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Alaska Secession foxkitten86 General Discussion 8 03-01-2018 10:21 PM
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Old 10-05-2018, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by buck3m View Post
Assuming you're serious, how so? What do you think were the greatest dangers on a that trip?
I’ve done my share of solo trips back in the 70’s in California and Michigan’s upper with no issues.

I’ve found that common sense and due diligence takes care of most issues concerning the four legged critters.

Most problems I’ve had came from two legged critters and Mother Nature

Good job on 1,500 miles, I’ll bet it was fun the best I’ve done is just under 500 miles and I thought that was far
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Old 10-05-2018, 11:06 AM
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Solo is far more dangerous? We hear that a lot. It is if one lacks experience and judgment.

Pairs make arguably more mistakes than highly experienced "Lone Ranger" types. The advantage is that one can often help the other in times of need. The disadvantage is that a lot of bad advice tends to be expelled. Some examples I have heard:
1) You won't need a compass.
2) You don't need a change of clothes for this little overnighter.
3) You can follow in my boot foot prints.
4) Lets all forge this mighty river right here. That wide flat spot is too much of a detour. -We got away with that somehow which still strikes me as a miracle. We were pushed downstream by the current while standing on slippery rocks with a 70 pound backpack carrying all supplies and weeks from help. How stupid was that group decision? Hey, it was three against one.
5) You don't need to bring too much food. The article says the fishing is amazing. Not even a bite in three weeks.
6) Lets toboggan down this new hill. It'll be great.
7) Lets climb this cliff.


Many arguments for operating as a pair. I will argue there are equally viable arguments for the properly experienced to operate when they choose. One argument is that there are usually zero people that are available to do what I do when I do it. One reason is liking to avoid the week-end crowds. Plus my three dogs are often more fun that listening to someone complain about this, that, and the other. That they need to go home now.

* I am tired of listening to ******* complain about adventurers. I get it, they are afraid of water, motorcycles, bugs, snakes, bears, darkness, not being able to see the car. Well - stay home then. Complain about those who choose life then. Snowflakes complaining about adventurers? Part of the package.

**A chain is as strong as the weakest link.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:00 AM
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Bump: I just thought this adventure was too good to see it fade away. I'm really surprised to see only a couple of pages for a real survival adventure. Seems like when some wannabe posts that he's going to run off to the wilderness and has no experience at all, and totally impractical ideas and equipment lists, he'll get dozens of pages saying, "yeah, you're da man, go for it". And then dozens more posts saying something like beware of ticks or rabid raccoons.

Buck, I'd like to hear more details. Were fish a major part of your diet? What did you lack or miss the most, either in equipment or food?

When I get back from a long trip in the wilderness, I crave big chocolate malt milkshakes.
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Old 10-09-2018, 10:30 AM
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...Buck, I'd like to hear more details. Were fish a major part of your diet? What did you lack or miss the most, either in equipment or food?

When I get back from a long trip in the wilderness, I crave big chocolate malt milkshakes.
Fish weren't a major part of my diet, but they were a real treat when I ate them. It's always good to have real, fresh food. I like to cook grayling by just gutting them, then building a fire on a gravel bar and letting it burn down to good coals, then laying grayling on the coals, putting a few coals on top. It takes only a few minutes and although the skin gets burned the meat does not. No cleanup, works really well. When I caught a big pike for example though, I was more conventional and wrapped the fillets in foil.

Blueberries were also a big treat when I did my long portage. It was good excuse to stop and rest and chow down.

As you know on my Fortress of the Bears trip I lived exclusively "off the land." I had nothing but time and my mission was to eat natural food and not to travel many miles. On this trip the mission was to cross Alaska and I had access to plenty of backpacking/camping type of food so I did a lot less foraging.

On this trip my dream would probably have been a chocolate shake, AND two huge cheeseburgers and fries. On the Fortress of the Bears trip my cravings leaned more towards carbs: freshly baked bread or a stack of pancakes swimming in butter and maple syrup.

I was pretty happy with my gear. One item I need to get figure out is dry pants/waders for paddling. I've found that for LIVING in stocking foot waders, walking through brush, paddling for long days, day after day, slight leaks eventually develop.

Any ideas?

Here's my latest post.
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Old 10-09-2018, 11:02 PM
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I know many talk about salmon and halibut (for the obvious reasons), but nothing beats a fresh caught grayling or trout for a quick meal over a fire. I have a seasoning I make myself with dried cilantro, lemon rind with a touch of salt and pepper that does the trick. Grayling are such a joy to catch and cook. My wife would love your method of cooking.

I was going to recommend goretex waders, but I see you list that. Good goretex holds up well in the Alaskan heavy brush.
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Old 10-10-2018, 07:25 PM
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Originally Posted by buck3m View Post


I was pretty happy with my gear. One item I need to get figure out is dry pants/waders for paddling. I've found that for LIVING in stocking foot waders, walking through brush, paddling for long days, day after day, slight leaks eventually develop.

Any ideas?

Here's my latest post.

When I'm canoeing, I'm usually wet. The only thing I do is wear nylon and goretex pants and muck (cannery) boots which are fairly decent hiking boots. Then if I need to get into deeper water slip on the waders. Only takes a few minutes.

I get a lot more ideas from you than I'm able to give.

And like Ak John said those trout and graying in natural waters are unbeatable. One big thing I've learned to do on the grayling is to split them before cooking. Firms up the meat nicely when broiled and browned on both sides.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:18 PM
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Start now from the south and walk north.
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:47 AM
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impressive!
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:06 AM
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Thanks for putting this out here for us to enjoy. With retirement about 9 years away, section hiking the CDT is about as exciting as I can afford for now.
My wife keeps wanting me to go on an Alaskan Cruise. I keep telling her when I finally do go to Alaska, it's going to be a one way trip.

Of course I have a plan B, if the winters are to cold, I'll buy a one-way ticket back...lol
I did two assignments with the Air Force during my career and went back when I "retired" for another 7 years before heading back to the lower 48.

Taking an Alaskan Cruise and saying you've been to Alaska is like a European going to Disney World and saying they've seen the United States.

I've been as far west as the island of Shemya, back when it was still an Air Force base and later after I retired, I took a job there with a federal contractor. Shemya is a 6 hour flight from Anchorage to the West.

They have a jacket there with the site logo on the back and it say "Shemya, it's not the end of the world but, on a clear day you can see it from there."

I've been down in Juneau a couple of times, Up to Cold Foot via the haul road, and all over in little puddle jumper planes to Alaskan Native Villages.

I look forward to reading about your trip. One of my sons lives in Fairbanks and the other one lives with his wife and 5 kids in Anchorage.

Alaska should be high on people's bucket lists but, don't just settle for the boat ride.. Take the bus to Denali and go in the park.. That's where you'll see a good bit of wildlife..

And make sure you plan it for when the salmon are running..
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Alaskajohn View Post
I know many talk about salmon and halibut (for the obvious reasons), but nothing beats a fresh caught grayling or trout for a quick meal over a fire. I have a seasoning I make myself with dried cilantro, lemon rind with a touch of salt and pepper that does the trick. Grayling are such a joy to catch and cook. My wife would love your method of cooking.

I was going to recommend goretex waders, but I see you list that. Good goretex holds up well in the Alaskan heavy brush.
When I traveled with the Air Force and contractors I worked for into remote Alaska (Google White Alice Sites) during my first tour and any other time I've traveled light, I always carried a 4 piece Eagle Clay rod in an aluminum tube. The bottom of the rod could be flipped one way to use it with a bait casting reel and flip it around to use it with a fly reel.

It's light weight tackle so I wouldn't go trying to hook into even a red salmon with that rod but, it's definitely a Greyling rod and I've had many a bank side Greyling dinner while my crew was back at the base or camp cooking a dining hall meal.
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:23 AM
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Don't mean to hog this thread but, I've thought many times about doing a bike ride across the US.. I live in SW Washington and Astoria up in Astoria, WA is one of the places a lot of folks like to start those rides from. They dip the wheel of their bick in the Pacific Ocean there and do it again when they reach the Atlantic.

I've got a very nice Cannondale mountain bike that I've put road tires on in place of the knobbys that it came with. The bike doesn't have shocks but, that just means less to break.

I've also pondered pulling a trailer like this one a guy named Paul Elkins makes.. Good use for recycled pallets and election signs.. I'd love to have that recumbent bike instead of my Cannondale..

My main goal is to do the whole thing and lose a lot of weight along the way. If I have to get off and push the bike up hills, so be it.. I'd like to figure out the flattest route though.

That's up there on my bucket list I guess..
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Old 10-11-2018, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kl0an View Post
When I traveled with the Air Force and contractors I worked for into remote Alaska (Google White Alice Sites) during my first tour and any other time I've traveled light, I always carried a 4 piece Eagle Clay rod in an aluminum tube. The bottom of the rod could be flipped one way to use it with a bait casting reel and flip it around to use it with a fly reel.

It's light weight tackle so I wouldn't go trying to hook into even a red salmon with that rod but, it's definitely a Greyling rod and I've had many a bank side Greyling dinner while my crew was back at the base or camp cooking a dining hall meal.
Which White Alice sites, if you don't mind me asking?

I had an Eagle Claw rod just like it. Finally broke it after thirty years! Maybe because I was using it on salmon. It was a good old friend.
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Old 10-12-2018, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by buck3m View Post
Fish weren't a major part of my diet, but they were a real treat when I ate them. It's always good to have real, fresh food. I like to cook grayling by just gutting them, then building a fire on a gravel bar and letting it burn down to good coals, then laying grayling on the coals, putting a few coals on top. It takes only a few minutes and although the skin gets burned the meat does not. No cleanup, works really well. When I caught a big pike for example though, I was more conventional and wrapped the fillets in foil.

Blueberries were also a big treat when I did my long portage. It was good excuse to stop and rest and chow down.

As you know on my Fortress of the Bears trip I lived exclusively "off the land." I had nothing but time and my mission was to eat natural food and not to travel many miles. On this trip the mission was to cross Alaska and I had access to plenty of backpacking/camping type of food so I did a lot less foraging.

On this trip my dream would probably have been a chocolate shake, AND two huge cheeseburgers and fries. On the Fortress of the Bears trip my cravings leaned more towards carbs: freshly baked bread or a stack of pancakes swimming in butter and maple syrup.

I was pretty happy with my gear. One item I need to get figure out is dry pants/waders for paddling. I've found that for LIVING in stocking foot waders, walking through brush, paddling for long days, day after day, slight leaks eventually develop.

Any ideas?

Here's my latest post.
Remember hiking through a Canadian valley and using game trails while it pretty much rained or drizzled for four days. We were constantly brushing against wet willows and such. Everything felt wet, it got pretty dismal with no sunshine.

Seams is where moisture often finds a way in. Try sealing seams. Also consider possible rainy seasons. Who, in their right mind, likes to hike in the rain?
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Old 10-12-2018, 11:26 AM
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Default Rocks exploding in campfire

This is an issue I'd forgotten to mention. I fought wildfire for a living, and have built countless campfires, and I was still slow to catch on in this situation...

I'd built a lunch fire on a gravel bar. I heard a loud pop and embers flew. I figured it was the wood so didn't think much of it. There was another, much more violent pop where the fire was partially scattered. What the?

It was then I noticed there was a larger rock underneath the fire, and rock flakes had exploded off of it when the water in the moist rock vaporized and expanded. I also noticed the smell of something burning. An ember burnt a small hole in my waders. (That hole was easily repaired.)

I knew the theory, but that exploding rock caught me off guard.
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Old 10-13-2018, 01:52 AM
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Which White Alice sites, if you don't mind me asking?

I had an Eagle Claw rod just like it. Finally broke it after thirty years! Maybe because I was using it on salmon. It was a good old friend.
I was at Tin City twice, Bethel a few times, King Salmon, and Tatalina. Tatalina was probably the only one still being used besides Tin City that I visited. Not as White Alice though, they'd been converted to OTH Radar sites..
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Old 10-13-2018, 03:57 AM
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Great thread..........thanks to all who have contributed.
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