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Old 12-12-2016, 11:12 AM
swamppapa swamppapa is offline
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Actually my greatest concerns are 1) ambulating *******s posing as human beings and 2) feral animals / the animals associated with ambulating *******s.
I figure a "wild " animal can tell by smell I would not be sufficiently tasty to be worth all the trouble.

Last edited by swamppapa; 12-12-2016 at 11:13 AM.. Reason: Damn auto correct
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:17 AM
TacticalFarmer TacticalFarmer is offline
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Not exactly in the wild, but I've been attacked by some junkyard dogs when I was 17. 2 of them. I was authorized to be on the property that I was at, but the dogs didn't know that! Rottweiler mixed with German Shephards.

Everybody thinks they're a tough guy until you get two of those dogs trying to kill you. I was pretty much defenseless. Even if I had a gun on me, I would've had to be very skilled to identify the threat and then react in time. Absolutely caught me off guard. I heard nothing except the dogs' nails clicking across blacktop and then less than 1 second later one barreled into me at about 20mph before I even got a good look at it.

These dogs were full psycho and full steam kill mode. Luckily, the owner heard them and got them off of me within 20 seconds (feels like an eternity). If I were alone, I would've been really screwed.
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:32 AM
DadeMurphy DadeMurphy is offline
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Just a few times:

** Sprayed two bears in the past 23 years.
** Hiking on the AT, had one encounter with a couple of hikers harassing a lone hiker.
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Old 12-12-2016, 02:32 PM
SeriousSurvival SeriousSurvival is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry D Young View Post
Yep. Several times. Only had to kill a couple of them. Snakes, raccoons, one rabid opossum, feral dogs a few times, feral hogs and a couple true Razorbacks, one cougar, one bear, one elk, one alligator, several black widow spiders, a whole colony of brown recluse spiders at one time, and upwards of 10 billion mosquitos.

Just my opinion.
Wow Jerry!

Darn Nature, you scary!
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Revmgt View Post
Had to run for my life from the projects in Newark NJ one night, does that count?
That's funny because it happened to me too. Upon graduating HS, I went to Essex County College & then Rutgers Newark. The closest bus stop was about two blocks away and my classes were at night. Unpleasant commute for sure. I like to come off like a tough guy here so it hurts to say that some running did happen.
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Old 12-12-2016, 06:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmcd View Post
Many years ago I went on a 3 day camping trip with (at that time) my girlfriend and she forgot to mention that it was that time of the month. I swear I was lucky to come out of that with all body parts attached 8-)
When I went to Philmont Scout Ranch in 2010, this was actually a part of the orientation. We were told that the science was not certain, but that it was entirely possible that mountain lions would stalk women on their cycle. Our ranger was real cute little girl out of Utah. She never said anything and we didn't ask, but it did cross my mind that it could be an issue.

I have since heard that isn't true. But I don't know.
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Old 12-12-2016, 07:05 PM
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Hunting wild pigs in Texas with two friends. At noon took break and built small fire heated up some food. One person went away from fire to relieve himself and began screaming, didn't take gun with him. Several medium size feral dogs attack him, was knock to ground and bitten several times arm and legs. I shot killed two , third person killed one hit two more, the rest ran into brush. My friend had to get stiches and shots.
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Old 12-12-2016, 08:19 PM
texagonian01 texagonian01 is offline
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Several close calls from poisonous snakes, alligators, feral hogs. Had few bears uncomfortably close in Kodiak Alaska. And a jealous boyfriend shot at me in my younger wilder days. Happy to live and tell about it.
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Old 12-13-2016, 12:27 AM
robertmawson robertmawson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maintenanceguy View Post
I've chased black bears out of my camp several times. They're generally dosile and run from confrontation. I had one rear up on it's hind legs to show me he was bigger than me. I sort of fake charged him and he backed down and ran away. It's good that he did. I didn't have a plan B.
Sometimes it's best to concentrate on plan A.
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Old 12-16-2016, 12:46 PM
souldier66 souldier66 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankylus View Post
When I went to Philmont Scout Ranch in 2010, this was actually a part of the orientation. We were told that the science was not certain, but that it was entirely possible that mountain lions would stalk women on their cycle. Our ranger was real cute little girl out of Utah. She never said anything and we didn't ask, but it did cross my mind that it could be an issue.

I have since heard that isn't true. But I don't know.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=tfboOt1bJcA
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Old 12-17-2016, 12:04 AM
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I was almost attacked by a Dalmatian once. My wife and i were hiking when the dog came running straight at me snarling...thankfully I had a big stick in my hand that i'd picked up earlier in our walk. I didn't really have time to think about it, just swung it like a baseball bat and hit the dog on the side of the head. He ran away and we kept walking. Could've been alot worse.
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Old 12-17-2016, 02:49 AM
BabyBlue BabyBlue is offline
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We once arrived at our favorite off-road camping site to find a tremendous sized bull sunning himself exactly in the best spot to park a pop up. City-boy husband honked the horn to get it to move. Instead, it calmly stood up, turned around in a seemingly civilized manner to face the truck, then tucked his head and rammed the grill hard enough to skew the truck sideways. (So thankful for capped horns.)

He then proceeded to wander off down the valley bellowing for his ladies. City-boy learned sleeping dogs be damned, let sleeping 1 ton bulls lay.
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Old 12-17-2016, 05:35 AM
Revmgt Revmgt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILL View Post
That's funny because it happened to me too. Upon graduating HS, I went to Essex County College & then Rutgers Newark. The closest bus stop was about two blocks away and my classes were at night. Unpleasant commute for sure. I like to come off like a tough guy here so it hurts to say that some running did happen.
Kenny Rogers said, You got to know when to hold em, know when to fold em. Know when to walk away, know when to run.

I know a lot of tough guys and I haven't met one yet who never had to "exit, stage left..."
Any one critical has never experienced the Badlands of Newark after dark
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Old 12-17-2016, 10:15 AM
ppine ppine is offline
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Working with bovines is always interesting but usually not life threatening. When driving bulls horse back it helps to be able to side pass, move your horse sideways. Horns in the ribs are the move you want to avoid. It is usually possible to use the free end of a lass rope or a whip to make bulls respect your horse.

Once in awhile you come up on a bull standing in front of a gate when driving a truck. I usually throw some rocks and cowpies at them to get them to move.

Sometimes a cow with a young calf will come after you if you are on the ground. You better be athletic or you are going to get run over.

We have bred them to be docile, but sometimes they can have plenty of attitude. Your body language is very important with livestock. Make them believe you are big, confident and fearless and they are likely to leave you alone.
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Old 12-17-2016, 11:55 AM
bilmac bilmac is offline
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I was going down a cow path through DENSE riparian vegetation on the lower Colorado River. I came to the junction of two trails and maybe 50 yards up the crossing trail a young bull was laying. He got up immediately and started a charge. The vegetation was dense salt ceder and reed, there was no room to get away. I had a 10-22 in my hands and started putting rounds into his head. I had fired maybe 5-7 rounds, he was almost on top of me and I ducked back into the trail I had been walking on, but I saw his feet go out from under him at the same time. I emptied the rest of the mag into his head and his eyes were still rolling around when I quit.

Later I went back to try to find the skull, what a trophy that would have been, but I couldn't find it.
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Old 12-17-2016, 04:38 PM
augoldminer augoldminer is offline
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I chocked out a pitbull once till it was dead for trying to kill my cats.

The owner let it run at night and it killed livestock around the neighborhood.
I called animal control to pick up the body and return it to its owner.

The animal control officer was glad to do it AND give the owner a ticket for allowing a dangerous animal run lose.
The owner was not pleased but under calif law you can kill any dog that is trespassing on your farm.


I hunted dog packs and yote packs for ranchers and farm owners.
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Old 12-17-2016, 05:55 PM
greif greif is offline
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Yes, ended up with hundreds of bite marks, those darn mosquitoes
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Old 12-17-2016, 07:32 PM
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Nope. Not even close.
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Old 12-18-2016, 10:38 AM
ljcygnet ljcygnet is offline
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The local range cattle here deal with a large population of lions and bears, and I suspect that makes for a rather cranky population. Anything that can survive the lions & bears has attitude, and passes it on. I've learned to be really careful on foot around the cattle. Usually a few rocks get 'em moving, but I've been charged. Confidence and some loud four letter words help.

Mama cows out rank me if I'm on foot. I'll go around. LOLOL. I'm not a cowgirl, I just live here, so if I can avoid crossing paths with the cattle I do. They're bigger than I am.

I'll never forget the time I was out riding a quad and came across a family camping in the woods. The dad was holding his little daughter up to feed and pet the "cow" that had wandered into their camp.

I stopped and said, "That's a bull, and I wouldn't do that if I were you."

If it was just an adult petting the cow, I wouldn't have said anything, but he was holding a diaper sized kid up.

He said, "They wouldn't turn dangerous cows loose out here, and it's a cow. Look, it's got udders." In a tone indicating I'm the stupid one.

I was like ... those aren't his udders. And the Darwin Award definitely applies if you manage to get your offspring eliminated from the gene pool too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ppine View Post
Working with bovines is always interesting but usually not life threatening. When driving bulls horse back it helps to be able to side pass, move your horse sideways. Horns in the ribs are the move you want to avoid. It is usually possible to use the free end of a lass rope or a whip to make bulls respect your horse.

Once in awhile you come up on a bull standing in front of a gate when driving a truck. I usually throw some rocks and cowpies at them to get them to move.

Sometimes a cow with a young calf will come after you if you are on the ground. You better be athletic or you are going to get run over.

We have bred them to be docile, but sometimes they can have plenty of attitude. Your body language is very important with livestock. Make them believe you are big, confident and fearless and they are likely to leave you alone.
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Old 12-18-2016, 10:48 AM
ppine ppine is offline
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Hi ljcygnet.
I have spent a lot of time on the Rim in No AZ, and we can agree that the cattle there tend toward being wild. They don't see people all summer and herding them is like herding deer sometimes. We used to leave the horns on the cows and bulls to decrease lion predation. People with livestock experience have many fewer problems than laymen. It amazes how so many people think all bovines are cows.
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