matters. Its your local waters where you will be spending your time you need to know them, spawning cycles, water temp ranges based on weather and runoff play a large roll in what the fish are doing.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:06 PM
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Default The Pin is Bent, Getting Started Fishing

Folks here often ask about getting started fishing. Here is one man's opinion:

Fishing gear and techniques can vary a great deal depending on the climate and water conditions at your location and the fish species they can support. I recommend your first step should be to find out what fish types live near you and what techniques to try. By all means ask at your local sporting goods store. But don't be shocked if all the gear they recommend is expensive.

Speaking of cost, you can outfit yourself for less than $100 at your local Wal Mart if you want. I fished for over 30 yrs, with great success, with only the most basic gear (mostly a medium Ugly Stick spin rod and Mitchell 306). Fancy and expensive rods are nice, but not really necessary.

Here are a few types of fishing that work under nearly all conditions.

Spin Fishing Gear: I believe that spin fishing is the most versatile method. This gear will allow you to fish with most weighted spinners, plugs, jigs, plastic worms, and most bait rigs. You can land even very large fish out of clear (non obstructed) water. My initial recommendation is to buy a multi piece, medium stiftness 6 - 7 ft spinning rod suited for 1/4 - 3/4 oz lures and a quality spinning reel made by Shimano, Mitchell, Okuma, or Diawa. Size the reel to the rod and spool it with at least 200 yds of 8 lb line. The original Shakespeare Ugly Stick or the newer Ugly Stick Lite are low cost and very durable rods. Cabela’s and Bass Pro also sell decent 3 and 4 piece pack rods for spin fishing.

Bait Casting Gear: Fishing for larger fish in waters obstructed with trees, rocks, and heavy weeds calls for tougher gear. In most of the Southern US, this is the home of Large Mouth Bass and Catfish. Some beginner fishermen become frustrated by this gear, since a baitcasting reel can quickly backlash if you do not have decades of experience controlling the spool with your thumb. I do have decades of experience and it still happens to me at times. If you decide to add baitcasting gear to your spinning outfit, you will find that a decent bait casting reel is not nearly as inexpensive as decent spin reels. I recommend a 6 – 7 ft bait casting rod suited for 3/8 – 1 ½ oz lures and an Abu Garcia reel sized for at least 100 yds of 14 lb line.

Fly Fishing Gear: If you live in the western US where trout and salmon are the dominate species, you are likely to find out that using only spin fishing and bait casting gear leaves you at a disadvantage. In the high altitude lakes and steams of the western mountains, these fish survive almost exclusively on insects and insect larvae. The truth is you can eat like a king with a fly rod in the mountains, but you will really struggle without one. I purchased a 7.5 ft 5 pc pack rod suited for #6 line 25 yrs ago and have used it ever since.

Gill Nets and Traps: Gill nets and traps are easy to purchase, not real hard to make, but they can be very difficult to learn to set effectively. If legal in your area, by all means buy them and try it out. A gill net set between two small islands or across the mouth of a creek may produce all the fish you could ever need. A well built turtle trap can be so effective, that you could actually fish out all the turtles in a small lake. So be careful with these things.

Set Lines, Trot Lines, and Yo-yos: Many folks here would rate the invention of the modern trot line as important as fire, cereal grain agriculture, or animal husbandry. I have to point out that they are only effective against a few fish species (fortunately common and prolific species) and under certain conditions. Bank lines, limb lines, and Yo-yos are similarly effective under some conditions, but they are far more limited in placement. These techniques require a lot of bait and a lot of experience to set. So again, check if they are legal in your area, and practice with these things before your base your survival plans on a trot line.

Packing Fishing Gear and Tackle: For most people and in most areas, I recommend both a medium spinning out fit and a medium heavy bait casting outfit, plus a trot line, and a gill net. I recommend a small tackle box with a couple dozen spinners, plugs, lots of plastic worms, a jar of salmon eggs, and several hundred assorted bait hooks. The total wt of my fishing rods, reels, and tackle is about 6 lbs.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:35 PM
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Believe it or not...
the Snoopy or Barbie fishing kits for kids work fine.
If you're fishing off a dock or something like that,
not going after halibut or sharks, the little kits work well.
Cheap too.
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Old 08-13-2017, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uteguy View Post
Believe it or not...
the Snoopy or Barbie fishing kits for kids work fine.
If you're fishing off a dock or something like that,
not going after halibut or sharks, the little kits work well.
Cheap too.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Xx_vpmA68DE
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:50 PM
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I have many many years of fishing experience so Ill share with you what I would recommend.

If you want a traditional pole for fishing I would recommend something between 6 and 7 foot. A spinning reel size 3000 or 4000. (A Shakespeare Ugly Stick is a good place to start.)

If you want something minimal they have telescoping cane poles such as the B'n'M Black Widow.

I use 15 or 20 pound line. I prefer braid but monofilament line works in a pinch.

A few different size circle hooks. I use circle hooks because they set themselves. All you have to do is start reeling and the hook does the hard part for you.

A few split shot, of different sizes. Maybe a bobber or two.

As far as tackle a spoon is hard to beat. Plastic worms, a few jigs.

If you plan on fishing freshwater only I would have some way of keeping and storing night crawlers.

If you fish saltwater then I would use a cast net to catch bait and use that for the bigger fish. Or you can catch sand fleas right out of the surf. Pretty much any fish swimming within casting distance in the ocean will devour a sand flea.

There are a few good knots to use when tying fishing line to reels and to hooks and stuff. (Arbor knot, improved clinch, uni to uni) I would recommend memorizing a few of those. There are also a few rigs you could learn that would help in saltwater. The double dropper rig works like a charm. They are for sale but with a search on youtube there are some videos that teach you how to tie the rigs with nothing more than the fishing line. (With something like 60 or 80 pound monofilament) No swivels, barrels, beads, floats and all of that extra fancy stuff.

Also if you plan to fish saltwater I would recommend learning about some of the fish species you can come in contact with. There are some that are toxic and can make you sick if eaten.

And lastly, a good sharp knife. It is nearly impossible to cut/fillet a fish unless you have a razor sharp knife.
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Old 08-13-2017, 08:29 PM
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My suggestion (it is a rather old list so not all links might work, but should give you some ideas):

Minimum fishing kits

What I consider a good small fishing kit that I’m putting together. The kite string winders will work when you can’t find a pole to cut and are quick and easy, anyway. The gill nets are probably the best fish getter, but aren’t legal in most places now, and when the weather is severe and the water cold, it can get chilly using one. Ditto the cast net and trot line.

2x Kite string winder http://www.winddancekites.com/store/...t_detail&p=778 / http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/gal/gal815.htm
Survival fishing kit http://www.bestglide.com/survival_fishing_kit.html
Eagle Claw Fishing kit http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104390280
2x 50# test braided line http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104612580
2x 100# test braided line http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104612580
1x Set of spinners http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104596380
2x Gill net http://www.bestglide.com/deluxe_gill_net.html
1x Cast net http://www.castnetworld.com/excaliburcastnets.html
1x Trotline kit http://www.barlowstackle.com/Trotlin...Off-P1759.aspx
1x Gerber Fisherman’s multi-tool http://www.cabelas.com/product/Fishi...3Bcat104505480

If you want to add a rod & reel:
Abu Garcia/Cardinal spinning rod and reel: http://www.abugarcia.com/products/co...-bruiser-combo


For subsistence fishing the nets, limb lines, and trot lines will be the best bet. Bank, and even some boat fishing by rod/reel or pole lines tends to be very time consuming for the amount of fish harvested, unless a run is on.

Consider bow fishing. Or the Pocket Shot, especially the Hammer Pocket Shot with arrow kit:
http://www.thepocketshot.com/store/c..._Products.html

And check the various Survival Manuals such as the SAS Manual, US army survival manuals, and others. All have various types of fish traps and snares that can be made in the field.

Just my opinion.
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Old 12-01-2017, 01:32 PM
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ShaneXD9 hit the nail on the head with the telescoping cane pole. B&M makes probably one of the best. One suggestion though, drill a small hole a couple of inches about the reel itself (Located on the bottom of the pole) and feed your line through that hole up to the end of the pole. That will keep 8 feet of line from snagging on everything while you're walking down to your fishing hole. Those telescoping poles are awesome for using on Crappie in lakes back east (Reelfoot, TN) comes to mind. I've seen guys in jon boats filling 48qt coolers with pan sized crappie and the occasional bass or three in no time at all. Using small plastic jigs and hooks. All that will fit easily in a medium sized pill bottle for carrying in your BOB.

As for the best lures, hooks, weights, do some hunting at local yard sales. Usually Pops has passed on and the siblings don't know squat about all that fishing stuff and you can usually buy a full tackle box of goodies that Pop used locally. If it looks like cheap junk, walk away from it or pick through it to find things that look like they'll work. Fake minnows, spoons, lots of hooks and weights, that kind of thing. Don't forget bobbers either.

+1 for talking to your local fishing shop. They don't make money selling stuff that doesn't work and they want you back more than once so they're going to give you the right stuff.

Nobody had mentioned boats yet. Canoes work but, to me, the best thing to use is a Jon boat with a decent electric trolling motor. Bass Trackers with 150hp outboards are definitely overkill/ My Jon boat will ride on the top of my canopy on my pickup with a small gas motor, gas tank, screw on seat, trolling motor, deep cycle battery, and even a fish finder if I need to add one. Everything but the boat rides inside the truck and that still leaves me room for a bed in the back along with stove, 5 gallon water jug, 12v/110v fridge, and any other necessary items I might want to bring along.
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Old 12-02-2017, 07:16 PM
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The basic idea of catching fish for protein in a SHTF deal is far different that fun fishing.

To start with I would suggest seeking a fishing buddy that has greasy lips. In other words they catch the fish to eat not for fun. The skills an ways they use will better prepare you for survival fishing.

My kit is built to cover the walking away type fishing. Bank lines , jugging or trot lines can be set an checked when the time is best for safe movement. I keep 5 different lines in my kit. 1) a heavy nylon 250ish pound test 80 to 100ft. It can be used as bank lines, jugs for big fish, turtles and trot line building. 2) A braided line in say 12 to 15 pound test the whole roll. It can be used to fish or sew. 3) heavy mono 17 to 25 lb test 100 yrd or so roll. 4) a lite mono 6/8lb test 100yd or so roll. 5) braided nylon casting line a whole roll.

Hooks buy good ones! Hooks make a difference fishing. Sharp strong hooks catch more fish. I like long shank hooks for panfishing an small octopus hooks for trout fishing. The old stand buy heavy straight shank hooks in 4 or so sizes all the way up to 4/0. A few packs of long shank hooks of 4,6&8. A selection of treble hooks 4 or 5 of each size from 3/0 to 10. These put meat on the table.

Lead weight, just a small assortment of different sizes from very small to a few 3/8 oz slip sinkers.

A few very small floats. A feathers calamus makes great panfishing floats as well as dry stems or reeds.

I do like jig heads and crappie jigs for catching all panfish I am use to catching. I do not believe is carrying any other artificial bait. In survival fishing a cut pole will be easy to acquire. I will work well with jigs but not so well with other artificial baits.

Fishing is much like shooting. You can have the tools and know what to do but applying it is all together different. Again go fish some with someone that eats fish an not a sport fisherman.

Also learn to make baskets. Fish baskets produce a pile of fish in a few hrs or overnight when set in the correct spot.

SMALL fish are easier to catch an in volume. Do not get hung up on needing to catch a 5 lb fish to live off of. A dozen of so panfish can be caught quickly when you know what you are doing.
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Old 12-07-2017, 11:40 AM
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A spool of 30 pound test braided line, A few yards of 10 pound fluorocarbon line for leaders if needed, a small pack of assorted size hooks (big hooks catch big fish, small hooks catch all fish) a few split shot, a few asst panfish jigs and a few asst small flashy metal spoons for jigging, a few asst panfish grubs. Done. Keep in mind if you are not packing a fishing rod, you can't rally use a cast and retrieve lure like a spinner or large spoon. Most fishing will be done vertically (jigging) or at a short distance on the end of a sapling you have cut. Keep it simple and use natural or live bait whenever possible. Ice fishing will call for the jigs, small spoons, and soft plastic grubs.
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Old 12-07-2017, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SurvivalistChick View Post
So fishing was to be my project for next summer, but needless to say I am pushing up that timeline a bit.... its the only area I am currently lacking for my sthf plans. However, I am a complete novice when it comes to fishing, although not afraid to dig in and learn up how to fish and use the equipment. I know "kits" in general tend to be poorly thought out, poor quality, and often full of useless filler to make it look better, but I am not sure where to start either for what I need. I imagine some might be better than others, so not adverse to buying a kit if there is a great one, but it is a bit overwhelming when looking at them on Cabelas or Amazon. None of my family or friends are avid about fishing, so I don't have anyone to help get me started.

Can someone suggest a good resource or thread that lists for what I should get for fishing gear? I tried searching on the forum but couldn't seem to find anything aimed at beginners like me I also ran into a dead end trying to find any books for this region aimed at beginners. This is for ocean, lake and river fishing in the Pacific NW, which probably means I need a variety of fishing gear.
Oooh PNW, I cant really help you too much there, I was stationed up there a couple of years but wasnt able to do much in the way of fishing. One thing is for sure...they got more regs than you can shake a stick at when it comes to fishing there, bag limits and they vary depending on which stretch of water you might be on.

Most of the fishing I did was for Salmon (Fly Rod and Trolling) a little crabbing and some halubit fishing. A lot of that was done from an Ocean Kayak Prowler 13 with a depth sounder/GPS. Surely there are others here that can give you far more insight than I ever could on this subject as I am a southern boy kinda fisherman. Its too cold much further than Texas for me!!! Your right though most of the kits sold in stores leave a lot to be desired. Your much better off "building your own" for sure! Do get a copy of the current regs in your area you will be fishing and get very well versed in them...the game wardens do brisk business up there. Do spend as much time as you can to master the skill before you need it as like Gardening, there is a lot more too it than initially meets the eye if you want to be consistently good at it. Do rub shoulders with older fishermen out there as most will be more than willing to give you tips and pointers, those are the guys I got most of the knowledge I have accumulated over the last 4 decades. They have been there, done that and can put you on the fast track and shorten the learning curve considerably, saving you a lot of time. effort not to mention money too!
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Old 12-07-2017, 01:54 PM
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The first thing you need is a basic understanding of basic fish biology and behavior for the species in your area.
second know your knots
I fly fish mostly but also have a spinner reel for emergencies.

that said,
have some strong line
box of hooks I took an old rapella lure box small one very small and put about 100 hooks in it.
maybe a lure or two

and a rod that is strong enough for whatever area you are in, a 4 weight trout rod will die salmon fishing
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Old 12-07-2017, 02:22 PM
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add a handfull of tied flies and some fly leaders.
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Old 02-02-2018, 02:44 PM
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I would argue that for survival purposes you should be thinking in terms of harvesting fish, not fishing as an activity. Things like trot lines, speedhooks, yo-yo reels and gill nets should get you more fish with less of a time and energy investment.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=AT9124L5XKU5J

https://www.amazon.com/Mechanical-Fi...AE6549TAQPM8G5

https://www.amazon.com/Best-Glide-AS...70_&dpSrc=srch

Of course, these will take up more space, so they tend more suitable for a fixed location.
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Old 02-02-2018, 03:22 PM
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We just use a "Dip Net". We have millions of Salmon choking the streams. We just dip them out. On the lakes we use gillnets. Even when the lakes are frozen.

Use the fish guts and heads for trapline and bear bait. Hard to starve in Alaska.
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Old 02-02-2018, 04:59 PM
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I use a thin willow branch, some 8lb test, a yellow jig and frozen minnows to ice fish.
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