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Old 03-13-2017, 08:50 AM
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Default Bug out location recon pack



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Let's put together a daypack with the specific focus on prepping.

Least amount of gear as possible, with a focus on being self-sufficient.

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Old 03-13-2017, 03:11 PM
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Thanks for the vid. Kev.
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Old 03-13-2017, 03:48 PM
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No cordage??? How are you going to make a hooch out of the poncho with some way of tying it up??? A small piece of thin wood to wind 50-100' of mason string would be very beneficial. Possibly even add in a GI canteen stove to have a fire in for heating water for COFFEE.

Very good vid for the unexpected "Guest" during SHTF.
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Old 03-14-2017, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by fishingjeff View Post
No cordage??? How are you going to make a hooch out of the poncho with some way of tying it up??? A small piece of thin wood to wind 50-100' of mason string would be very beneficial. Possibly even add in a GI canteen stove to have a fire in for heating water for COFFEE.

Very good vid for the unexpected "Guest" during SHTF.
The cord segment did not make it into the finished video?

Guess I will have to make a video about cord.
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Old 03-15-2017, 06:01 AM
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Simple and spot on Kev; thanks for taking the time. I know you have this as a small BOL recon pack, but I think it applies for a variety of activities where you have your main pack for longer distances but may need to setup a camp and then do a little scouting, foraging, travel a short distance for water resupply, etc.

There are multiple options such as "piggy-backing" a smaller lumbar or shoulder bag or even something as extremely compact and lightweight as Sea-to-Summit's 20L Ultra-Sil daypack that weighs only 2.4 oz.

I combined both from a recent trip just to test them out; and they came in handy. The local lake was at an extremely low level and the daypack really helped as it was over a 1/4 mile from my campsite to an area to collect and filter water and then haul it back to my camp. Sure, I could have used my main pack, but this was just a good example of how a smaller "patrol" pack or setup allow a much lighter but still capable load for shorter forays, scouting, etc.

Here was a scouting setup I included with my main pack but could be used independently after my main camp was established. Lumbar pack is an older Maxpedition Devildog, Sea-to-Summit 20L daypack and my Hill People Gear Kit Bag:











Minimalist contents. Enough to sustain me for a day or three if needed. A good way to test out such a kit after you setup your main camp is to pack up this recon/patrol kit and move a short distance away. Setup your minimalist camp for the night and test everything out. If it gets too cold, you still have your main shelter and sleeping bag as safety net and revaluate your patrol kit and shelter/insulation options.

The only recommendations I would make Kev is a simple boo-boo/FAK kit and possibly a bandana or two.

ROCK6
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Old 03-15-2017, 08:12 PM
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This is my actual overnight local patrol pack setup for Home or BOL. Designed for up to 3 days/2 nights in temperate (non-winter) cool weather...

1200 cu in/19 cu liter Grey Ghost Multicam Assault Pack with 2 x side attached Condor Multicam H20 Pouches, & front attached ballistic nylon misc. (food) pouch, ballistic eye wear case, & Condor Multicam Tear-Away IFAK:

2 x 1 liter Nalgene Bottle with MicroPur Tabs in each pouch
1 x nested GSI Steel Nalgene Cup,
Dry-Sack 13L
USGI weapons cleaning kit configured for AR & pistol
Cut down green stadium seat foam butt pad
Multicam lightweight Goretex parka
Multicam lightweight Goretex rain pants
Primaloft puffy jacket (ECWS Level 7 Coyote Brown)
External ballistic eye wear case with day sunglasses & night clear goggles
Goretex gaiters
1 x pair Oregon Research Gortex insulated Gloves (Coyote Tan)
1 x coyote fleece hat
2 pair wool hiking socks
100% natural silk mid-weight long sleeved top (Forest Green)
100% natural silk mid-weight bottoms (Forest Green)
Condor Multicam Tear Away IFAK w/ standard Military/EMT contents
Snivel Med Kit in plastic travel soap dish
SOL Escape Bivvy (OD green) & USGI poncho liner

~4 lb external detachable nylon food pouch (mounted above IFAK on rear of pack):

3 x MH FD Chicken & Rice 2-serving entrees (2520 calories/~20 oz. total)
1 x Mainstay Lifeboat Ration (3600 calories/16 oz)
6 x MRE peanut butter packs & rolled tortillas (~2000 calories/16 oz total)
1 x plastic waterproof match container tube with salt
1 x 1 oz. airline plastic travel bottle of hot sauce
1 x 3 oz. airline plastic travel bottle of instant coffee
1 x plastic Spork
Esbit tabs x 12 (14 gram tablets; no stove; 6 ounces)
BIC lighter x 2

No tarp (although I could add my Multicam one along with some bungis/550 cord). Worn layers & bivy for sleeping or bad weather survival. About 20+ lbs. Survivable down to first frost temps (>28F) at night. Or snow flurries & rain. BTDT.

Everything else in clothing pockets, on chest rig, on belt line, or in hand. Including mini binos, PVS-14, HSGI Blow-Out Kit pouch, arms/ammo, radio, LED headlamp, tactical handheld light, compasses, map, 1 liter water, SRK knife, etc.
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Old 03-16-2017, 01:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astronomy View Post
This is my actual overnight local patrol pack setup for Home or BOL. Designed for up to 3 days/2 nights in temperate (non-winter) cool weather...

No tarp (although I could add my Multicam one along with some bungis/550 cord). Worn layers & bivy for sleeping or bad weather survival. About 20+ lbs. Survivable down to first frost temps (>28F) at night. Or snow flurries & rain. BTDT.
Maybe I'm actually just getting old, but I've found a small Sil-nylon tarp is my preferred shelter. Lower temps are rare (like below freezing), but rain is more common. I've found it very easy to just throw up my tarp, put out a small (Klymit) 3/4 sleeping pad and either snooze, brew up a warm drink or just simply wait out the storm. For bugging home, I include a bivy bag as they are far more efficient in colder temps or worse weather.

But you're spot on that layered clothing is really your first line defense against the environmental conditions.

ROCK6
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Old 03-16-2017, 04:49 PM
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Yeah, I can optionally add a camo tarp kit to the outside of the pack (or place in a buttpack), but 19 liters is just not much volume... and the thing is already stuffed. Adding other things like sleeping pad, sleeping bag, or overhead shelter exceeds the capacity (and intent) of this little pack.

My mission for this thing is local security patrolling and shift manning of observation posts/checkpoints during troubled times. And doing it in marginal rainy weather. It's not really a hiking load for back country trail use. Local security work only. The only reason for the food is if a planned shift or local patrol gets unavoidably extended. It provides a minimalist bivouac capability in case the weather dumps or I have opportunity to safely rack.

I envision this thing for a stealthy armed local environment where I'm either moving on short radius of operations (0-3 miles out; just beyond the wire), or surveilling from fixed observation points. No real camp establishment except in case of dire weather emergency. R&S Team activities. Travel light, freeze at night and all that. Except that I'm ensuring that I'd not actually have to freeze at night. Something I've done too often over the years. Most of the worn layers are just the normal stuff I carried on military foot patrols during fall or spring weather. Things I've worn on all day/all night surveillance missions while laying or sitting in driving rain. No erected shelter back then either.

For doing long distance trail miles or performing the same security gig in winter, I'd utilize one of my larger packs. And bring shelter & sleeping system.

(Edit to Add: The other purposeful point of this load is that it's all just sustainment items and ditchable in a fight. No ammo or other critical fighting items are in the pack. The IFAK is tear away and has a small sling if I have time to grab. Otherwise, optics, ammo, navigation items, signals, weapons, blow-out kit, and water are already carried on my body. The pack & its contents are expendable in-extremis. It's also deliberately light enough to run with for some distance... so hopefully I won't have to drop it.)
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Old 03-17-2017, 05:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astronomy View Post
My mission for this thing is local security patrolling and shift manning of observation posts/checkpoints during troubled times. And doing it in marginal rainy weather. It's not really a hiking load for back country trail use. Local security work only. The only reason for the food is if a planned shift or local patrol gets unavoidably extended. It provides a minimalist bivouac capability in case the weather dumps or I have opportunity to safely rack.
Mission definition is critical but I'm sure your setup is flexible enough to cover several different mission types. For backpacking, to keep weight down, I already use the chest-mounted Hill People Gear Kit Bag which houses my CCW and a few essentials. That diminutive Sea-to-Summit daypack is nice to expand and use for shorter trips (mostly to get water), but could carry a light tarp, insulation layers and a soft canteen and filter.

For short-range patrols, I have a dedicated battle belt, but that Maxpedition Devildog (which they should bring back!), is a great modern version of the old "buttpack". Recon-pack concept aside, I do agree that your fighting (or E&E) kit should be on your person and ready to engage or break-contact at a moments notice with enough to get you out of the AO, back to your main pack or patrol base.

ROCK6
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Old 03-17-2017, 06:50 AM
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I initially read the title as "Cook out location" for some reason.
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:44 PM
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Just a suggestion but as I have been going to auctions these past 4 years and have bought a lot of tents. Some of the tents are torn/burned/melted/bad zippers, etc. I cut the floors out of the bad tents and use the rain flies as very light weight tarps. And they come in a lot of sizes. Tent floors are darn good tarps complete with eyelets.
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Old 03-22-2017, 08:47 PM
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No food or snack items? Just asking.
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Old 03-23-2017, 05:42 AM
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No food or snack items? Just asking.
I would recommend it. A few Clif or other energy bars, some hard candies and maybe a little trail-mix are good insurance to just keep your mind working properly and off that growing in your stomach. In colder weather, they add much needed calories for thermoregulation. Are they a necessity for a 72-hour kit? Likely not, but they can provide and advantageous edge to keep the focused on the problem or task at hand.

I've noticed on distance hikes that when I'm tired, exhausted and my blood sugar drops, I'll get distracted and less attentive to my foot placement and that's when accidents happen. I don't know if it's physiological or psychological, but I find value of having some type of quality snack(s) in any day, patrol or backpack kit.

ROCK6
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Old 03-23-2017, 11:21 AM
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Perhaps I'm missing it, but what about bug netting (head net) and Deet.
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Old 03-23-2017, 11:51 AM
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Good catch.

That is what I carry today in the top flap of my BOB ALICE ruck. And what I carried for decades in the field. Today I live in a high altitude place where biting bugs are less of a concern. But you can survive a storm of all-night swamp mosquitoes if you have a head net & DEET (as well as long pants, long sleeve shirt, and gloves). BTDT.

The military style head net with the flexible halo-band is the heat. Keeps the net off of your face and ears and defeats the little blood suckers from biting through. While also still allowing for a little bit of ventilation across sweaty skin. Feather weight and packs away easily into a top flap, radio pocket, or rucksack lid. Low cost as well. ~$12. Been using this style everywhere in the world (without issue or complaint) since the 1970's.



High Concentration Deet Army Bug Juice is harder to find these days, so I just grab whatever commercial stuff has the highest concentration. Usually Deep Woods Off. DEET has worked for me in the jungles and swamps of Panama & Florida as well as biting fly/mosquito season in Alaska.
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Old 03-23-2017, 12:07 PM
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http://www.treehugger.com/lawn-garde...e-as-deet.html

CDC confirms lemon eucalyptus oil as effective as DEET

Long story short:
30% concentration mixed with water- GTG for 6+ hours... I can PERSONALLY confirm this.

https://www.amazon.com/Lemon-Eucalyp...Eucalyptus+oil

Essential Oils Do not expire. This lil bugger will last a LONG time.
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Old 03-24-2017, 01:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Hick Industries View Post
Perhaps I'm missing it, but what about bug netting (head net) and Deet.
Both of these are pretty important in just about every location (season dependent for some). I always have a Sea-to-Summit headnet and I've moved to picaridin insect repellent as it's less corrosive than DEET. I still have an use DEET, but only when it's a serious swarm and the picaridin just doesn't cut it (which hasn't happened yet!).

When I mention my FAK, I automatically include skin protection which consists of lip balm, sunscreen, bug juice and bug netting.

ROCK6
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