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Old 07-12-2020, 09:39 PM
t-all t-all is offline
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Default Is it too late to grow potatoes



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I live in zone 5b and my row potatoes were a flop this year. I think it was a combination of poor soil and heat. But I saw a web page that shows planting potatoes in a burlap sack and I was interested in this and want to try it. But I'm not sure if I waited too long because I know they need 100-120 days before harvest and by then we're getting towards the end of October and that's about the average time for our first frost. Any thoughts? Also I may have a hard time finding seeds too.
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Old 07-12-2020, 10:34 PM
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https://harvesttotable.com/how_to_gr...%20fall%20crop.

Plant potatoes no later than 12 weeks before the first expected autumn frost.

If you live where winters are mild and summers are hot, plant late season potatoes in winter for harvest in mid to late spring before the weather turns hot or plant early-season potatoes in late summer for a fall crop.


https://gardenerspath.com/plants/veg...ato-varieties/

Earlies need about 75-90 days underground, or sometimes even less time.


Here are some early varieties:

https://www.seedpotatoes.ca/early-season-varieties/



I gleaned the following list of early potato varieties from this site (which also has lots of good growing and harvesting tips): https://harvesttotable.com/how_to_grow_potatoes/

‘Caribe’: early season; drought tolerant; all-purpose use.
‘Butte’: early season; baking.
‘Red Norland’: early season; use boiled, steamed, mashed, or in salads.
‘Red Thumb’: early season fingerling; roasting.
‘Yukon Gold’: early season; use boiled, mashed, or in a salad.
‘Cranberry Red’: early- to midseason; use mashed, steamed, roasted, and in salads.
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Old 07-12-2020, 10:42 PM
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As long as you get them up before the first hard frost, they will be ok. They can even handle a light frost if you miss your timing.

I am currently using potato towers, what is this burlap sack method you speak of?

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...0#post20221910
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:01 PM
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How about straw bale potatoes. That way you can bring them into a barn or garage when frost is threatening, then bring out in the sun.
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:10 PM
hoplite59 hoplite59 is offline
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I harvested my reds and yukons a week ago and promptly planted french fingerling seed potatoes the next day. Im a bit further east than you but I'm confident they will grow and thrive.
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Old 07-13-2020, 08:16 PM
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I plant my Fall potatoes Round 8-1 and harvest just before Haloween. I deep mulch them in Late Septemberto protect from early frosts. Our soil is too hvy and rich to really grow abundant harvests though.

https://www.hunker.com/13407050/when...-fall-potatoes
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Old 07-13-2020, 09:11 PM
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How about straw bale potatoes. That way you can bring them into a barn or garage when frost is threatening, then bring out in the sun.
Watch out that you don't bring in any hitchhikers like rodents and snakes.

My haybale gardens had more than a few mice and snakes. Some were young copperheads.
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Old 07-14-2020, 07:53 AM
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In Michigan there is only one poisonous snake but I could see rodents being a problem. Inside a barn or storage shed would be a better option.
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Old 07-21-2020, 05:11 PM
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I harvested my reds and yukons a week ago and promptly planted french fingerling seed potatoes the next day. Im a bit further east than you but I'm confident they will grow and thrive.
my spuds broke the surface the past few days ! Nice green growth punching through. Rains coming through should moisten dry beds. I had to add more compost soil. The prior crop just ate up the soil.
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Old 07-21-2020, 06:40 PM
ebjr1967 ebjr1967 is offline
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6b here. I only grow either red norlands or Yukon gold. One round in march, another a few weeks ago. I don't hill, as these two varieties don't need it. They don't keep as long as the long season varieties, so I make sure to keep the first and second rounds separated, but I don't eat much white spuds.

I concentrate more on sweet potatoes, which take the whole season. The following January I grab 2-4 sweet potatoes and start my slips for the coming season.

I would definitely give it a try with the norlands or yukons now in 5b.
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Old 07-25-2020, 09:04 PM
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5b here. What do you have to lose? As you say, finding seed potato is a problem though. Potatoes are fairly cold-tolerant so you might be able to leave them for a week or so even after a light frost. You'll likely want them in before the hard freeze though.

I grow mine in bags on my deck so it's a bit warmer. That definitely helps. Unless I get Verticillium wilt, like I did last year. Potatoes got pulled in June then. But I digress
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Old 07-26-2020, 11:20 AM
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Hmmm, y'all are making me itchy to try it. I still have some Yukon Golds in the closet from the late May digging. If there's a small one sprouting I might have to plant it "just to see". It's hot as Hades here but part of the garden gets shade until noon so maybe that's where I should plant it. An interesting experiment. The first killing frost isn't until around the first week of November.
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Old 07-27-2020, 12:37 AM
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I just let some potatoes I like go to eyes then cut them up and plant them, works great. Plant on planting some more next week.
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Old 07-28-2020, 07:55 AM
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OP is in Zone 5b which tells us about their winter coldness but nothing really conclusive about number of growing days.

Here, we are 6 and there 5b about 50 miles West of me. The last of our three potato plantings in mid-June ( I think) is just flowering, setting spuds, They will yield some. Nowhere close to the vigor of the early May planting. I was using up extra seed potatoes, so, anything is a bonus.

InMichigan
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Old 07-31-2020, 04:24 PM
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+1 citykittyatheart: "What do you have to lose?" The sure-thing is anything you plant, even if it fails, will do better than everything you didn't plant. (My grandmother was a wise woman.) Not spuds, but Bears took out my tomato plants a month after transplanting this year. No time to start over and no replacements to be had anywhere, I direct seeded the seed I had leftover and looked up. Best plants I've ever had. Go for it.
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Old 07-31-2020, 04:56 PM
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I read on youtube about just planting them in grass clippings. I too decided I had nothing to lose, so I planted them with 6-8 inches of grass clippings on top, watered well and just "scratched" the ground under them. They are already up and doing well.
Have a blessed day.
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Old 07-31-2020, 10:13 PM
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I grow 250-350 lbs of those sweet nuggets a year. I personally wouldn't even try in zone 7. You are going to get nice big green stems and leaves and crap all for spuds. Sorry.
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Old 07-31-2020, 10:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyNurse View Post
I read on youtube about just planting them in grass clippings. I too decided I had nothing to lose, so I planted them with 6-8 inches of grass clippings on top, watered well and just "scratched" the ground under them. They are already up and doing well.
Have a blessed day.
We've been doing that for years. It helps most with the little buggers that poke out of the soil and get sun scald. Helps keep moisture in to. Only downside is that it can make a nice haven for field mice and moles. I either get hit hard by them, or not at all. Never understood why.
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Old 08-01-2020, 09:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyNurse View Post
I read on youtube about just planting them in grass clippings. I too decided I had nothing to lose, so I planted them with 6-8 inches of grass clippings on top, watered well and just "scratched" the ground under them. They are already up and doing well.
Have a blessed day.
This is what I do with the red norlands. It has worked great for years. Very easy. I don't even use a fork to dig, just my fingers as they don't go deep.
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Old 08-02-2020, 08:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post
https://harvesttotable.com/how_to_gr...%20fall%20crop.

Plant potatoes no later than 12 weeks before the first expected autumn frost.

If you live where winters are mild and summers are hot, plant late season potatoes in winter for harvest in mid to late spring before the weather turns hot or plant early-season potatoes in late summer for a fall crop.


https://gardenerspath.com/plants/veg...ato-varieties/

Earlies need about 75-90 days underground, or sometimes even less time.
.
We don’t grow or eat tons of potatoes, in a survival situation that could change, but I never thought about what you posted. Yet we routinely plant 3 plantings on yellow squash.

If we are willing to use hay, we can usually postpone the first frost into December.
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