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Old 01-04-2017, 12:34 PM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
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Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post
Ha! This describes most hunters I've known. Physical fitness is certainly not on their list of priorities.
Refer to them as "Casual Hunters" then. I hike miles every day in the snow with a backpack and a heavy AR-10 with a bunch of ammo and other gear. I drag dead animals (sometimes plural) back the same way I came in. Usually about a mile hike to get to the spots that I like to hunt on public land. The easy-access parts are over hunted. The deep parts are where the wildlife is at. I'm 21 and I'm a head-turner at the beach when the snow melts
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Big_John View Post
I grew up in a hunting family and a community that is very active with hunting and I don't know a single one that has slept in a tent for more than a day or two.

Matter of fact, until I started enduro adventure motorcycle riding, I had not stayed in a tent much. Now my buddies and I pack up 450cc sized, street legal dirt bikes and we explore the western states, as remote as we possible can. 7 day rides, with 6 nights in a 2-person tent, with all the amenities that a backpack would hold.....has taught me some things.

I learned survival skills on motorcycle rides, far more than any part of my 40 years of hunting.
I race enduro as well and I learned a lot through doing so. Motorcycles keep you in good shape too!

But what kind of hunting did you do? "Hunting" is an enormous category. Did you have a specialty? I learn a lot through hunting. It compliments what I learn through enduro, but I mostly race harescrambles and motocross.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:39 PM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
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Originally Posted by frankthedog View Post
Who else spends more time at risk of a true wilderness survival scenario? Are hunters inherently the best wilderness survivalists?
You might want to clarify what sort of hunter you're asking about. At least make some discernment between casual once-per-year deer hunters, and hard-core bobcat hunters.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:43 PM
ol ol is offline
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I guess I'm missing the point to this thread?.........LOL

What difference does it make if some one is a hunter ....of any kind,...or not?

So far I'm seeing a "bash hunters thread"?
So how about a "bash farmers thread"....or "bash Doctors thread" they aren't good survivors either?
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Old 01-04-2017, 01:50 PM
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Originally Posted by TacticalFarmer View Post
Refer to them as "Casual Hunters" then. I hike miles every day in the snow with a backpack and a heavy AR-10 with a bunch of ammo and other gear. I drag dead animals (sometimes plural) back the same way I came in. Usually about a mile hike to get to the spots that I like to hunt on public land. The easy-access parts are over hunted. The deep parts are where the wildlife is at. I'm 21 and I'm a head-turner at the beach when the snow melts
Since most hunters fall under the category of fat, out of shape and don't stray far from a motorized vehicle, can't we just classify you guys that actually get out and work for it differently? "Real hunters", "backcountry hunters", "non-fatass hunters"?

It really is too easy to bash on hunters when 90% of them give the remaining 10% a bad name. I'm blown away at some of the guys I know that travel DEEP in to places like central Idaho and pack out insanely heavy amounts of meat. Big thumbs up to guys like that who work for it and are true outdoorsmen.
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:19 PM
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Honestly I've never met a fat hunter, now that I think about it.
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:36 PM
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You can believe this or not. I grew up on an isolated farm (yes here in the UK) and learned to hunt before I went to school. When I did go to school, I didn’t know how to ‘play’ with the other kids in the playground at break times, I’d only really been around adults and I would stand in the corner of the playground alone not knowing how to join in. With some assistance that was rectified but that’s another story.

Living isolated we were natural preppers without knowing it. Always had big stocks of food and I can remember as a child being snowed in on the ‘Moors’ for 6 weeks before we could eventually get out to civilisation. 6 weeks, no problem, we could have gone for 6 months.
Out of school I’d hunt with bow and arrow, spear or whatever, when I could handle my first gun a single barrelled 410; that fuelled my love and passion for guns plus the added fact that my Father had a ‘big collection of guns’. We hunted for the table.

I left school and became a Gamekeeper and after some time I left that profession and spent the next 7 years living off the land. Besides odd jobbing, farm work, gardening fencing, timber felling and logging etc. on many occasion my real passion was to go “walkabout” and hunt.
I would say to the wife when you wake in the morning I’ll be gone and expect me when I return.
I would be off in the dark with what I could carry, basic survival gear, limited food, snares, guns adequate clothing etc. By dark I would hike many miles to reach the hills and forests before daylight where I would hunt and live. I lived off wild edibles and hunted meat, spit roasted over a log fire, on occasions I would carry a small pan and small bottle of oil for cooking.

The purpose was to make a living and money by hunting. For instance 5 fox pelts or 5 Roe deer could make me a good week’s wage. 1 big Fallow or Red deer could bring a lot more than a week’s wage. My best was 5 Roe in one day. I might be gone for 4 maybe 7 days at a time. I would only leave to sell the quarry I had hunted. Rabbits, squirrels, crows whatever. Yes even vermin had a price, such would go to Taxidermists and I provided many specimens that still grace museums today. I hunted, trapped etc. absolutely everything. I also hunted and trapped to order.
All this was many years ago and I am still a hunter. Old age has slowed me down (a bit) but the passion is still there and I still have camp outs in the hills and I can still live off the land.

In recent years I have hunted in Texas a few times and if any of you out there have met me, my friends over there gave me the nickname of - “Deadly”, cos’ if I pick up a gun that’s what I am.

So anyway sorry for the long post, I know of very few ‘hunters over here that could handle wilderness survival, I could say I know of one farmer and a couple of Gamekeeper friends who could make it in a long term scenario.
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:49 PM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
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Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post
Since most hunters fall under the category of fat, out of shape and don't stray far from a motorized vehicle, can't we just classify you guys that actually get out and work for it differently? "Real hunters", "backcountry hunters", "non-fatass hunters"?

It really is too easy to bash on hunters when 95% of them give the remaining 5% a bad name. I'm blown away at some of the guys I know that travel DEEP in to places like central Idaho and pack out insanely heavy amounts of meat. Big thumbs up to guys like that who work for it and are true outdoorsmen.
The majority of hunters that I know do not fit the description that you provide. You are probably referring to the guys that wear grubby cigarrette-scented camo to the bar and have big boisterous voices that TALK about hunting a lot. Hell, they might even have permission to hunt on their sister-in-law's husband's dad's land that they refer to as theirs. But they don't go out and scout and any game that they kill is out of mere luck. Usually an omnivore or a bird (possibly raised in captivity and released for the hunt) that can hardly fly.

You don't see many real hunters in daily life unless you are in their circle. Know why? Because we're in the backcountry on a daily basis. Real hunters are on a slightly different wavelength when they make it part of their lifestyle. That makes it less likely for standard yuppies to come in contact with them. The "hunters" that you see in the city or bars regularly are wannabes. Thats why they're not in the woods or sleeping early so that they can get up at 5am and hunt the sunrise.
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Illinois Crackpot 66 View Post
Honestly I've never met a fat hunter, now that I think about it.

That reminded me of a sign I saw in a shop window a couple of weeks ago, it read,

“Vegetarian – Ancient English word - for bad hunter”.
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:39 PM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
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Describing hunters as being " fat, out of shape and don't stray far from a motorized vehicle"
is like classifying motorcycle racers as "fat, bearded, old guys in leather, who make a point to show everybody their loud V-Twin motorcycles"

When in reality, you never actually have seen a motorcycle racer, because they don't hang out in your realm, because your realm is probably only interesting to lame weaklings (and they laugh at the poser street-biker shenanigans when they're in their own circles).
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Old 01-04-2017, 04:06 PM
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Originally Posted by TacticalFarmer View Post
Describing hunters as being " fat, out of shape and don't stray far from a motorized vehicle"
is like classifying motorcycle racers as "fat, bearded, old guys in leather, who make a point to show everybody their loud V-Twin motorcycles"

When in reality, you never actually have seen a motorcycle racer, because they don't hang out in your realm, because your realm is probably only interesting to lame weaklings (and they laugh at the poser street-biker shenanigans when they're in their own circles).
Whoa, I sense I've offended someone. As I mentioned, I know several hard-core hunters that cover serious ground, brave the elements, and are worthy of a lot of admiration both from a skills and physical standpoint.

Don't take offense. I work in I.T. and if someone said "90% of I.T. guys are out of shape, weak, wimpy beta males" I wouldn't take offense, I'd just laugh and agree. Are there outdoorsy, in shape, skilled in areas other than computers, alpha type I.T. guys out there? Sure, but most fit the prior description pretty accurately.

I suspect that since "hunters" is such a broad term and covers so many different geographical areas and different demographics that it's more nebulous than anything as a general term, which is why the OP's question was humorous to many of us.
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post

I suspect that since "hunters" is such a broad term and covers so many different geographical areas and different demographics that it's more nebulous than anything as a general term, which is why the OP's question was humorous to many of us.
I agree...it's a broad stereotype, but is likely more dependent on region than anything else. The hunters and trappers I knew growing up in the PNW are vastly different than the local hunters I know here in GA. There are a few (mostly the bow hunters) who are pretty good outdoorsmen (and women); however, many are just camo-clad, overweight and don't necessarily have the skills to survive much beyond the confines of their truck or deer blind/stand. Heck, most I've hunted with make sure they can drive their truck or ATV right up to the kill so they don't have to drag it the 100 feet to a firebreak or access road.

Most of the hunters I hunt with and know are older and do have excellent outdoors skills, but their physical conditioning limits them to hunting pretty controlled areas where they don't have to exert themselves very much...which I can understand.

Hunter just no longer means "skilled outdoorsman", but that stereotype doesn't apply to all hunters either.

ROCK6
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Old 01-05-2017, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by evilwhitey View Post

Don't take offense. I work in I.T. and if someone said "90% of I.T. guys are out of shape, weak, wimpy beta males" I wouldn't take offense, I'd just laugh and agree. Are there outdoorsy, in shape, skilled in areas other than computers, alpha type I.T. guys out there? Sure, but most fit the prior description pretty accurately.

.
Its kind of like seeing some mouth-breather attempt to write a macro in Excel, then categorize him the same class as everybody between him and a CCAr, and then making inferences about the capabilities of "programmers".

And I'm not taking offense. I'm just over tired from freezing my nuts off until midnight last night. It was approx. -20 degrees f here last night! I still managed to call in a coyote and shoot it. I think it was luck that made me hit it. I could hardly see anything and I couldn't shine it with my light, because it was too close (it would get spooked). I took a shot at a silhouette with crosshairs that I couldn't see on a piece of land that nobody had probably been to in a few decades.
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Old 01-06-2017, 11:38 PM
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navigational skills are most important in survival as they reduce your time spent outdoors where you are most vulnerable.


i think sailors also have good survival skills
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Old 01-07-2017, 04:59 AM
LuniticFringeInc LuniticFringeInc is offline
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Many would and could do well, but if you look at the typical person that goes hunting these days they would be in a serious hurt locker by the time 72 hours had elapesed! Your Modern Day hunter typically will have the best camo, calls and scent attractants and the latest technology in fire arms but most have little more than that on them if they get in a jam. Even if they had more few know how to make the most of it.
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Old 01-07-2017, 08:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TacticalFarmer View Post
Its kind of like seeing some mouth-breather attempt to write a macro in Excel, then categorize him the same class as everybody between him and a CCAr, and then making inferences about the capabilities of "programmers".

And I'm not taking offense. I'm just over tired from freezing my nuts off until midnight last night. It was approx. -20 degrees f here last night! I still managed to call in a coyote and shoot it. I think it was luck that made me hit it. I could hardly see anything and I couldn't shine it with my light, because it was too close (it would get spooked). I took a shot at a silhouette with crosshairs that I couldn't see on a piece of land that nobody had probably been to in a few decades.
Sounds like a successful hunt, I have an acquaintance that use dogs to hunt coyotes, farmers pay him to kill them off, he carries a gun but usually doesn't have to use it. In Illinois you can hunt coyote all year,but only 24 hours a day 3 months out of the year.
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Old 01-09-2017, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by LuniticFringeInc View Post
Many would and could do well, but if you look at the typical person that goes hunting these days they would be in a serious hurt locker by the time 72 hours had elapesed! Your Modern Day hunter typically will have the best camo, calls and scent attractants and the latest technology in fire arms but most have little more than that on them if they get in a jam. Even if they had more few know how to make the most of it.
72 hours with a standard hunting loadout would be hard to do, especially if you're alone. My hunting bag looks a lot like my bugout bag, except with fewer things in it. I still have a knife, basic med kit, multitool, lighters, paracord for dragging animals out, and I'm always dressed for the occasion. My snow camo poncho actually doubles as a shelter if you have rope with you!

The hard part would be fire, and even that is easy when you have a bunch of ammunition with gunpowder inside. Great firestarter if you can get a spark into it I even have dry toilet paper in there lol.
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Old 01-09-2017, 04:10 PM
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Its all relative, would I do well right away in the Montana mountains,,?? NO -- I will not fool myself.. would a mountain man make it easily in the swamps of the south?? maybe..?? a true hardcore hunter will make better survivalist than 90~% of the rest of them...Yes!..
Again, its relative to your specific location.. South Mississippi vs. North West Colorado.. ..Fla. vs. Vermont. etc.. etc..
...Just be prepared!!
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Old 01-09-2017, 08:55 PM
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Made the mistake of trying to hunt on public land for the first time last time. I'm prone and have a deer about 50 yards yards out and im looking to see what is beyond the deer and a shot lands 3 feet away from me. I said eff it walked back to my car and decided I'm not meant to be a hunter. I figured i could be a hunter or a survivor but not both at that time.
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Old 01-09-2017, 09:36 PM
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I am a hunter, fisher, and all around hillbilly, i am pretty confident i could make it in a survival situation, i understand what that might mean, had a discussion with my woman about it recently how i hope we never have to go there
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