70 days in Alaska, no food... - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Alaska old timer seeks food buying advice pale horse Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 8 03-12-2013 07:05 PM
$225. for 8 days of MH food worth it justincasesfo Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 41 01-23-2013 06:12 PM
over 30 days food storage illegal onihawk1 Controversial News and Alternative Politics 63 09-17-2012 01:53 AM
Remote Alaska to stockpile food, just in case. Fasha Political News and Discussion 6 08-30-2012 12:14 PM
Alaska Stockpiling Food scittlz General Discussion 4 08-30-2012 12:42 AM
On a 40 mile hike over 4 days what food would you bring Moirlend Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 88 01-29-2012 06:04 AM
7 days of food makes you a terrorist? ForestBeekeeper General Discussion 70 11-30-2011 11:52 AM
Bear minimum food to keep you going for 3 days? Flex Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 91 03-18-2011 08:23 PM
6 days food preparation qwertyjjj Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 11 08-11-2010 06:20 PM
Couple lives(food) on $1 per day for 30 days meisje Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 16 12-14-2008 05:43 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-10-2014, 12:12 PM
Any Mouse's Avatar
Any Mouse Any Mouse is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Midwest
Posts: 396
Thanks: 1,144
Thanked 627 Times in 244 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Quote:
Originally Posted by ninjasurvivor View Post
In actuality, they dropped you off in the wilderness with food all around you.
There has to be one in every bunch..

Could you pull something like this off?
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Any Mouse For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 12:24 PM
ninjasurvivor's Avatar
ninjasurvivor ninjasurvivor is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Cali
Posts: 5,316
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5,453 Times in 2,662 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Any Mouse View Post
There has to be one in every bunch..

Could you pull something like this off?
Probably, I am an experienced hunter and survivalist after all. But that's not really what I was getting at based on my previous comment.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ninjasurvivor For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 12:34 PM
buck3m's Avatar
buck3m buck3m is offline
In the Taiga
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 174
Thanks: 78
Thanked 583 Times in 137 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ppine View Post
Buck,
You are a smokejumper. That explains a lot. One of my closest friends jumped out of Redmond, Or and later became a slurry bomber pilot.

Could you spend a little more time talking about the difficulty in foraging for plants as a food source? August is a great time to be looking for berries in Southeast. I worked on the Mainland east of Ketchikan and remember finding berries once in awhile. It takes a lot of work to really add calories to your diet from plants. The longer you are out there, the more important they become in providing nutrients. Even so they seem like an opportunistic way to add calories to the diet.
ppine, I'm curious to know which smokejumper you know. Perhaps you could message me with his name? It's a small world.

My first challenge for getting plants was, again, not knowing the ecosystem very well. For example I was stepping over several plant species early in the trip that I was eating weeks later. It was apparently not a big berry year, or it wasn't a particularly good berry area because they weren't as easy to find as I'd expected. There was a good variety of berry species, though, and I usually managed to find enough. Two plants that were available in abundance once I identified them were sea asparagus and goose tongue. I'm sure the native peoples would have known many more plants than I was collecting.

One of the big lessons I learned is that for wild foods it takes an enormous amount to replace the calories that we are accustomed to. I was eating about 3 lbs of fish/crab/deer meat a day, plus plants and berries, and still lost weight.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to buck3m For This Useful Post:
 
Old 12-10-2014, 01:27 PM
ninjasurvivor's Avatar
ninjasurvivor ninjasurvivor is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Cali
Posts: 5,316
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5,453 Times in 2,662 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by buck3m View Post
One of the big lessons I learned is that for wild foods it takes an enormous amount to replace the calories that we are accustomed to. I was eating about 3 lbs of fish/crab/deer meat a day, plus plants and berries, and still lost weight.
It's because starches and carbs are hard to find in the wild. Like where are you going to find grains? You won't. Virtually no sugar, and depending on your meat sources, little fat. Maybe you could get some cattail stalks if they are in season, or wild potatos, but aside from that there would be no flour or bread or any of the carbs and starches you are used to. And if you also are having a hard time finding fatty animals, then you are headed toward rabbit starvation.

That is why indigenous people are generally very skinny. Their natural diets are barely enough to sustain them long term.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to ninjasurvivor For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 03:42 PM
HorseSoldier HorseSoldier is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ANC AK
Posts: 3,137
Thanks: 3,190
Thanked 4,516 Times in 1,938 Posts
Default

Quote:
That is why indigenous people are generally very skinny. Their natural diets are barely enough to sustain them long term.
It's hard to become obese without agriculture and starch/sugar intakes not normally seen in a hunter/harvester environment -- but that's biochemistry, not inadequate calories or nutrition. Hunting and harvesting from the environment is an entirely viable long term survival strategy for human beings -- it is, after all, what we all did for most of human existence.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to HorseSoldier For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 07:03 PM
albertjohnson's Avatar
albertjohnson albertjohnson is offline
CabinBuilder/Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Yukon
Posts: 1,871
Thanks: 1,147
Thanked 3,891 Times in 915 Posts
Default

Another great adventure Buck! Good on you.

Everyone, Buck has a great video on another of his adventures...he rafted down some remote river up near the Brooks Range in northern Alaska and lived off the land, I think for about 50 days that time. He got and ate lots of caribou and moose Buck?
He's quite the modern day outdoorsman/survivalist. He's too modest to plug it so I will. . .

Get his video, it's really good! (called something like "700 miles rafting down...in Alaska." Oh wait, here it is: Amazon.com: Alaska Hunting Adventure: 700 Miles... cover
Amazon.com: Alaska Hunting Adventure: 700 Miles...
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to albertjohnson For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 08:40 PM
dude's Avatar
dude dude is offline
in the woods
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Colorado Mountains
Posts: 1,775
Thanks: 5,293
Thanked 2,797 Times in 1,175 Posts
Default

Amazing way to spend a summer Buck, great adventure! 5 star for sure, as BunkerBuster stated.

One question, what type of bear fence is pictured & how did you manage powering it for that length of time? (Asking due to never having looked at or used any security for camps).
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to dude For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 09:15 PM
buck3m's Avatar
buck3m buck3m is offline
In the Taiga
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 174
Thanks: 78
Thanked 583 Times in 137 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dude View Post
Amazing way to spend a summer Buck, great adventure! 5 star for sure, as BunkerBuster stated.

One question, what type of bear fence is pictured & how did you manage powering it for that length of time? (Asking due to never having looked at or used any security for camps).
I'd never used a bear fence before either. Here's a link to all of my gear. This was a UDAP brand fence. It was powered with 2 "D" batteries. Each set lasted nearly a month! I don't know that any bears actually touched it, but I know from the farm that even a big, mean old bull would steer clear of electric fences. I'm sure there are variables and they aren't 100%, but they certainly upped the odds that I'd come back to an intact camp if I was gone for a day or two.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to buck3m For This Useful Post:
Old 12-10-2014, 09:44 PM
toobboy's Avatar
toobboy toobboy is offline
Pencil 5, AUTOCAD 0
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3,657
Thanks: 13,098
Thanked 14,439 Times in 3,019 Posts
Default

Buck, we use bleach in small cups around the perimeter of camp to keep the Black Bears away.. I don't know if it would work on Grizzlies. Electric fences don't work here. Fantastic blog, by the way. I sure would like to see Alaska some day. One
quick question, though.. Are you allowed to use gill nets? Ninja, probably is not the same as DID...don't
go all gunks on us...
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to toobboy For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 12:39 AM
Rice_Cracker Rice_Cracker is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 21
Thanks: 26
Thanked 18 Times in 9 Posts
Default

Fantastic trip Buck! A true dream come true. I will be adding your blog to my favorites list for sure. Thanks for posting it.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Rice_Cracker For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 08:27 AM
buck3m's Avatar
buck3m buck3m is offline
In the Taiga
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 174
Thanks: 78
Thanked 583 Times in 137 Posts
Default

toobboy, I don't think there is any way I could legally have used gill-nets on this trip.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to buck3m For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 10:12 AM
vetryan15's Avatar
vetryan15 vetryan15 is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Back in dirty jerzey for awhile again
Age: 33
Posts: 441
Thanks: 478
Thanked 318 Times in 201 Posts
Default

That was a fantastic read. Thanks for that. Living my dream that's for sure. Going to keep a look out for more of your adventures .
Ryan
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to vetryan15 For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 11:29 AM
elliott264's Avatar
elliott264 elliott264 is offline
The pig...COMMANDS ME!!
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: eastern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,807
Thanks: 14,831
Thanked 9,780 Times in 3,095 Posts
Default

i really enjoyed the read. thanks for sharing. i noticed the word "legal" used frequently when harvesting food. "interesting" times we live in...*hangs head in shame*
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to elliott264 For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 12:54 PM
buck3m's Avatar
buck3m buck3m is offline
In the Taiga
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 174
Thanks: 78
Thanked 583 Times in 137 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott264 View Post
i really enjoyed the read. thanks for sharing. i noticed the word "legal" used frequently when harvesting food. "interesting" times we live in...*hangs head in shame*
Thanks!

Are you saying you disagree with laws regulating the harvesting of fish and game?
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to buck3m For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 01:02 PM
AKSurveyor AKSurveyor is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 185
Thanks: 71
Thanked 218 Times in 97 Posts
Default

Buck3m, I do stand corrected sir! The Dolly is not a trout, although erroneously called that at times, but is actually a char. Dang, 57 years and still learning new shiite!
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to AKSurveyor For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 01:02 PM
cleatis's Avatar
cleatis cleatis is offline
The end is,,,,,
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: southeast of nowhere
Posts: 9,722
Thanks: 9,887
Thanked 13,023 Times in 5,457 Posts
Default

One question must be ask. Why?
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to cleatis For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 01:06 PM
charliemeyer007's Avatar
charliemeyer007 charliemeyer007 is offline
reluctant sinner
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rent Free in your head
Posts: 13,059
Thanks: 33
Thanked 21,568 Times in 8,138 Posts
Default

I love the orange meat of a Dolly. They don't let us keep them anymore. I quit buying a fishing license for years over that.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to charliemeyer007 For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 01:14 PM
buck3m's Avatar
buck3m buck3m is offline
In the Taiga
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 174
Thanks: 78
Thanked 583 Times in 137 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cleatis View Post
One question must be ask. Why?
What are you asking "why" to?
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to buck3m For This Useful Post:
Old 12-11-2014, 03:08 PM
ppine ppine is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 10,726
Thanks: 8,298
Thanked 10,983 Times in 5,386 Posts
Default

The domestication of grains in Europe and the subsequent agriculture that followed allowed for production of flour and yeast bread. In the Americas it was the cultivation of beans and corn. Rapid population increases followed because even the poorest people could get enough to eat. Now, in a country that is becoming increasingly obese, we can look to processed carbohydrates and refined sugars as the cause.

The moral of the story is to eat more like Buck.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-11-2014, 03:16 PM
HorseSoldier HorseSoldier is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ANC AK
Posts: 3,137
Thanks: 3,190
Thanked 4,516 Times in 1,938 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott264 View Post
i really enjoyed the read. thanks for sharing. i noticed the word "legal" used frequently when harvesting food. "interesting" times we live in...*hangs head in shame*
Fish and Game violations in Alaska are a very big deal. The OP wasn't in an emergency survival situation, why would he break the law?
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to HorseSoldier For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
alaska, alaska survival, alone in the wilderness, foraging, gear list, living off the land, survival



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net