Edibles in East Texas - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newbie Planning to live in East Texas Wilderness Jroos Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 212 09-18-2019 12:48 PM
Grid down, gov't gone, what about foreign takeover? Critterman General Discussion 56 01-02-2019 05:12 PM
East Texas Checking In Phinigma New Member Introduction 21 10-10-2017 09:22 AM
Michiganian looking to move to East Texas Mr. Stafford Texas 6 06-30-2017 10:17 PM
Tornadoes east Texas BytheRivers Manmade and Natural Disasters 4 05-01-2017 09:15 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-09-2019, 12:42 PM
Recrus Recrus is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default Edibles in East Texas



Advertise Here

SO, I live in the East Texas Piney Woods, and spend most of my time outdoors there. After taking some time out of the woods due to the birth of my daughter, I came to the realization that, beyond seasonal berries and tree nuts, I didn't know many wild edibles. I have since begun to study these, and sites like this and foragingtexas.com have greatly helped.

In the last month or so, I've learned to identify chickweed, pony's foot, wood sorrel, and a few other plants.

So, my question is for those in the piney woods or areas of a similar ecosystem. What are your favorite wild edibles?
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Recrus For This Useful Post:
Old 05-09-2019, 12:44 PM
swamppapa swamppapa is online now
Survivor
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: N. central Ok.
Posts: 10,418
Thanks: 2,577
Thanked 17,127 Times in 6,544 Posts
Default

Is “pony’s foot”. The same as colts’foot?
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to swamppapa For This Useful Post:
Old 05-09-2019, 01:20 PM
STEEPOE's Avatar
STEEPOE STEEPOE is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Dallas, Texas
Age: 48
Posts: 2,000
Thanks: 2,047
Thanked 3,044 Times in 1,202 Posts
Default

The Foraging Texas site is fantastic.


https://www.trails.com/facts_3433_wi...as-plants.html

https://www.wildflower.org/collectio...=centex_edible
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to STEEPOE For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-09-2019, 01:33 PM
Recrus Recrus is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default

No, pony's foot is often confused with dollar weed, due to very similar appearance. the biggest difference is that dollar weed is perfectly round and pony's foot has a cleft on one side.


The link below has excellent pictures.
https://www.foragingtexas.com/2007/05/ponys-foot.html
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-09-2019, 03:27 PM
st0n3's Avatar
st0n3 st0n3 is offline
gard'ner
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: middle Georgia
Posts: 905
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,081 Times in 542 Posts
Default

Didn't know that dichondra was edible.
As tough as dichondra is... I can't hardly keep it alive at my house!
Otherwise, it's an attractive ground cover... Sort of...

Was googling stuff similar to hydrocytle... Trying to figure out what you were calling ponys foot... Without clicking...

Supposedly creeping Charlie is edible (glechoma hederacea)

Those people posting that... Must have a different kind than around here... Local stuff smells nasty... I ain't fixing to eat that!
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to st0n3 For This Useful Post:
Old 05-09-2019, 03:51 PM
Recrus Recrus is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 27 Times in 9 Posts
Default

While edible, pony's foot is very bland, and better used to cut bitter herbs or as a filler, I'd imagine. Another edible I found, but haven't tried yet, is green briar. The tubers are supposed to be pretty good and the new tips are said to taste like green beans.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Recrus For This Useful Post:
Old 05-14-2019, 05:16 PM
st0n3's Avatar
st0n3 st0n3 is offline
gard'ner
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: middle Georgia
Posts: 905
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,081 Times in 542 Posts
Default

Now... smilax... that's tasty...
I graze the growing tips when I'm out in the garden... the tubers?
I think not.

I once read that you could grind them and then soak in water, and use the powder that settles to the bottom of the pan... but that's a lot of work for very little.

If you want to eat tubers... you'd be better off digging the canna bed. those actually are edible...

Try evening primrose.
I've cooked the leaves like spinach... kinda fuzzy to eat... like sweet potato leaves... the root from the evening primrose cooks up like a tater... actually surprising that the root is the best part...
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to st0n3 For This Useful Post:
Old 05-20-2019, 08:28 AM
st0n3's Avatar
st0n3 st0n3 is offline
gard'ner
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: middle Georgia
Posts: 905
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,081 Times in 542 Posts
Default

How about yucca?
I dug up some monster roots yesterday, but they don't look like those pictures on the recipe sites...
So many yucca plants stabbing me on my big patch of sand... Unfortunately, seems like tuber collection may be seasonal like with Florida stachys.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to st0n3 For This Useful Post:
Old 05-25-2019, 10:51 PM
Prepper_Ed's Avatar
Prepper_Ed Prepper_Ed is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: NW Arkansas
Posts: 659
Thanks: 788
Thanked 1,511 Times in 478 Posts
Default

What species of yucca? My guidebooks say the roots are toxic because of the soap-like substance found in the roots.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Prepper_Ed For This Useful Post:
Old 05-28-2019, 05:27 PM
st0n3's Avatar
st0n3 st0n3 is offline
gard'ner
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: middle Georgia
Posts: 905
Thanks: 437
Thanked 1,081 Times in 542 Posts
Default

Good thing that I didn't try cooking them...

On re-checking the information... those Cubans are cooking CASSAVA & calling it yuca/yucca.

Explains why the yucca roots I was digging weren't nice and plump like the pics on the recipe sites...

And... Yeah, I'd always heard that you could use yucca roots as shampoo...

and speaking of saponins....
chenopodium seeds are loaded with them... and still, quinoa is considered a wonder grain...

Supposedly you can fill a sock with seed... toss in washing machine... wash the saponins out...

whenever I've cooked with lambsquarter seed... I didn't bother with trying to clean the seeds beyond removing the chaff.

Found an article that advocates saponins as part of a healthy diet....

https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/...-are-saponins/

Things that make you go hmmm...
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to st0n3 For This Useful Post:
Old 06-01-2019, 08:13 PM
Prepper_Ed's Avatar
Prepper_Ed Prepper_Ed is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: NW Arkansas
Posts: 659
Thanks: 788
Thanked 1,511 Times in 478 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by st0n3 View Post
Good thing that I didn't try cooking them...

On re-checking the information... those Cubans are cooking CASSAVA & calling it yuca/yucca.

Explains why the yucca roots I was digging weren't nice and plump like the pics on the recipe sites...

And... Yeah, I'd always heard that you could use yucca roots as shampoo...

and speaking of saponins....
chenopodium seeds are loaded with them... and still, quinoa is considered a wonder grain...

Supposedly you can fill a sock with seed... toss in washing machine... wash the saponins out...

whenever I've cooked with lambsquarter seed... I didn't bother with trying to clean the seeds beyond removing the chaff.

Found an article that advocates saponins as part of a healthy diet....

https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/...-are-saponins/

Things that make you go hmmm...
The flowers of most yucca species are edible and none are toxic. I think I remember reading somewhere that most parts of a Southwestern species whose name I don't remember are edible. I didn't include that plant in my notebook binder because it doesn't grow in Arkansas.

It may be the amount of saponins that makes yucca toxic. There is a common substance in several species of wild edible plants known as oxalic acid. It's found in wood sorrel. Most of the guidebooks I have advise eating only a handful a day. Interestingly, oxalic acid is the toxin that makes the elephant ear plant toxic.
Quick reply to this message
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net