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Old 06-14-2019, 11:37 AM
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I am so disgusted with our fruit trees right now I want to chop them all down for firewood.

We have yet to have ANY decent fruit. The trees were here when we bought the place, an entire orchard , peaches, apples, plums, cherries, apricots. The trees ( except the peaches) look ok. The leaves look ok, but the fruit either doesn't grow at all ( no fruit) , it falls off before ripe, or if it does manage to hang on it is so wormy and moldy, you can't do anything with it. We took samples to the ag extension office to have them tested and got a very large list of things to spray the trees with back last year. Did that this year sprayed for fungus, bacteria and pests. No good. The huge apricot trees had only about 10 apricots on them, and they all fell on the ground, rotten, before ripe. The peaches look as diseased as ever, the cherries look like little mummies on the tree, and the plums fell off before ripe. The apples have black spots on them. We tried fertilizing them with commercial fertilizer this year also. Last year we just put composted manure around them.
SW Virginia, zone 5 ( mountains, about 2500 ft elevation)

Any thoughts?
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Old 06-14-2019, 12:15 PM
RufusJ RufusJ is online now
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Another one for jelly in the South is crabapple. I grew up in north Louisiana and we had a prolific crabapple tree. Mom made crabapple jelly for many a year.
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Old 06-14-2019, 12:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonya1 View Post
I am so disgusted with our fruit trees right now I want to chop them all down for firewood.

We have yet to have ANY decent fruit. The trees were here when we bought the place, an entire orchard , peaches, apples, plums, cherries, apricots. The trees ( except the peaches) look ok. The leaves look ok, but the fruit either doesn't grow at all ( no fruit) , it falls off before ripe, or if it does manage to hang on it is so wormy and moldy, you can't do anything with it. We took samples to the ag extension office to have them tested and got a very large list of things to spray the trees with back last year. Did that this year sprayed for fungus, bacteria and pests. No good. The huge apricot trees had only about 10 apricots on them, and they all fell on the ground, rotten, before ripe. The peaches look as diseased as ever, the cherries look like little mummies on the tree, and the plums fell off before ripe. The apples have black spots on them. We tried fertilizing them with commercial fertilizer this year also. Last year we just put composted manure around them.
SW Virginia, zone 5 ( mountains, about 2500 ft elevation)

Any thoughts?
I have very poor soil and normally do not fertilize because I never get around to doing so. Sometimes over application of fertilizer is not good. Also sometimes pruning will help and I assume your trees are getting enough sun.
I have good crops on some trees and not so much on others. I have many varieties of pears and if one cultivar is not doing well others will be. Stone fruit often need spraying.
Make sure you have the varieties that match your climate. Check on neighbors and see what they growing with success.
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Old 06-14-2019, 01:33 PM
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I have very poor soil and normally do not fertilize because I never get around to doing so. Sometimes over application of fertilizer is not good. Also sometimes pruning will help and I assume your trees are getting enough sun.
I have good crops on some trees and not so much on others. I have many varieties of pears and if one cultivar is not doing well others will be. Stone fruit often need spraying.
Make sure you have the varieties that match your climate. Check on neighbors and see what they growing with success.
The trees were here, planted by the Amish, they should know what they are doing....Amish neighbors have fruit trees that look as bad as ours , they are now spraying also. New ones look ok, but they are some odd things like Asian pears. Those seem to do well here, but I don't particularly like them.
Maybe it is the wet weather?
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Old 06-14-2019, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by sonya1 View Post
The trees were here, planted by the Amish, they should know what they are doing....Amish neighbors have fruit trees that look as bad as ours , they are now spraying also. New ones look ok, but they are some odd things like Asian pears. Those seem to do well here, but I don't particularly like them.
Maybe it is the wet weather?
New diseases and new versions of old diseases are traveling the country.
I do grow some Asian pears that have the low chill hours needed for our region NWFL. Some are susceptible to fireblight. I happen to like them. One relatively resistant asian pear that is more like an European pear is olton broussard, but I do not know of any nursery that sells it. The fruit looks like green to brown apples. They ripen on the tree as do all asian pears.
Unfortunately I am not able to post it since this site does not allow copy paste and I and not get a website address for the picture.
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Old 06-14-2019, 03:42 PM
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Sonya1,

Not to goad you into chopping those trees down, but I'm also a musician with a little knowledge of construction and the popular thinking these days is that fruit bearing trees actually make for very good tone woods (a "tone wood" being one that would be preferred for construction of musical instruments because they enhance the sound of the instrument).
So, if you do chop them down, you might want to market the lumber to any luthier's or Drum smith's in your area.


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Old 06-14-2019, 04:47 PM
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Sonya1,

Not to goad you into chopping those trees down, but I'm also a musician with a little knowledge of construction and the popular thinking these days is that fruit bearing trees actually make for very good tone woods (a "tone wood" being one that would be preferred for construction of musical instruments because they enhance the sound of the instrument).
So, if you do chop them down, you might want to market the lumber to any luthier's or Drum smith's in your area.


DCman
They are said to make excellent firewood also. but I would suggest grafting and working the trees to cultivars that will do better for you. But first you need to know which varieties would be more suitable for you.
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Old 06-16-2019, 10:24 AM
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Catfeet,

Doesn't this site have a "for sale" section?
Might be time to set up your store front!
Heh...I wouldn't know the first thing about shipping fruit. Now, if you wanted some pits, I'd be happy to send those for the price of postage. PM me if you'd like some.
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Old 06-16-2019, 01:23 PM
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Might at least behoove you to go talk to someone at a UPS/FedEx/DHL/etc. office and your local USPS, too.
Between all of them, you should get a pretty good idea of the best way to send the fruit.
The packaging office should have something to help cushion the fruit, as well.
I know USPS does "Priority Mail", which should get your fruit anywhere in the continental US within 3 days.
If your fruit goes bad within that time, I don't think your problem is with shipping.
….of course, if its something you don't want to do, that's perfectly acceptable, too.
I'm just saying, you've got a very large "customer base" here because you're reaching out to anyone who's a member.
Seems like you should be able to move at least some of that excess fruit you complained about.


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Old 07-11-2019, 03:26 PM
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I don’t know much about gardening, but maybe this will help. I have very limited land so I used graph paper and planned out my orchard. I used a pencil so you I could erase. You can see how much you can fit, if your garden is going to get unwanted shade, etc. I planted trees that were naturally semi dwarfs or could be pruned to a certain width. By keeping them small I was able to get different fruits rather than a huge one time harvest. I got 13 different fruit trees and shrubs in an 80x56 area with space left over for other things so it can be done in a small area. Once I picked the varieties I did a chart of when the trees would fruit using online sources so I could plan for fresh fruit year round. Keep in mind fruiting times might be a bit off for you because of area differences, but it will give you an idea. Something to keep in mind is that apple varieties that we can grow in Florida keep longer than others without going mushy. Try and buy local plants whenever possible since they are already acclimated. Im in zone 9b in FL and I can get fruit year round, but worst time is Nov to Feb. If you are allergic to latex use gloves and be careful with the milky substance that comes out of the figs when you cut them from the plant. Not a tree, but if you like olives you might consider planting a thornless variety of capers.
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Old 07-11-2019, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Offrink View Post
I only have 50 or so fruit trees. Apples, apricots, peaches, pears, Cherry, paw paw, plum, mulberry, and crab apple. Have a dozen very large black walnut trees, a few Carpathian English walnut, lots of oak, and a few pecan.

Most have only been planted since I moved here 5 years ago (mulberry, crab apple, and black walnut were here prior) so they are just getting into producing fruit.
I would love to have the room to be able to have that many trees!
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Old 07-11-2019, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flofli View Post
I have very limited land so I used graph paper and planned out my orchard. I used a pencil so I could erase. You can see how much you can fit, if your garden is going to get unwanted shade, etc.
Now that's a smart idea!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flofli
I got 13 different fruit trees and shrubs in an 80x56 area with space left over for other things...
WOW!!!
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