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Old 01-12-2019, 09:09 PM
willc453 willc453 is offline
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Not sure if this entry should be here or maybe under hobbies? Would like to hear from those who have and use a 3D printer as it's been 2 years since anyone submitted a reply to this original thread.

Now some background info on me. Getting back into modeling, but going for 1/35th scale zombie/apocalypse dioramas. I've down loaded literally thousands of photos of different things such as mail boxes, street lights, abandoned trains, etc. Now originally, though I'd have to do a lot of scratch building just to make silicone molds for everything, but then happened to watch a Youtube video by Luke Towan (railroading buff) as he used the Anycubic Photon resin printer. Really shocked to see a 1/87th scale office chair he printed. Watched more videos about this printer and it's the one I'm buying this year, BUT...... Seems none of the videos explain how long the person has been using a 3D printer.

Would like to hear from anyone about the learning curve in using one of these. I don't mean setting it up, but actually printing things. How did the first few prints turn out for you? Found many websites with free programs to print basically EVERYTHING I'd want in a diorama....as in at least 300 of them. One question I still have, is how do you know or find out what size this item will be to begin with. Another is, can you reduce the size of the item? Last thing I need is a 1/24th scale mailbox for example.

Also trying (but failing) to use a basic cad program. At 65, it's kind of hard for this old dog to learn new tricks. Looking at designing truck beds for ALL of my 1/32 & 1/36 diecast pickup trucks whose beds are only 1 foot deep scale wise.

Thanks for any help and advice given.
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:21 AM
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Take a look at Form Labs Form 2, the intuitive, reliable stereolithography for the desktop at $3,350.

It can use multiple resin types include a type for investment casting.

Your local community college may teach a class on solidworks or inventor. While both of those programs will be too expensive for ongoing use, you can get a student edition during the class. What you learn can be transferred to one of the other cheaper consumer modeling programs.

If you are a vet, you can get solidworks for $20, but only for non-commercial use.

The printer is easy to use. The magic comes from what you can model. It is like using a paper printer. Once the paper is figured out and loaded, you just push a button, however, if you cannot read or write, you could only reprint copies of other authors work.

The more expensive printers are easier to use as more of the features are automated.
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:56 AM
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Hey wiilc,
You and your projects are perfect candidate for desktop printing. As 911 said, the cheaper the resin printer ($4k-$5K) the more hand-holding they need. Processes can get away from you, working one day and then getting screwy the next. Printers in the $10K range begin to get pretty bullet-proof. But I think the filament printers (~$800) might just work.

Re: CAD, there is indeed a steep learning curve. But, there is also a TON of help out there if you decide this is your new hobby. PM me if you want to go in that direction.

There are free CAD programs available, I know nothing about them. The basic NURBS-based CAD workhorse is Rhino 5.0 @ $815:
https://novedge.com/products/1042

Good luck!
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Old 01-13-2019, 08:59 AM
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I've seen a shop set up were you can use your files to print on their higher end machines, they also taught classes and were also for hire to design and produce. Thought it was a great way to get involved. I can't recall what city or state this was in.
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Old 02-01-2019, 12:39 PM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
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Computed Axial Lithography (CAL) might be the 'Holy Grail' of 3D printing: ...

'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Published on Jan 31, 2019
It looks like something you might find aboard the Starship Enterprise. A projector beams a three-dimensional video into a container of photosensitive resin. The video plays while the container rotates for a few minutes — then the fluid drains, leaving behind a complete, fully formed 3D object.

Though it seems like science fiction, it’s not, thanks to scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), who have developed a new high-speed 3D printing method called Computed Axial Lithography (CAL). The method is described online in the Jan. 31 edition of the journal Science.

“This is a breakthrough in the space of possible methods to do additive manufacturing,” said LLNL engineer Maxim Shusteff, a co-author on the paper. “What this approach does is make it possible for interesting polymer parts to be made much more quickly, which is often a bottleneck, and we can now think about using materials that don’t work well with slower layer-by-layer methods.”'
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:17 AM
willc453 willc453 is offline
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Want to thank everyone for their replies, but had shtf twice. Once last year in June 2018, then Jan. 16th of this year. Dad wanted me to move to Florida to live with him for his few remaining years. He was 91 and I said okay. 3 days for brother & friend to pack medium size U-Haul, 3.5 days getting to his place. Thing didn't work out as he "didn't want my bleep cluttering up his place. He wasn't used to it and wasn't going to have it". He said this on the 2nd day of my unloading the truck, then again on the 3rd. At which time I asked if he'd live me to leave and go back to Nevada. Told that was a good idea.

While unloading truck in Fla., hand got infected and got worse after coming home and unloading the truck. Ended up spending 5 days in hospital, infection was that bad. Things got unpacked and put away willy nilly. Anyway, haven't had any interest in modeling, but still looking at getting the Anycubic Proton 3D printer this year. Then Dad died Jan. 16th.

I know for a fact I'm buying that printer this year and WILL get back into modeling. Since coming back home, have found a lot of websites with free 3D programs for basically EVERYTHING I thought I'd have to scratch build, make a silicone mold of, then cast resin copies of. Not now. This includes finding a locomotive, boxcar and caboose in 1/32nd scale. Even found a bunch of civilian people that I hope to print and alter two ways: cuttin' 'em up so their legs/arms are like they're running instead of standing in some sort of formation. The other is finding out can I alter them to do this with the program provided. Also found 8 different zombies I can print out for $24, while the same resin ones on Ebay would cost me $100. I may buy some superhero programs as I'd like to have zombies attacking the cosplayers who at first think the zombies are fake.

Just need to get everything squared away, then start on the 3 dioramas I had started in late 2017: Childhood Lost, The Alley & The Fountain. No photos of The Alley as I had just started it. Have street, sidewalk, alleyway and was working on the building. Childhood lost has other things to be added to it. The figure (1/35th scale) gives you an idea of it's size.
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:15 AM
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Quote:
"Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Published on Jan 31, 2019
It looks like something you might find aboard the Starship Enterprise. A projector beams a three-dimensional video into a container of photosensitive resin. The video plays while the container rotates for a few minutes then the fluid drains, leaving behind a complete, fully formed 3D object.
Wonderful. I wonder how far they actually are with this process. Wish the animation was the real deal.
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Old 02-02-2019, 07:38 AM
Major Mjolnir Major Mjolnir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackpine1 View Post
Wonderful. I wonder how far they actually are with this process. Wish the animation was the real deal.
Yeah, I'd like to see an actual video. The full paper is here: http://science.sciencemag.org/conten...cience.aau7114

The pic is from that link of, apparently, actual 'printed' objects.
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