How many cattle on 3 acres? - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Farming, Gardening & Homesteading Country lifestyle, homesteading, blacksmithing and living off the grid.

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Cattle Thread thyme2bprepped Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 937 03-18-2019 07:19 PM
After the cattle got sic dillin Books, Movies & Stories 636 02-12-2019 06:40 PM
Miniature Cattle anyone? mongoose Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 34 03-11-2017 01:22 PM
Any Cattle Ranchers out there? JoeInSTL Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 29 01-18-2017 09:48 PM
`Sea Otter vs Australian Cattle Dog` Athanasius Jokes, Humor & Music 0 10-08-2013 02:42 PM
Cattle Question Mominator Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 6 02-16-2013 05:22 PM
Investing in Cattle The Business Financial Forum 28 01-18-2012 05:09 PM
anyone raise cattle gunman4444 Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 16 10-10-2011 12:03 AM
Cattle HAILEGAR Hunting and Trapping General Discussion 14 03-21-2009 07:33 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-12-2017, 04:55 PM
America's Patriot America's Patriot is offline
This is a great survival forum
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,269
Thanks: 3,002
Thanked 30,182 Times in 9,940 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Being in East Texas, you could get 5 cows on that 3 acres. You get enough rainfall there. Now, the years you have a drought... be prepared to drop some dough on hay. You would be wise to befriend someone in the area that bales hay. They can tell you where to get the best prices and can provide you with lots of half bales they inevitably have at the end of any given day.
Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2017, 06:40 PM
John_Auberry's Avatar
John_Auberry John_Auberry is offline
Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 5,476
Thanks: 2,579
Thanked 10,302 Times in 3,355 Posts
Default

If divided right 1 head per acre. Need to have two graze fields and one cutting field.
Quick reply to this message
Old 01-13-2017, 09:12 AM
ppine ppine is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Northern Nevada
Posts: 10,726
Thanks: 8,298
Thanked 10,983 Times in 5,386 Posts
Default

After some more thought.

One with supplemental hay some times during the year.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2018, 06:05 PM
Jayhawker Jayhawker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: East Kansas
Posts: 37
Thanks: 17
Thanked 57 Times in 27 Posts
Default

I'm in Eastern KS, (the wet part of KS.) The simple answer to your question is that it all depends on what you are feeding them. You probably get grass growing year round in Eastern TX, but the heat may mean that it stops growing for several months out of the year or more. You may or may not have the means and equipment to irrigate your field, which if you could do that would likely increase your ability to have more animals on your land. You may or may not have the means to purchase lots of grain for your cows, which also is a factor in the equation. With a lot of grain you can grow cows stocked more than 3 to an acre pretty much anywhere. It isn't ecologically great, the vegetation would all get eaten away and you would be left with pretty much feedlot style conditions, but you could technically do it. In my area, I have green growing grass for about ten months out of the year on average. I don't have to irrigate that land because it rains enough for the pasture to grow well as long as the grass isn't dormant in the winter. I have 2 cows with eventual plans for three total on eight acres. I also have an excellent dense pasture that has already been grazed for over 50 years. I plan on grass feeding throughout the summer with no supplemental feed, so any more cows than that and I would end up with some hungry hungry cows that would eat up a lot of money in feed. As it is, I only have to buy hay for the winter. If you're going to be milking your cow she will need supplemental grain while she is being milked and it doesn't matter how much pasture she has. If you want her to be as healthy as possible it is best practice to feed her grain while she is milking, and this has been done for thousands of years. She will technically still produce without grain, but she will produce less than a gallon in many circumstances on just hay. Especially if you are trying to keep her calf on her to save money on milk replacer, you are going to want to invest in at least a pound or more of grain a day for her if you want her producing optimally. The price of a couple of pounds of grain is still far less than the price of the four or five gallons of milk you are likely to get from a good producing dairy cow with a calf. Recently weaned calves will also need a small amount of grain for the first couple months to ensure that they develop properly, think of it as an investment in a healthier and stronger adult cow. Without it they can end up with stunted milk production and stunted growth for life, much like a human child with malnutrition. So even on a really good pasture with more than enough hay you will need those inputs if you are doing it right that are sort of the built in cost of having a cow. Now add a whole bunch of supplemental hay and grain on top of that if your pasture isn't ideal or frequently dry, and you have an economic proposal that actually ends up being more expensive in terms of ongoing costs than just buying the beef. I would recommend talking to cattle farmers near you in your community and discussing this question with them. People who raise grass-fed cattle or who run specialty small dairies are typically very willing to discuss their process with you. They more than any of us keyboard warriors are going to be able to tell you what pasture in your part of the world is capable of doing. Then once you have some specific answers from them, as in, how much do they feed their cows in a year, can they get away with not feeding grain, how much grain do they feed per cow for how long, and how many head do they have on how many acres, you can run your own cost benefit analysis of the price of grain in your area, the price of hay, the total cost of production to bring a cow to slaughter weight (2 years minimum,) and the cost of the meat likely to be produced from whichever breed you're considering. If the cost of raising it yourself outweighs the cost of purchasing the beef, then the answer is that I wouldn't advise you to raise cows at all unless as pets. If the cost of raising the cow is less, then it's worth consideration. I can't imagine three acres of even the best quality pasture possible supporting more than a cow or 2 on just hay. Really the question is what level of investment is possible or realistic for you and what level of return are you trying to get? If you are just trying to produce some food for yourself and you don't mind working for it for the higher quality food you're likely to get, if you're interested mostly in the peace of mind of having the beef in your freezer and knowing where it came from, then breaking even economically might be worth it for you. If on the other hand you are mostly interested in it from an economic perspective and you just break even but also have to work a half hour a day for it, it might not make sense at all.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jayhawker For This Useful Post:
Old 12-28-2018, 06:32 PM
Jayhawker Jayhawker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: East Kansas
Posts: 37
Thanks: 17
Thanked 57 Times in 27 Posts
Default Some Ramblings About the Jerseys

I work with a small herd of Jerseys and have 2. They are indeed some exceptionally nasty bulls. It isn't really worth having one around unless you're in the business of selling jersey semen to most people with jerseys who AI because the bulls are so nasty. With grain during milking, a jersey can actually provide over 4 gallons of milk a day during peak milking, if you leave the calf on you're talking about more like two. If you are leaving the calf on and just feeding hay with no grain you are looking at less than a gallon a day. A Jersey may technically live for 15-20 years but they only produce milk for around ten or twelve max and that would be an extreme outlier, most have a functional milk producing lifespan of about 7-8 years when you consider that you need to grow her for a year before calving her anyway. They do eat less than angus cows but they also don't produce as much meat. I find the meat to be as good if not better than angus, but they do take longer to finish, and all grass fed cows will take longer to finish than grain fed. Maximum marbling and quality for Jersey cows is more like 2 years as opposed to the 1.5 years of the more commonly raised meat breeds, and even those breeds will marble better if you wait longer to slaughter them. They may technically be at max weight in a year and a half but it's the highest quality marbling that takes a little more time. If you're producing a lot of beef it makes sense to slaughter early to save money on feed but if you're going for the highest quality possible you want to wait a little longer.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jayhawker For This Useful Post:
Old 12-28-2018, 07:17 PM
RW_in_DC RW_in_DC is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Delusion Central, aka, Dreamland on the Potomac
Posts: 355
Thanks: 27,816
Thanked 428 Times in 214 Posts
Talking Keep the Trees, aka, Silvopasture

Given your property already has trees you’d like to keep, perhaps you could use silvopasture principles: https://www.fs.usda.gov/nac/practice...opasture.shtml.
Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2018, 04:21 AM
tnxdshooter's Avatar
tnxdshooter tnxdshooter is online now
Hiker
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Crossville, TN
Posts: 680
Thanks: 42
Thanked 361 Times in 201 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayhawker View Post
I'm in Eastern KS, (the wet part of KS.) The simple answer to your question is that it all depends on what you are feeding them. You probably get grass growing year round in Eastern TX, but the heat may mean that it stops growing for several months out of the year or more. You may or may not have the means and equipment to irrigate your field, which if you could do that would likely increase your ability to have more animals on your land. You may or may not have the means to purchase lots of grain for your cows, which also is a factor in the equation. With a lot of grain you can grow cows stocked more than 3 to an acre pretty much anywhere. It isn't ecologically great, the vegetation would all get eaten away and you would be left with pretty much feedlot style conditions, but you could technically do it. In my area, I have green growing grass for about ten months out of the year on average. I don't have to irrigate that land because it rains enough for the pasture to grow well as long as the grass isn't dormant in the winter. I have 2 cows with eventual plans for three total on eight acres. I also have an excellent dense pasture that has already been grazed for over 50 years. I plan on grass feeding throughout the summer with no supplemental feed, so any more cows than that and I would end up with some hungry hungry cows that would eat up a lot of money in feed. As it is, I only have to buy hay for the winter. If you're going to be milking your cow she will need supplemental grain while she is being milked and it doesn't matter how much pasture she has. If you want her to be as healthy as possible it is best practice to feed her grain while she is milking, and this has been done for thousands of years. She will technically still produce without grain, but she will produce less than a gallon in many circumstances on just hay. Especially if you are trying to keep her calf on her to save money on milk replacer, you are going to want to invest in at least a pound or more of grain a day for her if you want her producing optimally. The price of a couple of pounds of grain is still far less than the price of the four or five gallons of milk you are likely to get from a good producing dairy cow with a calf. Recently weaned calves will also need a small amount of grain for the first couple months to ensure that they develop properly, think of it as an investment in a healthier and stronger adult cow. Without it they can end up with stunted milk production and stunted growth for life, much like a human child with malnutrition. So even on a really good pasture with more than enough hay you will need those inputs if you are doing it right that are sort of the built in cost of having a cow. Now add a whole bunch of supplemental hay and grain on top of that if your pasture isn't ideal or frequently dry, and you have an economic proposal that actually ends up being more expensive in terms of ongoing costs than just buying the beef. I would recommend talking to cattle farmers near you in your community and discussing this question with them. People who raise grass-fed cattle or who run specialty small dairies are typically very willing to discuss their process with you. They more than any of us keyboard warriors are going to be able to tell you what pasture in your part of the world is capable of doing. Then once you have some specific answers from them, as in, how much do they feed their cows in a year, can they get away with not feeding grain, how much grain do they feed per cow for how long, and how many head do they have on how many acres, you can run your own cost benefit analysis of the price of grain in your area, the price of hay, the total cost of production to bring a cow to slaughter weight (2 years minimum,) and the cost of the meat likely to be produced from whichever breed you're considering. If the cost of raising it yourself outweighs the cost of purchasing the beef, then the answer is that I wouldn't advise you to raise cows at all unless as pets. If the cost of raising the cow is less, then it's worth consideration. I can't imagine three acres of even the best quality pasture possible supporting more than a cow or 2 on just hay. Really the question is what level of investment is possible or realistic for you and what level of return are you trying to get? If you are just trying to produce some food for yourself and you don't mind working for it for the higher quality food you're likely to get, if you're interested mostly in the peace of mind of having the beef in your freezer and knowing where it came from, then breaking even economically might be worth it for you. If on the other hand you are mostly interested in it from an economic perspective and you just break even but also have to work a half hour a day for it, it might not make sense at all.
Not sure about there but here the rule of thumb is one cow and calf per acre and a half.

Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to tnxdshooter For This Useful Post:
Old 12-29-2018, 08:07 AM
PowderDreams PowderDreams is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 13
Thanks: 0
Thanked 32 Times in 10 Posts
Default

Thread is dated prior to when I first visited, but I thought I would make a suggestion. You might want to look at rabbits if planning for your own subsistence. According to what I have read, rabbits have the highest conversion ratio (feed intake to body weight gain). Just ensure all involved are willing to consume rabbit when alternative meats are available. (Based on my personal family revolt.)
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to PowderDreams For This Useful Post:
Old 12-29-2018, 09:25 AM
RufusJ RufusJ is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 616
Thanks: 6,244
Thanked 1,605 Times in 465 Posts
Default

Maximum two steers, and pray you don't have a year like this year. Get to know a hay man really well because you will need to supplement whatever they get from your land. I'd do Longhorns because they forage better than other breeds. Make sure you've got water for them.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to RufusJ For This Useful Post:
Old 12-29-2018, 10:38 AM
TENNGRIZZ TENNGRIZZ is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: IN TRANSITION
Posts: 7,741
Thanks: 138,893
Thanked 21,286 Times in 5,940 Posts
Default

My suggestion would be raise 1 or 2 dairy x beef heifer bottle raise them so they will be tame and halter broke , when they come of age breed them to a Brangus type bull and when they calve go to a local dairy or the Sulpher Springs sale buy 3 dairy x beef cross bull calves lots of Dairy's breed their first calf heifers to angus bulls , dairy x beef cross cows can easily raise 4 calves , so your cow will be nursing 4 calves hers and 3 surrogates. I would cross fence at least dividing that area in half one will need a couple of small old stock/horse trailers to have a move able nursery /barn keep the cow seperated from the calves for the 1st couple of months tie her and feed her when you let her in while the calves are nursing. etc I could go into great detail , but most tame cows will adopt the calves easily enough. Or get about 10 goats and a billy cross fence and have 2 shelters and you are in business. JMHO and S/FI!
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-16-2019, 02:34 PM
Bigfoottracks's Avatar
Bigfoottracks Bigfoottracks is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Florida
Posts: 4
Thanks: 14
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
Would increasing the field to 3.67 acres help out very much?

I am working around certain factors on the land.

There are oak trees I do not want to cut down.
Yes, you could have 3.67 cows :D
You can increase the number of animals by increasing "biomass" per acre which is just a fancy way of saying "plant tall stuff"; forages like sorghum, millet, etc.
One problem with small acreage is that internal parasites tend to proliferate by completing their life cycles from cow to manure, to ground and back to the cow more efficiently because they don't have time to die before the eggs are re-ingested. Tall forages help to control that, along with pasture rotation.
Quick reply to this message
Old 10-17-2019, 11:22 PM
Fizbin's Avatar
Fizbin Fizbin is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 112
Thanks: 30
Thanked 124 Times in 62 Posts
Default

Lots of good advise here, but may I recommend with only that amount of acreage, sheep. We raise purebred Old English South Down, (Baby Doll). They basically are like small cows but much cuter. More manageable as they top out at about 100lbs. They are easy to breed, provide wool, meat, and easy to sell to backyard farmers and homesteaders.

Ladies pay big bucks to have these little things, check out the pictures and you'll agree.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...heep&FORM=IGRE

Lastly, goats or the diablo's of the ranch. They always escape the fence, they climb on your cars, they climb on the loader and turn the headlights on and burn the battery out, they girdle and kill trees and shrubs, they eat and climb up into live oak trees, they get in front of your car and wont let you pass, they poop all around your house, barn, workshop and more. The worst of all, they PEE ALL OVER THEIR OWN FACES!!! NASTY
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
cattle, cattle field, cattle per acre, fencing, livestock, livestock per acre, raising cattle



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net