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Old 05-10-2015, 03:37 PM
Robin56 Robin56 is offline
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Hi everyone ...

Just need some input. On the sleeping bag, I have one already but I bought it before I started prepping (many years ago) and I'm not sure if it's right for me. For example, the one I have is 100% polyester tricot filling (3 lbs) with a 100% nylon outer covering. It doesn't say anything about temperature rating on the tags. One thing I've heard about sleeping bags is it's best to have one you can roll up tight and hook to the bottom of your BOB. When I roll this up, it's bigger than my BOB! In my area, I'd like to have something that will keep me warm down to 0 degrees as it's been known to get down to 25 degrees on occasion. This might be a good one -- just not sure.

As for the storage topic, I talked about this once before but I can't seem to find it now. The gist of it is ... I live in a 14x80 mobile home -- just me and two ultimately edible cats (kidding!). However, my two spare rooms are now almost completely filled with my preps -- food included. I've tried but can't condense it further and still get to something if I need it. After much deliberation, I'm considering renting a self-storage building about 3 miles from my home. I recall, though, that some folks felt this would not be a good thing to do with security of the storage building being a major issue. I do feel the same way to a degree. But I'm really becoming overloaded here.

I was hoping to get opinions just one last time on the building before I make a final decision -- perhaps options I haven't considered. And also about the sleeping bag.

Many thanks in advance to all ... Robin
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:45 PM
Robin56 Robin56 is offline
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Well ... just read a post a few down from this one and someone had their storage building broken into. I guess that settles that.

Back to the drawing board.

Thanks anyway, folks.

... Robin
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:52 PM
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Doubtful a 3# bag is rated to 25 unless it is perhaps down. Put your stuff in like milk crates stacked floor to nearly ceiling. The bottom crate has wheels. Wheel the first row of stacks into the hall way so you can move around in the room. Number all crates and keep a log of contents and the location.

Build a storage shed like they sell at home depot. Clothing, paper products and stuff that is hot and cold proof stuff will do just fine in good totes that seal. The not paying rent will pay for it in a year or two.
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:57 PM
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5+ bag $39 free shipping http://www.amazon.com/Suisse-Sport-A...1291279&sr=1-5
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Old 05-10-2015, 08:41 PM
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What you could do is if its an outdoor unit build yourself crates or gated area that you can move and what not. Have it locked and its an extra line of defense/security
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Old 05-11-2015, 05:19 AM
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Get a good quality down bag with baffles that is water resistant, or better yet a down HIKING quilt, (it is the latest thing because having a closed bag can be uncomfortable for mobile sleepers and the down under you is wasted anyway). It will be lighter than the artificial stuff and will hold up better. The newer water resistant treated down and a waterproof bag to carry it in should reduce the risk that wet down will not insulate well. I also recommend a closed cell pad and a body only hiking air mattress to go on top of it for comfort. Hiking quilts can be attached to the pad via Velcro or other connectors. Also keep some mylar or other reflective covering, either blankets and/or bag, but beware of sweating, so maybe best for the blanket under your mat and one to go over your bag that can be tucked or removed if you get too hot. Weight is key, so try to get a down bag or quilt with 600-700 fill, (more or less if weather dictates). There is a lot of information about these things on hiking sites.

There are lightweight microfiber artificial bags that will rate low temperature as well, but they may not be as easy to find. If they had them readily available here in South Africa, I would go the down hiking quilt route, but I have an artificial lightweight bag and plan to get a light rectangular down bag to open and share with my wive like a quilt on top of the small bags.

I have found these things out the hard way because I also bought heavy bulky sleeping bags initially then I actually went overnight hiking and found how hard it is to sleep comfortably in less than idea conditions. Sleeping systems vary widely and people have differing opinions, so do lots of research before you decide what is best for you, but lighter is always better when hiking.

BTW, sleeping bags are supposed to be stored uncompressed outside their bags when not in use to make them last longer, especially for the artificial fiber types. This may be an issue for you since you have cats.
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Old 05-11-2015, 06:42 AM
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First thing: test the bag. Use it in the poor conditions you are worried about.

Even if it ultimately is too big for your BOB it still can have use if you had to bug in for any period of time.

Second: search the name brand and such on the net. Going to manufacturer website and such might give you better ideas about its capabilities.

Third: Just because it is not the newest or best does not mean it has no use. I have several older bags I keep in my preps just like I do some wool blankets. If not for camping and the like, who knows what help they may be if you have friends over when SHTF.

Fourth: if it does not have one, get a stuff sack for the sleeping bag. They are inexpensive and can help you compress a big bag down way more than you might expect. I have a heavy winter bag my father used on hunting trips all over BC and Alberta in all sorts of weather and seasons. I once slept in it with a girlfriend it is that spacious. In its sack it came with (not even a proper compression one) it shrinks down more than enough to strap it to the bottom of a pack. Is it as small and light as some of the high tech ones now? No, but it is proven and still worth keeping.

As to your storage issues, I HIGHLY recommend you peruse this board. There are TONS of threads on maximizing storage, getting creative with space, and the like. Make sure you are using the space effectively; I discovered very quickly that in some ways I was and in others I had not even hit the target let alone the bullseye.

Search feature is your best friend on this board.
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Old 05-11-2015, 06:51 AM
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Are you using a compression sack to squash the bag down or just rolling it up? Since it's getting to the warm season I'd try out the bag you have and understand how well it works before getting another one. If you don't have a compression sack get one. They aren't expensive. Try it out to see how well your current bag shrinks down.

You might also want to investigate bivy bags. There are mil surplus ones available that are made with Gortex. These give you a water proof shell and add 10 degrees or so to the performance of the sleeping bag. They are relatively light weight and have a lot of survival uses in a bug out situation. Also often colored camo which can help conceal you.
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Old 05-11-2015, 10:26 AM
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You may try carrying the bag on top of the BOB. This way it won't hit you in the back of the legs, and it'll provide padding for the neck and head if you fall backwards, and provide a little protection from blows from behind.
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Old 05-11-2015, 11:18 AM
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I'd say look at a warmer weather bag and a reactor liner. I have a marmot nanowave 45 and a reactor liner and bag liner together adds about 20deg tk bag comfort level.
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Old 05-11-2015, 03:09 PM
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Poncho, poncho liner, 12X12 tarp, 2 Velcro straps, attach to bottom of pack. Need more than that its too cold - build fire.

Its just that simple
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Old 05-11-2015, 03:28 PM
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Some scrap 2x4s and a pair of these for each stack of crates or the premade ones for a few bucks more. Buy them on sale for a better price.

http://www.harborfreight.com/3-wheel...lly-68902.html


Larger milk crates http://www.milkcratesdirect.com/set-...ar-milk-crates
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:20 PM
Robin56 Robin56 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by franklin View Post
Are you using a compression sack to squash the bag down or just rolling it up? Since it's getting to the warm season I'd try out the bag you have and understand how well it works before getting another one. If you don't have a compression sack get one. They aren't expensive. Try it out to see how well your current bag shrinks down.

You might also want to investigate bivy bags. There are mil surplus ones available that are made with Gortex. These give you a water proof shell and add 10 degrees or so to the performance of the sleeping bag. They are relatively light weight and have a lot of survival uses in a bug out situation. Also often colored camo which can help conceal you.
Mine has a bag but I was never able to get the sleeping bag back into it. [sigh]

Thank you ... Robin
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Old 05-13-2015, 01:57 AM
Writer's Block Writer's Block is offline
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Here is a trick I use on old winter bags due to thickness and such sometimes causing a tough time rebagging them.

Get a 1" x1" square dowel about 6" longer than the stuff sack is deep. Sand the edges to make sure no splinters and to round the edges just slightly. Also get a pack of two compression straps (Coughan makes em as well as several other companies). Get the straps already in a loop and set aside.

Lay the sleep bag out, then fold it in half along its width (the direction you would lie in). Starting at the bottom, place the dowel on the bag and roll the bag tightly around the dowel like putting paper towel back on a roll. THIS is why a square dowel; done tight a round dowel is harder to remove. Make sure you keep about 3" of handle on each side, but don't try to roll it like that. The handle space is just to help judge keeping it lined up straight at this point.

Once it is wound up tight as you can get it, roll it like a rolling pin pulling it tight as you can get it. Then put one strap onto each end of the rolled up bag about two inches from the end on both sides. Cinch them tight, but don't make it bulge too much in the middle.

This should be small enough diameter to go in the sack (if not, get a slightly larger sack). Pull the sack over the end and get the roll evenly into the bag. As the dowel starts to get in the way, pull it out enough to have it 6" out on the open sack end and flush with the roll on the bottom. Pull the bag up using the rod to help wiggle the roll if it gets stuck. Pull the dowel out when bag all the way up. Close sack.

Depending on the size of the roll and the bag, take the compression straps off if you can. If not, after getting it successfully packed a few times you will have an easier time.
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:03 AM
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In you mobile home..pull out the dresser drawers and see if you can build some 4inch shelves behind them,,that is the first thing I checked when I was looking to buy one awhile back...

also your inside walls of the mobile home,can you take the panel or dry wall off and build some shelves in those and cover them back up, only use inner walls..

also under you sink where the sink bends down you could build something on eighter side
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Old 05-13-2015, 07:28 AM
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Can't you go down, i.e. UNDER the mobile home? Get a floor hatch installed and bury some barrels/juice containers which you can seal up. Depends on the layout but you presumably have plants/planters/trellis round the base of the mobile home which would reduce the likelihood of unwelcome eyes seeing what you're doing.

It could all get a bit 'Great Escape' as you kick the soil around, but you may be able to just bag up small amounts, carry it to the car and dump it by the road out of sight.
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Old 05-13-2015, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin56 View Post
Well ... just read a post a few down from this one and someone had their storage building broken into. I guess that settles that.
Sure, it's possible for storage unit break-ins to occur, the VAST majority of renters never have this happen, so I wouldn't necessarily write it off. If anything, it may actually be more secure. Having lived in apartments with rental-style garages for many years, sometimes in bad neighborhoods, I never had anything disappear. You just never know.

Keeping the absolute essentials at home and redundant or "highly situational" items in offsite storage frees up living space. Otherwise, if you can have outdoor storage lockers or sheds like those made by Sterilite, Rubbermade and others, you might find some used ones for very reasonable prices.
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Old 05-13-2015, 03:14 PM
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You can always try one of these. I lasted about 2 hrs in one before I was up in a t-shirt and shorts removing the plastic. Even with a good vent it was just too hot for me to go to sleep. I still have plastic and mylar in the bags in case the double digits are below zero. At 27 degrees it was just too warm for me.

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