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Old 01-19-2018, 07:57 PM
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Default CACHE What to Cache and Preserving a Cache.



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CACHE What to Cache and Preserving a Cache.

If you absolutely have to leave, and your home is destroyed or you cannot get to your BOB, it would be wise to have supplies stashed in a remote location. The only way to keep them safe would be a cache buried in some wilderness area, deep enough to not set of most metal detectors.

Since weight and size would not be a problem like a BOB, we should be able to stash some really nice equipment. That might include heavy cookware, a larger tent, full sized tools, and other equipment. This assumes a significantly remote and isolated location where you might be able to establish a relatively long term BOL. Not to be confused with a cache where you stop by to pick up a few traveling supplies along the way. Here is a preliminary list. Much of this stuff can be bought cheap at garage sales or thrift stores.

Also, what is the best way to preserve these various items for long term underground storage?
Suggestions are welcome.

Large heavy duty frying pan
Small heavy duty frying pan
Cooking pot or stew pot
Regular cooking and eating utensils
Steel camp fire grill
Aluminum foil
Toiletries & Soap
First Aid & Medical Supplies
Various long shelf life foodstuffs
Garbage Bags
Matches & Tinder
Towels & Cloths
Knife & Multitool
Fishing Gear

D-handle Shovel or Spade
Full size Axe or Fireman's Axe
Full size pruning saw or wood saw

Larger Tent with ground cloth and rain fly
Sleeping bag
Camo concealment netting
Area Maps & Compass

.22 Revolver & Ammo
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Old 01-19-2018, 09:11 PM
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Caching is a great idea in addition to any other method of protecting their stores of food, ammo, and gear.

I did something similar the first year I purchased my land here in Oklahoma. I did it because I needed to keep working at my engineering job in California, until I met the minimum retirement age of 55. Since my job required me to travel frequently to a supplier in Joplin, Mo, I wanted to Cache some survival gear in this area.

For the first eight years, my ranch was a bug out location, and my Cache was my "Not So Great" chance for survival. I dug up this Cache after I retired and moved here in 2015.
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Old 01-19-2018, 09:23 PM
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Next time I burry a Cache in this area, I'm going to use steel 55 gal drums, and I'm going to use my backhoe to dig the hole. I will dig the hole four feet deep in order to keep the top of the drum below the frost line.

I lost track of my ammo caches here. Fortunately I had turned out some Guinea hogs in that area, and they dug up my ammo. You can't beat having animals that help with the ranch work.
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Old 01-19-2018, 09:30 PM
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If you don't want to set off a metal detector with something as large as a cache, then the top needs to be at least 18 in deep. Most metal detectors won't go deeper than a foot at most but I cant think of that go that deep.

Of course utility locate equipment will still find it.
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Old 01-19-2018, 09:48 PM
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I would include:

Several five pound containers of salt, for meat preservation and making jerky

Some containers for food and water storage

Sewing kit and assorted glues and epoxies for fixing gear

At least one really good external frame backpack, for retrieving game

Solar panels and an eReader with lots of reading material on it, for those long dark winter nights - works well to illuminate your shelter, too, though you might want to be careful not to light your tent up if you're trying to hide LOLOL.

Flashlight, solar battery charger for the flashlight batteries.

Emergency radio, and headphones. You'll want to know what's going on in the outside world.

Air rifle and pellets -- quieter and more accurate than the revolver for taking small game.

Might consider an electronic game caller. If it's made of meat it's edible in a crisis.
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Old 01-19-2018, 10:15 PM
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It really depends on what type of cache you are talking about from a fixed bunker to a few small PVC canisters.

In a fixed bunker anything and everything could be put in it.

In small canisters your limited on what and how much you can cache. Obviously the bigger the container the bigger and more stuff you can cache.

I'm going to focus on small caches 5gal buckets and handmade PVC tubes That must be buried by hand and they must be carried at least 2 miles into the bush to the burring site. For the purpose of LONG TERM survival.

For this type of situation I'll first list things I wouldn't burry:

FOOD: animals will smell it and dig it up or rats will chew a hole through it and rob you as well as contaminate /expose everything in it to the elements. unless you willing to bury it 6 ft deep. You would be surprised at just how deep a deer will dig for the smell of salt

FLAMEABLES: like lighter fluid, bug spray, cooking oils...ect. These fluids/ chemicals can ruin other things in your cache tube if your not extremely careful and know what your doing.

SHORT SHELF LIFE: ANYTHING that has a short shelf life of less than 10yrs


Things I would look at caching for long term survival:

TOOLS: ANY and all hand tools. You don't have to have the handles ALL you need is the head you can make a handle while out in the field. I'll give you a small list of what I would consider caching. AXE head, Shovel blade, Files for wood and steel, Saw & blades, Vise grips, Channel locks, Hand drill & bits, Blacksmith hammers, Chisel set, Leather punch set, Leather Awl, Sharpening Stones... ect

AMMUNITION: EVERYONE knows why you need ammo

Clothes: Extra clothes could come in need if you have an unexpected extended stay. This can range from a wool blanket to total camo out fits. I would suggest: WOOL blanket, WOOL socks of different thickness, Thick leather welding gloves, shoes or boots...ect

TRAPS: Steel traps, I prefer conibear traps 110 to 160, RAT traps

PAPERWORK: How to manuals, herbal healing manuals, SaS survival manual... ect

HYGIENE and MEDICAL : Hand soaps and various medical supplies, AS far as TP goes its nice to have for the short term, but its extremely bulky and what are you going to use once it runs out? I would go the old roman way and store a few, "sponge on a stick", as a long term solution.

BASIC SURVIVAL GEAR: Fire starting gear, poncho, tarp , water filter and canteen...ect
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Old 01-19-2018, 10:18 PM
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In an effort to avoid smoke signals, and the ability to extinguish heat signature quickly I have shifted to Largish propane tanks. for heat and cooking. I have 14 of those tanks that look like a five gallon container. They hold a NET WT. 17 pounds propane. They weigh about 25 pounds including the tank, so I can back pack two at a time to remote sites.
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Old 01-19-2018, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THEBLACKPEARL View Post
If you don't want to set off a metal detector with something as large as a cache, then the top needs to be at least 18 in deep. Most metal detectors won't go deeper than a foot at most but I cant think of that go that deep.

Of course utility locate equipment will still find it.
It helps if you live where there are no humans. I no longer bury anything.
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Old 01-19-2018, 11:05 PM
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My thoughts on caches:

First a couple of observations:
Caches, in the context to which this article pertains, hiding items, is pronounced
‘cashes’, and when referring to potpourri type sachets is pronounced ‘cash-ayes’.

The caches I have made have all been similar to one another in design, if not contents. I always wanted to recover the bucket so I had something to carry the items in once recovered, in case I did not have any transport or LBE when I needed the cache.

The way I do it is a bit more expensive and labor intensive getting the cache put in than most, but much easier and faster to recover than the way some do it, which is better than the other way around, I think.

So here goes, for an earth buried bucket cache. A tubular cache container will be about the same. Scout out a likely spot and monitor it for a few weeks or months to make sure it will not likely be discovered by accident. Check the local flood plain maps to see if the area is subject to minor or major flooding. If it is, that does not mean you cannot use the place, but you will need to use the same precautions you would when making an underwater cache.

Make sure there is a spot some distance away where you can cache a couple of things, just under the surface of the ground. Once you are confident that the place is secure enough, make sure you have what you need.

Bag up the items, even the canned ones, in 2-gallon heavy duty Zip-lock freezer bags and stack things as tightly as you can. If it is a food cache, be sure and include everything you will need to use that food. Including a can opener for sure. But I would put in a knife/fork/spoon, folding handle cup with water bottle, water filter, a solid fuel or gel fuel folding stove if needed. I would also have as much water as would fit in the bucket to fill it up completely.

Special note: NEVER put fuels and other flammables in with anything they can contaminate. The same goes for highly aromatic items. If either leaks, they can ruin other items. Not only do you not want fuel soaked food or clothing, or corroded weapons and tools, you also do not want your clothing smelling like gun cleaning solvent.

Once the bucket is packed, keeping it as light as possible, seal the lid with silicone. Use two smaller buckets that are easily carried, rather than one larger, heavier bucket if you need more space.

Have a second, nesting, bucket for each cache bucket you have made up. Find something to put in the empty bucket that will support the cache bucket just shy of being a glove fit when inserted into the empty bucket.

Get a good pick and shovel, plus a small shovel or e-tool, which should be oiled and put in a zip-lock bag; several more buckets or boxes, and fill them with good, clean, dry mortar sand. Get some heavy duty clear plastic sheeting and head for the cache point sometime when it will be very unlikely for anyone to see or come up on you while burying the cache.

Now this is where I do things rather different than most. Move any surface material away carefully before digging. When you dig the hole, make it two good shovel widths larger all around than the diameter of the bucket, especially if you want to recover everything.

Once you are deep enough to have the buckets at least 6" and preferably 12" to 18" below the level of the ground, put in the empty bucket and carefully fill around it with some of the sand until it is stable. Put in the support and then the cache bucket. Make sure it will slide in and out easily. Fill the rest of the hole up to within 6" of the top. Spread out the plastic sheet, digging the hole wider if it is likely to flood or get a lot of rain in the area, so the plastic covers well past the edges of the bucket. Add a bit more sand, making sure none of the plastic shows above it, and finish filling the hole with the dirt that was dug out. Do not leave a depression, but you also do not want a mound. Just enough to allow for a little settling.

Load up the extra buckets/boxes used to bring out the sand with the rest of the dirt and haul it off so there is nothing left indicating a hole was dug. Carefully camouflage the area, replacing any surface materials you moved before digging.

Record the location, using coded instructions, on a coded map. Take the small shovel or e-tool to a spot nearby where you can cache it just a few inches below the surface of the ground. Drop a sawn off piece of broom handle, sharpened slightly on one end nearby, on the surface of the ground.

Have a second set of coded instructions, using alternate landmarks, just in case one or more of the original ones are changed in some way.

If there might be a real problem relocating the cache, such as in a large open area, among really rocky areas, or any area with plain terrain features, bury a
Neodymium rare earth magnet just under the surface of the ground, somewhere near the cache as an ‘anchor point’ from which measurements and bearings can be taken to relocate the cache. One simply walks the area, with a compass attached to a stick so it can be kept close to the ground. Watch the compass needle. When close to one of these powerful magnets the compass needle will deflect and the magnet can be located. Then with the location of the actual cache determined.

When the time comes to recover the cache, middle of the night, blowing rain, trying to snow, with five guys and two mean dogs after you, recover the broomstick, dig up the trowel, scoop the thin layer of surface dirt free of the sheet plastic, scoop out the easy to move sand off the top of the cache bucket, down to where it is sitting in the bottom bucket. If enough room was left when the buckets were nested, the cache bucket should pull out of the bottom bucket easily. If there is too much space sand will have worked down and locked the two together. If not enough space is left, the compression of the bottom bucket will make it more difficult to get the cache bucket out. But it is not that hard to hit the right medium.

Pull the bucket and if you have time, try to fill in the hole best you can, hoping it will not be discovered until too late so the pursuers do not know you recovered anything, or if it is obvious you did, not what it was in the cache.

Now, if you have plenty of time, and conditions are not too bad, you can fairly easily recover the bottom, empty bucket, if you want. By having the hole a good shovel width around the bucket, filled with that dry, loose sand, it can be scooped out enough to pull out the empty bucket for future use. The main reason to use it is to make it easy to recover the cache bucket.

Another option, rather than just a brick or 2x4, or something to hold up the cache bucket, you can stash some additional supplies in it to do the same thing. If the cache is found, chances are the people will not dig out the bucket, not realizing how easy it is. Just get down to the lid and pull it off to get what is inside, leaving the remains of the bucket on top of the things in the bottom bucket.

You can carry that one step further, since getting the second bucket out is not all that hard, and have some double bagged and wrapped items below the bottom bucket. Even if the cache bucket is found and pulled out, and anything in the bottom bucket, it would take someone as devious as me to keep digging to pull out that bottom bucket to see if there was anything else underneath.

An option, if it is going to be difficult to not be observed by chance, is if the site is at all suitable as a campsite, set up a fairly large tipi or other tent with no floor over the cache spot. You can do all the work without anyone seeing what you are doing. Just leave the surface of the ground in the same condition as it was when you set up the tipi and no one should be any the wiser. Carry out the excess dirt in the same buckets in which you brought the sand.


The basics of caching drums are very similar to those for bucket caches. But there are some differences. Here are some things specific to the drum caches (This refers to open top drums with sealable lids, not drums for liquids with bungs.):

First, 55-gallon drums are big and heavy. Think about using 30-gallon drums if you can find them.

Second, if you are planning to just dig down to the top of the drums, remove the tops, and recover the items, I would think about that twice. The drums will be a valuable asset in and of themselves in the PAW. Also, by recovering the drums and repacking the contents (if you have to unload them to recover), it will be much easier to move everything by simply rolling the barrel rather than moving all the individual components or containers.

To facilitate this, I would have rope sling bridles tied up, using rope impervious to the type of ground you have, that you can put under and around the drums. This will allow the easy use of a pickup truck hoist, or tripod to lower and then lift the drums from the hole.

Now, a shovel width all the way around a bucket is adequate. You will need somewhat more to be able to dig all the way around the drum and get deep enough to recover it. Either that, or you will need to make a scoop device specifically to get the sand from around the drum without having to get down into the hole with it, with would be the preferred method for me.

Now, to anchor the drums from floating/vibrating out of the ground, I would use a dead-man type anchor. If you use the method I describe below, you will have plenty of room to put down a circle of sheet goods such as plywood, scrap sheet metal, or even a built up sheet made from a double layer (crossed) of one by twos or whatever. Whatever you use will need to be round, as large as the hole, minus just a little to make it easy to get down there.

And similar to the sling bridle for the drums, put down two ropes, crossed in the middle of the hole, before you put down the dead-man. Install the drum on the center of the dead-man, place a pair of crossed two by twos on top of the drum and tie off the ropes to them. This way, for the barrel to come out of the ground, and it is likely due to the slick surface, not only the weight of the drum, but the entire weight and mass of the backfill will also have to come up, which is highly unlikely because of the additional weight and the friction of the sand against the sides of the hole.

Some things you might not want to cache. Anything you really cannot afford to lose, for sure. Cache can be and are found from time to time by accident. Things that could get you in trouble if found should not be cached in open areas. Neither should anything that can be used against you. Such as guns or certain documents. Some of those things can be cached, but the locations must be where they would be extremely unlikely to be found.

As to protecting firearms and other important metallic objects, if you chose to risk caching them, I would grease them up, and then slip them into silicon impregnated sleeves before putting them into Mylar or plastic sealed bag, with either an O2 absorbent or desiccant pack.

A few words about alternative locations. Caches do not necessarily have to be buried in the ground. Using the proper containers, properly sealed, caches can be anchored under the water in ponds or lakes. I would not try it in rivers, as they can be washed away quite easily.

Caches around the home, on the property are a good idea. Just so you can have some equipment and supplies in case you home is damaged or destroyed and you cannot retrieve things immediately. They still need to be secure and hidden, but as you can generally control access to the property, perhaps quite as secure or hidden as off-property caches. (Some good places for home caches: under the sandbox, along the fence row, under the birdbath, the middle of the garden. The possibilities are endless.)

Caches can be placed next to steep hills or bluffs and material brought down around them. In rocky terrain, you can build a cairn to hide a cache. If there are some structures around that are not frequently used, caches can be secreted in, under, around, or on them.

That can include trees. Especially in swampy areas or areas prone to floods that are likely to have all sorts of junk lying around, or caught up in trees and abandoned structures. Unless you are careless and do not make it look like it has been there since the last flood, that old ice cream bucket stuck up in the tree, filled with filth would not bring any attention to it. And could have a zip-lock bag with some necessities hidden in that filth.

Which brings me to the point that not all caches need be bucket sized or bigger. You might just need to have a few things available. A gallon zip-lock, or even a quart one might hold just what you need. They can be secreted in some very small places that would escape notice unless someone was doing a very detailed search for some reason.

And the opposite is true. You might need to cache quite a bit of stuff. If you do, do not make one large cache. Spread smaller caches out within an area. You do not want to lose everything at once.

Here are some specific and general alternatives to buried and open caches in wilderness areas. These are more for urban areas when burial is not a very good option in some cases.

Depending on the actual types of construction in the area, from type of roads, sanitary drains and storm drains, housing construction, business construction, public works, play grounds, parks, and pretty much everything else, a person will probably be able to find several spots where a container can be placed that will either be well hidden, or blend in well enough to not draw any attention, unless the place is disturbed for some other reason.

Which that chance will be a major part of the location selection process. For instance, if the roof of your building is a flat roof, and there are several plumbing stacks on it, or air conditioning units and/or ducts, or antenna poles, or drains for rain water, or gutters and downspouts, or fire escapes, or roof access hatches, or... on and on and on.

Look around carefully, but with an out of the box and pushing the envelope mindset. You do not have to use PVC pipe. Work okay for a dummy plumbing vent if it matches the others, and has internal plugs (with the top one recessed a few inches so at just a glance it will look like an open pipe), and there are not any people that actively use the roof, or can see it. If a maintenance person is up there regularly, he/she would spot a new fake plumbing vent. But not necessarily something inside and around a corner of an air conditioning unit. Or some bracing on antenna poles, or an extra down spout in an area not looked at often, or a piece of gutter somewhere that does not necessarily have to have one, and with a screen over it to keep out leaves, could hide a few things.

If there is anywhere close that has a sandbox, such as a park, the building playground (I would stay off school grounds), large planter boxes, or pretty much anything else that has much sand in it, you can possibly volunteer to help refurbish, fix, or even simply install one, so you can make sure the sand is really deep, and you can plant a cash there, also deep, so playing children, or gardeners will not dig down anywhere near enough to hit it.

If there are storm drains that are too small to enter, but have road side or street side grates, covers, or openings, you can rig a container that you can push back down the line, on a stand of some type to keep it up out of the water (so it does not get carried down, as it should be waterproof to the point it can stay under the water for days), with a way to hook it and pull it out when needed.

Many things can be done if you volunteer, such as the sand boxes or planters mentions. If you help repair public works such as other things in parks, or common areas of housing units, there is a good chance you can install caches during the process of doing the work, when no one else is around, or you cannot be seen. Again, buried, or added to above ground structures and things like light poles, cross over supports, sign posts, the bases for those poles, etc.

If you are helping build a storage shed for the property, or the park, or for a neighbor, or for anyone close, work in some reinforcing beams vertically and/or horizontally. One or more can have a hollow where you can stash some things. Even a short section of decorative beam made of foam that can be matched to real beams in an out of the way, non structural spot, so a couple of hammer blows will break it open and you can retrieve your cache.

You can even do some of the things at your own place, even in an apartment. Build some fancy, free standing shelves, and trim them out with hollow beams. Hidden compartments. Display cases with hidden compartments or under shelf hiding spots that are hidden by a shelf front piece that projects down a couple or three inches.

Curtain valences that are hollow, or have space on top hidden by a raised front.

There are hundreds of ways to hide things. Sometimes in plain sight. Do you know anyone in high school taking metal shop? Maybe have them make a couple of aluminum castings of old pirate flintlocks, with hollow backs. Hide a gun in a gun kind of thing.

Those are just some of the possibilities. Looking over an area with caches in mind will reveal many more specific to the location.

A word on using decoy caches:
If you suspect that people know you are a prepper, and have any inclination that you might be using caches, you might want to use some decoy or dummy caches to divert them from looking for and finding your serious caches. Unless the person(s) are experienced preppers themselves, or have caching experience, including geo-caching, they are unlikely to be very skilled at finding them. But in a situation where they might be desperate enough to force you to tell them where your caches are, or simply are willing to put in a great deal of effort to find them without letting you know, people might just be seriously looking for them.

As with many other prepper situations, having some decoy, dummy, and sacrificial caches can be just one more tool to protect your supplies. And, possibly, your safety, if you are detained and force is used to try to get information from you.

Either way, if you can install some caches that you will not mind being found and losing in some instances, it might just be enough to get the people from looking further, or using greater force to get you to give up some of your real caches.

Decoy and dummy caches usually do not have to be nearly as well placed, concealed, or as much work done to emplace them. While you might not want them to be completely obvious, making them fairly easy to find without it being clear that you want them found (most people think everyone else is a lot dumber than they themselves are, and will usually believe their vastly superior intellect allowed them to find something you thought you had hidden so well), if they are decoy or dummies, with no actual cache there in the case of dummies, or one set up to be useless to them in the case of decoy caches, and you are not around for them to take vengeance upon, it might discourage them. Again, the mindset that you are not smart enough to actually have real caches when you used a decoy to try and fool them might come into play and cause them to quit wasting resources and time to look for more.

Decoy caches can also be used to simply take the heat off, if they have some items in them, but not of a type that can be used against you, or will provide the person with much in the way of help or more than very short term sustenance, again convincing the person that you do not have anything that will actually be of great value to them, as they were hoping.

The other situation is to have a cache a bit better positioned and ostensibly concealed, but that you can give up or they can find, that has the appearance of having been accessed and everything, or everything of importance taken already. If forced to give up the location, if you have it set up so it is believable that someone else simply found it, and you were unaware of that fact, they are less likely to take retribution for having been sent to a useless cache.

There is a risk that these actions will create a situation where you are at more risk due to their anger, but I believe the advantages of using decoy, dummy, and sacrificial caches will be worth the slight risk.

I am not going to get into full structure caches, such as buried tanks and such. They are a different subject in my opinion, with their own special procedures.

A note on sealing PVC pipe caches: While everything in the tube should be itself in water proof/water resistant packaging, the PVC does need to be sealed, too. The main options have been the regular solvent weld caps (‘glue on’ caps, which is a misnomer as it is actually a solvent weld), or a female adapter with a screw in plug well sealed with silicone or a water proof grease.

For the few PVC pipe caches I have helped set up recently I am now recommending using the appropriate sized cast iron, stainless steel banded rubber cap. The quality ones seal very well to PVC, and the stainless steel band and screw clamps hold up well in most places. To improve the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel (and even the rubber, as some things in the soil can cause rubber to deteriorate) is to coat the whole cap with a layer of silicone. (Or with hot gun glue if assembly is done where one can be used.)

Using the screw clamp stainless steel banded rubber caps makes it much easier to quickly access the contents of a PVC pipe cache. Scrape away any coating, if used, and use you pocket screwdriver (or better yet, your pocket socket driver) to loosen the screw clamps and band, and then work the rubber cap off the pipe.

As I mentioned, the rubber does seal very well to the PVC, so it does take a bit of effort to remove it. But not nearly as much as it does to cut the pipe if a solvent weld cap has been used, nor the effort to unscrew a well sealed screw plug in an adapter, which usually takes a fairly bulky tool (strap wrench) to hold the pipe, and large slip joint pliers to grip the plug nut to unscrew it. Easier with two people, and alternatives for the regular tools can be used, but all things considered, I believe the rubber caps for cast iron pipe is a better alternative.

Just my opinion

List of some types of caches:
01) Base camp cache: provides the materials and supplies to set up a base camp
02) Bulk trade goods cache: holds larger quantities of trade goods
03) Financial cache: financial and monetary assets
04) Food preservation cache: the items needed to preserve foods short and long term
05) Fuel/Automotive trade goods cache: trade goods relating to transportation
06) Packaged trade goods cache: small pre-packaged or home packaged trade goods
07) Reequip cache: items to replace those lost, damaged, seized, etc.
08) Resupply cache: fairly comprehensive cache of consumables
09) Simple supply cache: basic human needs cache for short term needs
10) Tradesman’s tools cache: items to set up shop for various activities
11) Travel route cache: materials to keep a vehicle going, as well as the humans
12) Arms and ammunition cache: pretty self-explanatory
13) Small to large multipurpose caches: group of caches with a wide variety of items
14) Retreat cache: items needed to set up a retreat and/or equipment/supplies for one
15) GOOD cache: items needed to leave an area and get one somewhere else
16) Mission(s) cache: caches of items needed to carry out various critical missions
17) Role camouflage cache: items to change appearance for a variety of situations
18) Short term stash cache: usually expedient to hide things temporarily
19) Intermediate term stash cache: same as above, but for later recovery
20) MT cache: prepared, but empty caches for use as needed
21) Decoy cache: cache(s) that can be found either with sacrificial items or that appear to have been emptied and poorly rehidden

Just my opinion.
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Old 01-19-2018, 11:32 PM
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If you don't want to set off a metal detector with something as large as a cache, then the top needs to be at least 18 in deep. Most metal detectors won't go deeper than a foot at most but I cant think of that go that deep.

Of course utility locate equipment will still find it.
I had an idea about preventing detection. After filling in the hole, carry or roll a few large rocks or boulders over the top, the bigger the better. That would make it more difficult to get the metal detectors close enough.
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Old 01-19-2018, 11:46 PM
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I would include:
Several five pound containers of salt, for meat preservation and making jerky
Some containers for food and water storage
Sewing kit and assorted glues and epoxies for fixing gear
All good ideas.
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At least one really good external frame backpack, for retrieving game
Great idea. I have two of those so I can afford to bury one of them.
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Solar panels and an eReader with lots of reading material on it, for those long dark winter nights - works well to illuminate your shelter, too, though you might want to be careful not to light your tent up if you're trying to hide LOLOL.
I suggest an 8” tablet instead. I have a Samsung Galaxy E 8”. It is a LOT more versatile than a reader. It has everything that a smart phone has except the ability to make phone calls. It has a removable MicroSD card, which can be up to 128GB. I currently have 239 Survival Manuals, Books, and Papers on it and on my Smart Phone, as well as on a couple extra MicroSD cards. I also have 2 solar chargers. I also have several thousand songs on them, several thousand photos, and lots more. I could also put many hundreds of books on it and still have plenty of room for more.
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Flashlight, solar battery charger for the flashlight batteries.
Emergency radio, and headphones. You'll want to know what's going on in the outside world.
Definitely
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Air rifle and pellets -- quieter and more accurate than the revolver for taking small game.
Good idea, but don't want to get carried away. Trying to keep the cost down.
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Old 01-20-2018, 12:36 AM
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My suggestion for the revolver is the Heritage Rough Rider. It is extremely well made and is available for $150 to $200 new. It is available as a single action, 6 shot revolver with a 6 ½ inch barrel. It has a .22 long rifle cylinder, and a .22 Magnum cylinder. It even has a safety beside the hammer.
An advantage of the .22LR is the wide range of ammo.
High velocity (1235 - 1640fps 40gr, 1850fps 21gr)
Standard velocity (1070fps 40gr)
Sub Sonic (970 - 1050fps 40gr)
Quiet (75% quieter than standard velocity)(710fps 40gr, 710fps 29gr)
Very quiet (uses only the primer to fire the round) (Aguila Colibri 420fps or 590fps 20gr)
Shotshell (31gr #12 shot 1000fps)

For the .22 WMR (Magnum) the Hornady V-Max (Polymer point, 2200fps 30gr) is a potent little cartridge that is great for hunting small to medium game and can be used for self defense.

http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/201...r-22-revolver/
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:23 AM
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Have a second, nesting, bucket for each cache bucket you have made up. Find something to put in the empty bucket that will support the cache bucket just shy of being a glove fit when inserted into the empty bucket.
Good idea. Makes it a lot easier to get out of the ground.

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Now this is where I do things rather different than most. Move any surface material away carefully before digging. When you dig the hole, make it two good shovel widths larger all around than the diameter of the bucket, especially if you want to recover everything.
Load up the extra buckets/boxes used to bring out the sand with the rest of the dirt and haul it off so there is nothing left indicating a hole was dug. Carefully camouflage the area, replacing any surface materials you moved before digging.
Before digging, spread a large tarp or plastic sheet on the ground nearby. Put all of the dirt you dig out on that tarp so that there will be no trace of the digging left when you are done.
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Old 01-20-2018, 02:16 PM
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One more item to put into the cache.
Plenty of Vitamin R (Rum)
Others might prefer Vitamin W, Vitamin V, Vitamin T, Vitamin S,Vitamin G, or whatever your favorite Vitamin is.
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Old 01-20-2018, 03:09 PM
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Yehudi, I would have sworn I had stated to put down something on which to put the dirt dug up. As many times as I have read and worked on that article, I never noticed the lack. Because that is what I always did.

Thank you for pointing it out. I will edit my article to include some things on reducing visible impact at the cache sight.

Just my opinion.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:10 PM
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Yehudi, I would have sworn I had stated to put down something on which to put the dirt dug up. As many times as I have read and worked on that article, I never noticed the lack. Because that is what I always did.

Thank you for pointing it out. I will edit my article to include some things on reducing visible impact at the cache sight.

Just my opinion.

Timing can help hide it as well . If you time it just right as they fall or days before all the leaves begin to fall. In just a few days your burial site will be covered by leaves just by waiting until fall to do it. Once there is a new layer of leaves covering the forest floor no1 will ever know no matter how well you cleaned up the sight or failed to clean it up all will be covered up NATURALLY in a few days time

A great time to do it in the fall is just before a storm or a windy day (20-30 mph gusts). The fowl weather will make a lot of the leaves fall.
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Old 01-20-2018, 09:52 PM
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I can tell you for a fact that even a cheaper detector would pick up a metal barrel at 4 ft deep. I detect quite a bit and have found needle sized objects at 18 inches. Iron and steel sound off at I credibly deep in the ground. Putting a large boulder would be best.

Ammo cans and larger metal will sound off like you wouldn't believe. Most people looking for gold will probably bypass the signal and keep going. People like myself will dig it up just to clean up the trash. It makes finding smaller and deeper gold easier.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:21 PM
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My biggest problem over the last sixty some years of caching supplies has been bears. Lots of bears here near zero humans here.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:30 PM
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:41 PM
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I can tell you for a fact that even a cheaper detector would pick up a metal barrel at 4 ft deep. I detect quite a bit and have found needle sized objects at 18 inches. Iron and steel sound off at I credibly deep in the ground.
That wouldn't not be the case around here. There is so much magnetite in this area you would spend all your time digging useless holes.
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