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2017 Michigan Seed Swaps & Seed Libraries PondEdge Michigan 2 02-15-2017 01:36 PM

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Old 09-30-2018, 06:28 AM
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Now that I think of it, it might have been "cane skimmin's" that old Linn was talking about. Skimmings come off the top of the juice as it's boiled down to make syrup and was set aside in a bucket. Natural fermentation, I guess!

After trying several search phrases, "make rhum from sorghum" seemed to work best. For starters from that search, a few interesting articles (more there):

From Cane Juice To Alcohol: Fermentation
http://www.rhum-agricole.net/site/en/fab_fermentation

Sorghum Meets Whiskey: A Southern Love Story
http://www.thirstysouth.com/2015/09/25/sorghum-whiskey/

Sorghum makes for mighty fine rum
https://www.nuvo.net/food_and_drink/...554225ea8.html

Sorghum Rum
https://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=10439
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Old 10-06-2018, 07:50 PM
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We had a frost a few nights ago, so, it's time to bring the squash into the house/barn.





Potatoes are about to be dug... winter is coming!

inMichigan
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Old 10-07-2018, 06:57 AM
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Absolutely beautiful. I sure wish I could grow such nice winter squash here. Just too many bugs and heat. Your root cellar will be stocked indeed. Can't wait to see all the potatoes you'll be digging.
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Old 11-10-2018, 09:48 AM
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Highlights of November:

Used the pull behind potato digger to lift the main 'fill the root cellar plot':

4 long rows. We are particularly pleased with the size and quality of the Pinto Potatoes planted from seed potatoes saved from last year.


Trimmed and sorted the Stuttgarter Onions for storage:

The goal for 2019 is to grow some of these for seed and start the self sufficiency cycle.

Enjoyed some Floriani Red Flint Corn pancakes with Rox Orange sorghum syrup:


Rox Orange is a sorghum variety developed for those of us in northern gardens.

The Tennessee Red Valencia peanuts are hung in the barn. Here are a few of the extra choice plants:

These are from several seasons of direct seeding here in Michigan. Selection seems to be improving the line.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:25 AM
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Did a deep empty of the chest freezer to make space for some fresh poultry. From the odds and ends, ran 14 quarts of beef and potatoe soup thru the All American last night.

Found about a dozen ducks hidden down deep. Gave their whole bodies 20 minutes at 10 psi to make them fall apart. Picked the meat out,bones went out for the chickens to enjoy, and repacked in tall thin pint jars and packed that in the duck broth...they are on the stove now. Tonight, a dozen chickens left from 2017.

InMichigan
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Old 11-12-2018, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by inMichigan View Post
Did a deep empty of the chest freezer to make space for some fresh poultry. From the odds and ends, ran 14 quarts of beef and potatoe soup thru the All American last night.

Found about a dozen ducks hidden down deep. Gave their whole bodies 20 minutes at 10 psi to make them fall apart. Picked the meat out,bones went out for the chickens to enjoy, and repacked in tall thin pint jars and packed that in the duck broth...they are on the stove now. Tonight, a dozen chickens left from 2017.

InMichigan
Great day! That's a lot of stuff but just think of all the tasty and quick, "heat & eat", "dump & dine", time saving meals you have now.
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:14 PM
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Buckwheat, both Tartary and Japanese, have a tough little hull. Removing those hulls at the homestead scale of equipment is not well documented or known to me. However, if you want 'flour' for making pancakes, I tested an easy method.

It's more common to eat Japanese or common Buckwheat, but I happen to have more of the Tartary Buckwheat. Tartary buckwheat is similar to common buckwheat (F. esculentum) but is more frost tolerant. Its seeds are slightly smaller and contain more of the anti-inflammatory compound rutin. The plants, flowers and seed shape are amazingly the same for two things from different genius/species.


After drying, threshing and winnowing to clean the grain, using our Tartary Buckwheat, I used seed sorting/cleaning screens. I wanted to sort out the tiny, poorly filled grains. I also wanted to grab any specially large seeds to save for planting.



This is what I removed:


We have a flaking mill (or called a rolling mill) like you would use to make oatmeal (or chicken feed). I set the roller gap as wide as possible, while still 'crunching' the hulls a little bit. I want to try and break them, not mash them to get this:


I made several passes thru the flaking mill, setting it tighter each time to eventually get this:


Which using screens can be split into the "empty hulls":

which can be used to make featherless pillows.

And buckwheat flour:

which can be used to make pancakes!

It took me two years to getting around to try this because I had no idea it would be so easy. I've been told you can use your flour mill to do the same thing, but, my idea was to use the flaker to try and avoid breaking up the hull into high-fiber bits in case it's not tasty.

I use this recipe:
Floriani Flint Corn or Buckwheat Buttermilk Pancakes:
1 egg
1 cup of buttermilk
2 Tbs melted butter (or oil)
2/3 cup of finely ground cornmeal or buckwheat flour
1/3 cup of regular flour
1 Tbs sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt

Prepare the batter by beating the egg and then adding the ingredients in the listed order. I like to cook them in a hot skillet with a bit of cooking oil by spooning in the batter. Flip them when they've puffed up and are bubbly.

inMichigan
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Old 01-13-2019, 06:14 AM
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Good morning! Glad to see your still hanging in there. Always enjoy reading your posts. I usually dont have anything to add, cause you clearly know what the hell your doing. And I dont..
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Old 01-14-2019, 05:04 PM
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Good morning! Glad to see your still hanging in there. Always enjoy reading your posts. I usually dont have anything to add, cause you clearly know what the hell your doing. And I dont..
Spread very thin this past year...

No such things a dumb question to help make things more clear... for the dozen too shy to ask!

inMichigan
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Old 01-22-2019, 05:33 PM
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Had to drive 90 minutes each way to bring home my new tool:

but it was worth it.
inMichigan
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Old 01-22-2019, 05:42 PM
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You sure run across some neat stuff!
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Old 01-22-2019, 07:58 PM
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You sure run across some neat stuff!
no TV in the house....
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Old 01-24-2019, 07:42 PM
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Good morning! Glad to see your still hanging in there. Always enjoy reading your posts. I usually dont have anything to add, cause you clearly know what the hell your doing. And I dont..
Farmer Chad, you **do** know what you are doing, on tons of points! Be proud of all you do, and learn from the mistakes. That's the only way anybody gets it in the end.
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Old 01-24-2019, 08:12 PM
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Took the ground cherries that were stored in the barn and DW made two different batches of Jam.... delicious. These are "Goldie" ground cherries. We'll definitely be growing them again.

Always store your ground cherries with the husks on, they last longer that way.



Remove the hulls:



Following this recipe for the "pectin" batch (http://www.cooks.com/recipe/dl8ob4tc...erry-jam.html)
3 c. ripe ground cherries
1/4 c. lemon juice (or Real Lemon)
1/2 c. water
1 pkg. Sure-Jel
3 c. sugar
To a quart saucepan, add ground cherries, lemon, water, and Sure-Jel. Bring cherries to a boil and mash them. Be sure they are all mashed so they'll absorb the sugar. Add sugar. Boil according to directions on Sure-Jel package. This will make 3 medium jars of jam.


Following this recipe for the without pectin batch ( http://www.cooks.com/recipe/w0j80z8/...herry-jam.html )
5 c. berries
1/2 c. water
4 c. sugar
1/2 can (6 oz. size) frozen orange juice
4 tbsp. lemon juice
Remove husks and wash berries. Measure berries and water. Bring to boil and cook until berries burst. Add sugar and can frozen orange juice concentrate, not diluted and lemon juice. Cook for 30 minutes stirring often to prevent scorching. Jar and seal.


Cooking:


On the way to the water bath canner:


Of course, there was a bit that was set aside for 'testing'....



inMichigan
I am so tickled to see your ground cherries! I grow those too! mostly for fresh eating, but also make jam, I like to add some grated fresh ginger for extra zing!
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:05 PM
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We've been planting Tennessee Red Valencia Peanut for several generations here in SE Michigan. These are some of the seeds I've selected for direct seeding this Spring:



Peanuts are a staple crop that provides a nice source of protein and calories if you don't have any allergies. They also can fix nitrogen for free fertilizer.

inMichigan
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Old 05-06-2019, 08:48 AM
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no TV in the house....
That's funny! I pulled my cable just over one year ago and when my TV puked out, didn't replace it. Don't miss it. I have plenty to do and streaming on my tablet is much cheaper anyway! Not to mention no commercials.
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Old 06-20-2019, 07:39 PM
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Rain, wet, rain, ... is this going to be like the year without a summer?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer
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Old 06-20-2019, 09:00 PM
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It's been challenging so far.
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Old 07-06-2019, 09:40 PM
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Even here in Michigan, rice is a staple crop that can be grown. There are two kinds of rice: paddy (like you're probably thinking about) and upland. Paddy needs a period of 'flooding' which doesn't work so well if you don't have a lot of water. I don't know anybody growing paddy rice, yet. However, upland rice grows essentially like wheat or barley. We've grown it for several years, selecting seeds from the strongest plants.

There are many varieties to choose from... such as https://www.sherckseeds.com/seeds/grains/rice/ however, be mindful of how many 'frost free' growing days you really have.

This one is Zerawchanica Rice:


This one is Loto Rice:


It's said that the yields can be 10 pounds of rice per 100 sq foot. We'll see what we get. There are really only two downsides to rice:
a) They grow slowly at first when direct seeded and look a lot like crab grass, so, early weeding is a nightmare. Starting indoors and transplanting is a great way to get a jump on the weeds.
b) The seeds have a 'hull' that must be removed before eating. There are various methods of dehulling mentioned on the internet. Most are not perfect, but are sufficient for homestead use.

inMichigan
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Old 07-07-2019, 08:52 AM
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They grow slowly at first when direct seeded and look a lot like crab grass, so, early weeding is a nightmare. Starting indoors and transplanting is a great way to get a jump on the weeds.
inMichigan
They're really pretty! But you're right in that they sure look like crab grass. How tall are the sets before you plant them out? And what's your in row spacing?
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