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Old 02-08-2018, 05:07 AM
Vardegas Vardegas is offline
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Hi, i like this thread, but there is one thing that is almoust never mentioned.

You have to protect your filter from freezing!!! In winter you have to keep it on yor body, not in bag, so it wont freeze. After freezing the filter is useless, because the crystal of frozen wather will damage the filter from inside.

As of sawyer mini, the 100 000 galons of filtrated watter is .. well not true, it is just marketing. Not saying they dont work, but you shoul test it befour you keep repeating these numbers as "facts".

As a short term metod of purification i preffer tablets. Fill up yor canteen, throw in one pill and in half an hour you have safe watter to drink (removes bacteria and viruses), if the watter is dirty, you shoul pre filter it to.

Long term, or if you have the time,... prefilter the watter and boil it. Simple.
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Old 02-08-2018, 11:33 AM
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I have several of both but have confess to neither using either. I like the idea of the Sawyer better, though.

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Old 02-08-2018, 01:58 PM
Paveglass Paveglass is offline
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Thanks for the review! My son gave me one for Christmas and I see it as a perfect way to stay hydrated while I am fishing in the high country. Water there is clear, and this should work well...sounds like a short hose would be a good idea. Just in case of failure I will carry a liter of water from home but this will allow me to take several pounds out of my pack. Looking forward to trying it next summer.

I do find the Sawyer Mini to be a great backpacking and camping filter and I use one for those kind of trips. The LifeStraw will be for day outings.
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Old 02-08-2018, 04:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paveglass View Post
Thanks for the review! My son gave me one for Christmas and I see it as a perfect way to stay hydrated while I am fishing in the high country. Water there is clear, and this should work well...sounds like a short hose would be a good idea. Just in case of failure I will carry a liter of water from home but this will allow me to take several pounds out of my pack. Looking forward to trying it next summer.

I do find the Sawyer Mini to be a great backpacking and camping filter and I use one for those kind of trips. The LifeStraw will be for day outings.
Why not use the Sawyer for day outings? It's much better in every way and perfect for day outings.
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Old 02-08-2018, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Marlin94 View Post
I have several of both but have confess to neither using either. I like the idea of the Sawyer better, though.

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I had and tried to use the Sawyer water bottle. No bueno!
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Old 02-09-2018, 12:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post
I'd like to share a tip that may help with that:

I keep a few large patches of silk (cut from thrift-store shirts, skirts.) along with my LifeStraw in my camping gear. If the water is not clear, I use it to pre-filter my water before purifying it with the LifeStraw. (I pour the murky water thru the silk into a container before dipping the LifeStraw into it.)

Because of its super tight weave, silk can be used as an effective pre-filter, or in an extreme pinch, alone as an expedient water filter:

https://www.fic.nih.gov/News/GlobalH...er-filter.aspx

https://inhabitat.com/ecouterre/wome...ainst-cholera/
Both of those links refer to using cotton saris, not silk. I'm not sure they're equivalent for water filtration. Typically, silk is not as "fuzzy" as cotton, so might not filter as well.
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Old 02-09-2018, 03:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Regina3000 View Post
Both of those links refer to using cotton saris, not silk. I'm not sure they're equivalent for water filtration. Typically, silk is not as "fuzzy" as cotton, so might not filter as well.

Regina, you are right, both links referred to cotton saris, and if you had not posted, I wouldn’t have realized that I forgot to include a link to show why my personal pre-filter preference is silk. A good piece of tightly woven silk has a reputation for filtering a lot “cleaner” than most fabrics (see below). I also prefer it over cotton for other reasons as well: it dries super fast, and takes up almost no space in my hiking/camping gear (silk can be folded and fit into a ridiculously small space). Although I use it only as a pre-filter, I wouldn’t hesitate to use a tightly-woven silk or tightly-woven cotton cloth for an expedient filter IF for some reason, my store-bought filter was lost or destroyed, or if I was not in a position to boil water. Of course, boiling water is one of the best ways to kill viruses, which many popular commercial water filters cannot filter out (do your research; some do). Viruses are considered a major cause of human waterborne and serious water-related diseases, usually from an incident of human or animal feces upstream or contaminated water runoff.


http://www.appropedia.org/Fabric_Filter

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For the choice in fabric, it is necessary that it be tightly woven, and that it is made from a stiff material (any stretchiness will allow the gaps between the fibers to widen, and the water to seep through without being properly filtered). One material which is most commonly suitable for this purpose is silk, because unlike synthetic materials, silk fabrics do not exhibit a wide range of flexibility.
(Also, it is easy enough to compare cotton and silk's "stretchiness" by pouring water through the cloths and observing the difference.)



There was another lab test involving seven different types of cloth, including silk (which got the highest marks for filtration), but I can't seem to find it again with a quick search. But I did find this interesting comment on Quora.com.

https://www.quora.com/Which-fabric-c...ater-instantly

Quote:
... some months I went through this experiment in our lab in search of affordable filters for poor people . The silk fabric did the best job of filtering the water. It had the lowest visual turbidity at one percent. The silk had a tight weave, and It was observed that it had an average of a ten minute gravity flow rate through the fabric and the net flow was twenty-two mL. Although silk did the best job, the price is a concern. But if we reuse the silk clothes after proper sterilisation optimising it's life, it can be used.
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Old 02-09-2018, 02:06 PM
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I don't know of any virus that could survive long at all in the waterways of North America due to the temp range required to survive (constant) very little temp change will destroy them.... that is not true in many 3rd world countries where it is much warmer pretty much year 'round. At least that is what my research has shown me . (though I do have a major filter that does virus most likely not needed here)
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Old 02-09-2018, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Aceoky View Post
I don't know of any virus that could survive long at all in the waterways of North America due to the temp range required to survive (constant) very little temp change will destroy them....

These days, waterborne viruses, bacteria and parasites in North American waterways have become so common that they are given a name: Recreational Waterborne Illnesses (RWIs).

Here are just a few (of many) sources that caution against virus-contaminated water in our natural waterways.


Minnesota Department of Health:

http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/i...aterborne.html

Quote:
Recreational water illnesses (RWIs) are caused by germs and chemicals found in the water we swim or play in, including...lakes, rivers, or oceans. They are spread by swallowing, breathing in mists or aerosols of, or having contact with contaminated water.

What are possible causes of RWIs?
The most common type of RWI is diarrhea. Diarrheal illnesses can be caused by germs such as Cryptosporidium, E. coli O157, norovirus, and Shigella. Germs that cause other types of RWIs include Pseudomonas and Naegleria fowleri.



Idaho Dept of Health & Welfare:

http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/He...3/Default.aspx


Quote:
Recreational waters may be natural bodies of water, such as oceans, lakes, rivers, ponds, and hot springs; artificial bodies of water such as reservoirs; or man-made facilities such as swimming pools, plunge pools, splash parks, water parks, hot tubs, and spas.

Recreational waterborne illnesses (RWIs) are illnesses that result from swallowing, breathing, or having contact with recreational water. RWIs can be caused by microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, protozoa, algae, viruses), other parasites, or chemicals.


https://www.nrs.com/safety_tips/whatsinthewater.asp

Quote:
Viruses carried in water, that infect humans, have only one source, human feces from infected carriers. Waterborne viruses that cause disease include: rotavirus, caliciviruses-which now include the norovirus group with Norwalk virus, adenovirus, astrovirus, Hepatitis A & E, and enteroviruses (which include those that cause Polio and Viral-Meningitis).

All it takes is for water runoff or other contamination from a single hiker, camper or vagrant... It is understood that we can be infected even if a small amount of infectious material is extremely diluted.


Be safe, y'all...
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Old 02-11-2018, 05:56 PM
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So boil the water is what you are saying?

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Old 02-11-2018, 05:59 PM
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That's one way to do it, but I like to have back up plans in place in case I cannot.
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Old 02-24-2018, 06:28 PM
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Vardegas said:
Quote:
You have to protect your filter from freezing!!! In winter you have to keep it on yor body, not in bag, so it wont freeze. After freezing the filter is useless, because the crystal of frozen wather will damage the filter from inside.
My question to that... do you only have to keep it from freezing once it's been used? What if it's in a GHB but has never been used yet?
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Old 02-24-2018, 06:57 PM
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Laying on your belly, sucking up water is far from ideal.

You are better off getting a camelback and filling it up. Using an in-line filter, as above. This will give you clean water on the go. The other good alternative is the various water bottles with built in filters.

Having the ability to fill-up and go, is much better in all situations. I would also recommend you carry some purification tablet too, just in case you need them, as they are small/light and your life may depend on it.

Katadyn Micropur MP1 is a microbiological tablet water purifier, that uses chlorine dioxide. Much more palatable than iodine tablets.
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Old 02-24-2018, 07:06 PM
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One thing I would add AFTER the water filter is a charcoal filter. You'll like the taste of the water much better.
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vardegas View Post
Hi, i like this thread, but there is one thing that is almoust never mentioned.

You have to protect your filter from freezing!!! In winter you have to keep it on yor body, not in bag, so it wont freeze. After freezing the filter is useless, because the crystal of frozen wather will damage the filter from inside.
Very valid point. And very much worth taking note of, when it comes to this filter.

Quote:
As of sawyer mini, the 100 000 galons of filtrated watter is .. well not true, it is just marketing. Not saying they dont work, but you shoul test it befour you keep repeating these numbers as "facts".
Have you proved that these claimed facts are incorrect? Would love to know how you came to this conclusion.

This units requires back flushing form time to time as the filtration system is the same fine mesh material used for dialysis machines. Particulate will eventually clog the pores. So does require some minimal maintenance that way.

Even if the filter is only 50% efficient and only filers 50,000 Gal, well then it'll only last me about 137 years... and that is filtering 1 Gal water per day.

Hmm... according to my math and longevity projections, I'd never be able to find out if it lives up to its potential.

Essentially, even at a 25% efficiency it still will last me over 68 years.

Which is longer than I'll ever need one for.

So for $30, I feel everyone I know should have one. It is really that simple!
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Old 02-25-2018, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by OldCorps View Post
One thing I would add AFTER the water filter is a charcoal filter. You'll like the taste of the water much better.
If you are at "base camp" a cheap Britta Filter will do just fine for this.

Not sure what the best portable ones would be.
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Old 02-27-2018, 12:11 AM
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Is there an inline charcoal filter to use with the sawyer mini?
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Old 02-27-2018, 01:34 AM
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Originally Posted by bluesue View Post
Is there an inline charcoal filter to use with the sawyer mini?
One youtube video shows some Sawyer Mini Modifications and he adds a small in-line Berkey Filter. Been meaning to follow up on that one to see if i can find it.

Here's another version of an inline carbon filter
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnSdvxQgfB0
around the 2 minute mark...

This is the link to the British Amazon site for the one he uses:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Camelbak-90...k+Fresh+Filter

There's loads of great suggestions for different modifications. Good to watch through some and find what fits best for you.
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...i+modification
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:33 PM
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Laying on your belly, sucking up water is far from ideal.

You are better off getting a camelback and filling it up. Using an in-line filter, as above. This will give you clean water on the go. The other good alternative is the various water bottles with built in filters.

Having the ability to fill-up and go, is much better in all situations. I would also recommend you carry some purification tablet too, just in case you need them, as they are small/light and your life may depend on it.

Katadyn Micropur MP1 is a microbiological tablet water purifier, that uses chlorine dioxide. Much more palatable than iodine tablets.[/QUOTE]

Don't take this as a disagreement with using the camelback, but keep in mind that it is now contaminated with whatever is in the water to begin with. I may have read that wrong and you meant the filter was inline before the CB also.
On pre-filtering using cloth, I always thought that using cheesecloth was a good way of doing it. Is that wrong?
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Old 03-02-2018, 09:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prairieskygirl View Post
Vardegas said:

My question to that... do you only have to keep it from freezing once it's been used? What if it's in a GHB but has never been used yet?
If there is water in it the freezing will cause expansion and may damage the filter.

If it has not been used or it has been thoroughly dried out, then freezing is a non-issue
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