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Old 02-01-2012, 11:28 PM
SDL SDL is offline
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im looking for some advice and a recipe for making real salt pork.
the kind that they used to make in the 19th century, where it was packed in brine and salt and lasted a very long time
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:59 AM
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We can salt meat. The proper term is called 'corning',

There are many recipes. We have some old cookbooks from the 1800s, that my wife uses. All recipes for corning use some ratio of: salt, bay leaves, cloves, peppercorns, garlic, allspice, brown sugar, and saltpeter.

This last time we did it, we had a long debate and did some googling to kind of merge different recipes.

'Table salt' / rock salt: Sodium Chloride works okay, but not as good as Nitrate salts. Problem is that nitrate salts are generally bad for you. Old recipes call for using Nitrate salts, and that corned meat lasts for many years. Our modern food industry has been shifting to using less and less Nitrates, because the FDA has regulated it's use. Which means that modern corned meats do not have the same shelf life. Also many modern corned meats today require refrigeration, simply because they are not honestly salted at all. They have only been flavored.

What we have settled on is a recipe where we reduced the nitrates by half, and we substituted in a selection of preservative herbs.

Here is the recipe we use. We mixed:
10 ounces of sugar;
2 1/2 ounces of sodium nitrate;
3 pounds of rock salt;
1/4 cup parsley;
1/4 cup sage;
1/4 cup rosemary;
1/4 cup thyme;
3 teaspoons of pepper;
1 teaspoon of ground cloves;
6 bay leaves;
4 garlic cloves.
Then add water to make 6-gallons of brine. Heat and stir enough to get it all dissolved, and drop in the meat.



When processing meat you can use various methods for preserving that meat.

We: freeze, salt/corn, dry [either by jerking, smoking, or pemmican], pickle, canning, and freeze-dry. None of these have to require electricity.
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Old 02-02-2012, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
We can salt meat. The proper term is called 'corning',

There are many recipes. We have some old cookbooks from the 1800s, that my wife uses. All recipes for corning use some ratio of: salt, bay leaves, cloves, peppercorns, garlic, allspice, brown sugar, and saltpeter.

This last time we did it, we had a long debate and did some googling to kind of merge different recipes.

'Table salt' / rock salt: Sodium Chloride works okay, but not as good as Nitrate salts. Problem is that nitrate salts are generally bad for you. Old recipes call for using Nitrate salts, and that corned meat lasts for many years. Our modern food industry has been shifting to using less and less Nitrates, because the FDA has regulated it's use. Which means that modern corned meats do not have the same shelf life. Also many modern corned meats today require refrigeration, simply because they are not honestly salted at all. They have only been flavored.

What we have settled on is a recipe where we reduced the nitrates by half, and we substituted in a selection of preservative herbs.

Here is the recipe we use. We mixed:
10 ounces of sugar;
2 1/2 ounces of sodium nitrate;
3 pounds of rock salt;
1/4 cup parsley;
1/4 cup sage;
1/4 cup rosemary;
1/4 cup thyme;
3 teaspoons of pepper;
1 teaspoon of ground cloves;
6 bay leaves;
4 garlic cloves.
Then add water to make 6-gallons of brine. Heat and stir enough to get it all dissolved, and drop in the meat.



When processing meat you can use various methods for preserving that meat.

We: freeze, salt/corn, dry [either by jerking, smoking, or pemmican], pickle, canning, and freeze-dry. None of these have to require electricity.
im interested in freeze drying but i dont know much about it. do you know if potassium nitrate is useable? im interested also in using pure salt to salt the pork, what cuts of meat work well?
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Old 02-02-2012, 10:57 AM
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basically the idea is to pack pork or other meat into 5 gal foodgrade buckets and seal. im looking for something that will keep for several years, i like the recipe you have. for short term use i would like to use just salt. for sealing up in buckets should i use more salt? and ive also been looking and I have found that water softener salt as long as its not the rust remover or potassium kind is nearly pure salt, and its quite cheap.
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Old 02-02-2012, 11:12 AM
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At Jas Townsend, they talk about salt pork from the 1700s (pre canning). It's part of a series about 18th century cooking that I find interesting.


My dad, who grew up on a farm in the 30s, just used salt and not brine. Not sure why, I'll ask him next time we visit.
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Old 02-02-2012, 11:31 AM
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... potassium nitrate is useable?
Yes, most recipes call for it.

My mother used it in her corning, and we have used it in the past.



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... im interested also in using pure salt to salt the pork, what cuts of meat work well?
I do not know what 'pure salt' is.

If you mean table salt / rock salt [sodium chloride], then yes it kind of works, but it does not provide the shelf like that nitrate salts provide. Which is why many modern corned meats required refrigeration, because they have removed the nitrates.

Corning works equally on all meats.
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Old 02-02-2012, 11:38 AM
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... My dad, who grew up on a farm in the 30s, just used salt and not brine. Not sure why, I'll ask him next time we visit.
There are threads on this forum that talk about dry-rub methods.

They do work.

However the end result commonly has more waste. You have to remove the outer layer first when you go to eat any of it.

If you are preserving meat for a couple months it works fine.

Whether you rub dry salt into meat, or whether you choose to put the salt into water and soak the meat, it all works.



With the water solution your allowed to mix other things into the solution. They can each add more preservative qualities. Anti-bacterial, Anti-pesticide, Anti-fungal. With these other specific qualities, the recipes allow you to back off on how much salt your using.

Parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme, pepper, clove, bay leaf, garlic; each add specific qualities that can allow you to use less salt.
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Old 02-02-2012, 02:44 PM
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definetly going to give it a try. im thinking packing this stuff in 5 gal food grade buckets will work well, if i can minimize the airspace add the salt and spices you are talking about i think it will work well. i never thought about using rock salt but im guessing back in the old days thats what they used. have you salted beef as well? my idea is to be able to seal this stuff up much like canned, preserved in salt and potassium nitrate, spices, and have it last as long as it would in a tin can.
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Old 02-02-2012, 06:48 PM
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... have you salted beef as well?
Corned beef? Yes.

My mother did corned beef a lot when I was a child. Later when my wife and I were first learning about self-sufficiency, we did corned beef a few times.

We no longer do beef, because cattle do not fit on our land. We have wet forest. Which is better suited to goats, sheep, hogs and poultry, but not cattle.



Quote:
... my idea is to be able to seal this stuff up much like canned, preserved in salt and potassium nitrate, spices, and have it last as long as it would in a tin can.
Yes. We have 5-gallon buckets with meats in brine, sealed in our basement. No doubt that meat will be good for decades.



An important feature for you, when your looking at a recipe. Is to research why each ingredient is included. Many published recipes have ingredients that are for flavor and not for preservation.

Thing is later when you pull that meat out, how will you prepare it for the table? If your adding an ingredient for flavor; it effects what you can do with the meat years later when your ready to eat it.
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:35 PM
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I would question the wisdom of placing meat of any sort, no matter how it is processed, into a 5 gallon bucket and storing it long term at room temprature.
Sodium nitrate helps preserve the meat and it's color but is not a miracle cure. It can be bought, pre-mixed, under the name "Insta Cure #1". Follow the instructions which comes with precisely.
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Old 02-02-2012, 09:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texazz View Post
I would question the wisdom of placing meat of any sort, no matter how it is processed, into a 5 gallon bucket and storing it long term at room temprature.
Sodium nitrate helps preserve the meat and it's color but is not a miracle cure. It can be bought, pre-mixed, under the name "Insta Cure #1". Follow the instructions which comes with precisely.
it wont be exposed to high temperatures, just kept in a basement where the average temp is 55 deg. and its not intended to be eaten uncooked, still going to cook it, like in beans, ect. ive looked it up and in the old days the stuff was kept in barrels that didnt exactly seal, they took it on ocean voyages where it kept for months. im planning on making everything sterile and oxygen free, just like canning.
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