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Old 03-25-2019, 01:06 AM
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I agree. Without the money collected from hunting/fishing licenses and the federal excise tax on firearms and ammunition (11%) fish and game outfits would be broke.

Lewis and Clark nearly starved to death crossing the continental divide at Lolo Pass. I think they and the crew were extremely confidant mountain men/survivors/explorers.

My dad was kid during the great depression. On of the most successful deer poachers he knew back then used a single shot 22 with shorts. The extractor was broken and he had to pry out the empties with his pocket knife. He shot them in the eye.

My buddies Grampa 'Red' shot hundreds of deer and elk for camp meat at the mine, which was legal at the time with a single shot 22 Mag. He shot them in the heart.
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Old 03-25-2019, 08:08 AM
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I think it just depends on your "survival" situation

All these different kinds of weapons will be hard to carry afoot!

Unless you have a tactical wheelbarrow or a pick up truck, you're going to need to hump everything along with what it takes to survive on a daily basis

I would suggest a highly accurate .22 or a .223 either single shot or bolt

Be prepared to eat a lot of pigeon and sparrow meat and not much else unless you can fish

If you're just stuck out in the woods is one thing but an apocalyptic event, most all your edible game will either dry up rather quickly or bug out also!

To the OP:

You have only 3 posts, now make some replies because there has been some good information presented here, otherwise you just look like another troll

Don't forget your thanks button either!
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Old 03-25-2019, 11:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charliemeyer007 View Post
I agree. Without the money collected from hunting/fishing licenses and the federal excise tax on firearms and ammunition (11%) fish and game outfits would be broke.

Lewis and Clark nearly starved to death crossing the continental divide at Lolo Pass. I think they and the crew were extremely confidant mountain men/survivors/explorers.

My dad was kid during the great depression. On of the most successful deer poachers he knew back then used a single shot 22 with shorts. The extractor was broken and he had to pry out the empties with his pocket knife. He shot them in the eye.

My buddies Grampa 'Red' shot hundreds of deer and elk for camp meat at the mine, which was legal at the time with a single shot 22 Mag. He shot them in the heart.
Sure it wasn't a Red Rider?
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Old 03-26-2019, 07:24 AM
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22 high speed shorts. Later they made that guy the game warden.

Back in the late 70's I acquired a H&R combo. A 22 Hornet barrel and a a 3" mag 20 gauge. The 20 was a pleasure to carry, however the Hornet was heavy as hell because it was 20 barrel with a little hole. Plus it would stick cases sometimes, always at the worst times. I usually carried a section of cleaning rod to knock them out.

I had worked up a nice quiet Hornet load with cast bullets. There was this doe at about 80 yards. I shot her right between the eyes, and she fell like a ton of bricks. The rifle chose this time to stick a case. I didn't have my rod either. So I'm fiddling with my pocket knife to clear the jam.

That doe starts wiggling a leg, then 2. Next she is pulling herself down hill, then up on 3 legs sort of stumbling and finally she was running away on all 4 without any apparent handicap. From shot to gone was less than 3 minutes.
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Old 03-29-2019, 11:14 PM
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An interesting observation, most of the experts that I have read, Brad Angier for example recommended something along the lines of a .30-06 as the primary choice with a scattergun and .22 rifle for small game, added when possible.
Angier also said that he would have preferred a .22 pistol to the rifle but they weren't legal in Canada where he was going.

People seem highly concerned with black hats, but with the original poster being in the Black Hills, I think that is less of a concern than someone along a normal escape route.

Minimal effort for maximum gain is what we are all looking at. Pound for pound, what gives you the most "meat" for your efforts and expense?

Where we used to live, I could fill the freezer with a shovel and a couple dozen 5-gallon buckets. Geese are extremely stupid.
Fish, either by netting, trot lines or one of several less than legal means could be gathered quickly.

I like my full power bolt action rifle for most things but if things go south, the Blackout will probably become the gun that goes afield when I need to just gather meat in some nefarious method.
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Old 03-30-2019, 02:56 AM
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I havenít replied to the comments on this thread due to work and being out of the area visiting family. Now that I have a few minutes, I would like to address a few of the comments. I will try not to get too snarky, but no guarantees.

First off, I tried to place my question in the context of what my wife and I already carry and the reasons why.
1.The handguns are part of our EDC and we would already have them with us, so why ditch them except for weight restrictions.
2.My wife has permanent wrist injuries that make racking most pistols larger than .380 an issue, as well as recoil. Shared ammo and magazines would be nice, but a no-go due to her injuries.
3.Slingshot: I carry extra bands. Iím aware that it wonít kill large game; I noted that it is for small game.

Good ideas:
4.Snares/Traps: Rat traps are a solid idea; I found a source for metal Figure 4 traps from Dave Canterbury. Metal snares are generally single use, but a few of them might be handy. Cordage ones can be made as needed.
5.Bugging-in would be my preferred choice but I live in an apartment with limited resources. I do have a bug-in option at my buddyís place, 20 miles out of town, which I am helping him stock.
6.Excellent catch on the difference between hunt and harvest. Old England poaching may be more accurate of a description of what I will be doing, lol.

Things I should have been clearer about:
7.My background is extensive colonial longhunter and western mountain man re-enactments, as well as growing up on a 1000 acre farm/ranch in NE South Dakota. As such, I have extensive experience hunting, skinning, brain tanning, and processing game. Iíve also made Lakota short bows, arrows, and flint-knapped arrowheads.
8.My wife is skilled in herbal remedies, poultices, tinctures, etc. I know the plants, she knows what to do with them. We also each carry a small pouch that contains essential oils in case we canít find the plants.
9.My wife and I have INCH packs set up, running 35# not including bedrolls.
10.While there are fish in the Black Hills, there arenít a lot. If I was back in NE South Dakota, completely different story.
11.Wife has a hand crossbow that she is wickedly accurate with. How to strap it onto the pack and not have it snag is a bit of an issue, however.
12.I have a sawed-off .12-gauge that I have for security work, but wanted something more multi-purpose.

Finally, the snarky part. I wonder how many people actually read my post in its entirety before responding. It is obvious that some of you did, so thank you. Some either didnít actually read and process it, or they just wanted to voice their opinion anyway. Freedom of speech allows you to do that. ĎMurica!
13.If you didnít check out the video by the Wooded Beardsman or the Woodtrekker.blockspot info, you probably shouldnít have responded to the question. There was a reason I included that info. Fat is as important as protein, if not more so. Itís important. Kudos to Wilderness Bushman and anybody else who read/watched it.
14.Foraging for plants or bugs. Exceedingly poor calorie expenditure to gain ratio. If I happen across some, cool. Ainít going out of my way. Long term storage is also an issue; their protein is only good fresh.

So, going to look into the pros/cons of .308, 30.06, and possibly .243. An important consideration is how many of each are in the area, as access to more ammo may be limited to what I can scavenge.

Snarky or not, thanks to all to have taken time to post.
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Old 03-30-2019, 07:28 AM
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A .22lr will drop anything from a squirrel to a bear.

Why use anything else?

And poo covered .22lr destroys any living thing.
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Old 03-30-2019, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Campsinger View Post

What would you recommend as the best way to procure larger game? I live in the Black Hills of South Dakota, and the wild game available consists of buffalo, elk, pronghorn antelope, whitetail and mule deer, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, coyotes, wolves, fox, mountain lions, bobcats, porcupines, turkeys, marmots (woodchucks), squirrels, cottontails, mink, muskrats, beavers, racoons, and trout.

I would assume a rifle/carbine of some sort, but what is the smartest route to go and still stay on some kind of budget, plus take into account ammunition and be aware of weight? A .30/30, a .30/06, an AR in .223 or 308, or a 12 gauge with birdshot/buckshot/slugs? Maybe a .44 scoped pistol instead? A recurve, compound, or crossbow?
I for one am glad you came back into the discussion, you gotta understand, a lot of the old timers here have seen a lot of "one and done" posts aside from the trolls

Let's focus on some key points that you had in you original post. I bolded them

If it was me, there are only 2 real choices, the 30-06 and/or the 308, here's why:

You are in a "survival" situation, so that tells me you need to eat, the sooner the better!

You live in the Black Hills, you will most likely need a high power rifle with some range!

You requested for the "best way to procure large game"

Let's focus on the large game you presented:

Buffalo- Tough to bring down, with a light caliber, you'll most likely need to get really close, in which case they could have the ability to charge you then stomp you to death

Elk-tough to bring down, you'll not likely get close enough for a light caliber, if you do use one, most likely need to track the animal, you need a heavy enough bullet to give you a "punch thru" to leave a blood trail otherwise you go hungry

Pronghorn, Muleys, Big Horn sheep, Moutain goats are far ranging animals, maybe not the muleys so much but the others you will need a gun with some long range punch as they aren't likely to let you get very close. Consider the fact they all have great vision and exceptional sense of smell

Again, you are in a "survival" situation, you want the odds in your favor

I for one, don't want to chase my game especially if I'm hungry. I might not have that kind of energy

I would choose the 30-06, the reason why is I'm more likely to find the ammo I would be using as it's the more popular hunting cartridge if I did have to do some scavenging in South Dakota

As far as the small game you had listed, I'd take head shots with a properly scoped rifle as I've done that most all my life!

These are JMO using the parameters you set

FWIW
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Old 03-30-2019, 09:43 AM
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I would look at each animal you listed and figure what the options for each are, then decide how much you want to chase.
Or at least by category:
1) buffalo, bear (obviously larger caliber is preferred. depends on range).

2) elk, pronghorn antelope, whitetail and mule deer, bighorn sheep, mountain goats. (rifle, depends on range)

3) coyotes, wolves, fox, (rifle. depends on range)

4) mountain lions, bobcats, (snares, They will see you first, so sight hunting might not work so well).

5) porcupines, turkeys, marmots (woodchucks), squirrels, cottontails,

6) mink, fox, muskrats, beavers, (Scented special traps, underwater conibear sets for the aquatic ones)

7) racoons,

Fish. (flyrod, spinning rod/reel, yoyos, nets, trot lines. )

crawfish (special little traps and larger nets.

Mice/rats

Birds (Geese ducks)

Birds smaller

Personally I like
a good .22 nitro piston rifle (I like my Hatsan)
a good .22LR rifle
a 12 Gauge pump modified choke. May have a LOT of little birds flying around.
.243 for the fox etc.
30-06 for larger stuff.


If you have large animal long range needs, then step up to whatever is called for.

I would not overlook pond frogs, turtles, snakes, gators.

As nasty as it sounds, if I was hungry and surrounded by grasshoppers, crickets and worms, they would be added to a stew pot with some greens. Having some seasoning stored up would be helpful.

Preserving the meat from some large animal will be a chore.

If near the ocean or other large bodies of water, other opportunities present themselves. (Crab, etc.
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Old 03-30-2019, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Campsinger View Post
I haven’t replied to the comments on this thread due to work and being out of the area visiting family. Now that I have a few minutes, I would like to address a few of the comments. I will try not to get too snarky, but no guarantees.

First off, I tried to place my question in the context of what my wife and I already carry and the reasons why.
1.The handguns are part of our EDC and we would already have them with us, so why ditch them except for weight restrictions.
2.My wife has permanent wrist injuries that make racking most pistols larger than .380 an issue, as well as recoil. Shared ammo and magazines would be nice, but a no-go due to her injuries.
3.Slingshot: I carry extra bands. I’m aware that it won’t kill large game; I noted that it is for small game.

Good ideas:
4.Snares/Traps: Rat traps are a solid idea; I found a source for metal Figure 4 traps from Dave Canterbury. Metal snares are generally single use, but a few of them might be handy. Cordage ones can be made as needed.
5.Bugging-in would be my preferred choice but I live in an apartment with limited resources. I do have a bug-in option at my buddy’s place, 20 miles out of town, which I am helping him stock.
6.Excellent catch on the difference between hunt and harvest. Old England poaching may be more accurate of a description of what I will be doing, lol.

Things I should have been clearer about:
7.My background is extensive colonial longhunter and western mountain man re-enactments, as well as growing up on a 1000 acre farm/ranch in NE South Dakota. As such, I have extensive experience hunting, skinning, brain tanning, and processing game. I’ve also made Lakota short bows, arrows, and flint-knapped arrowheads.
8.My wife is skilled in herbal remedies, poultices, tinctures, etc. I know the plants, she knows what to do with them. We also each carry a small pouch that contains essential oils in case we can’t find the plants.
9.My wife and I have INCH packs set up, running 35# not including bedrolls.
10.While there are fish in the Black Hills, there aren’t a lot. If I was back in NE South Dakota, completely different story.
11.Wife has a hand crossbow that she is wickedly accurate with. How to strap it onto the pack and not have it snag is a bit of an issue, however.
12.I have a sawed-off .12-gauge that I have for security work, but wanted something more multi-purpose.

Finally, the snarky part. I wonder how many people actually read my post in its entirety before responding. It is obvious that some of you did, so thank you. Some either didn’t actually read and process it, or they just wanted to voice their opinion anyway. Freedom of speech allows you to do that. ‘Murica!
13.If you didn’t check out the video by the Wooded Beardsman or the Woodtrekker.blockspot info, you probably shouldn’t have responded to the question. There was a reason I included that info. Fat is as important as protein, if not more so. It’s important. Kudos to Wilderness Bushman and anybody else who read/watched it.
14.Foraging for plants or bugs. Exceedingly poor calorie expenditure to gain ratio. If I happen across some, cool. Ain’t going out of my way. Long term storage is also an issue; their protein is only good fresh.

So, going to look into the pros/cons of .308, 30.06, and possibly .243. An important consideration is how many of each are in the area, as access to more ammo may be limited to what I can scavenge.

Snarky or not, thanks to all to have taken time to post.
Your second post helps narrow it down a bit.

1. Since you have a place to go, and are stocking items there already, weight restrictions should only apply to your INCH bags and the possibility that you are forced to move the 20 miles on foot. In addition, a group of trusted folks will have a better chance via sure living than a married couple ...overall. I would also look into livestock and at least gardening.

2. " OLD ENGLAND POACHING" is a very good way to describe it imo. I would suggest replacing sling shots and archery with suppressors. ( You want the critter drt without drawing any unwanted attention your way.)
Note: A disadvantage where trapping is concerned.

3. Preserving meat obtained from large game is not as easy as drive thru fast food, but not impossible. We use 3 methods primarily..... Freezing, canning, and dehydration ( jerky). All 3 have advantages and disadvantages. Home canning is roughly 20 times more important than reloading ammo with me and mine. In addition, your looking at a much bigger return in meat at the cost of one bullet ...vs.... The same amount of meat via small game and multiple rds of ammo it took to do the same.

4. 308 vs 3006 . Any game you listed plus more won't know the difference if hit by either in the right place. ( Have used both).
308 will give you a tad less felt recoil, a bit less in weight/ space concerning ammunition, a short action which can save a bit of weight via rifle choice, and more options in rifle choice, especially semiautomatics.
I would focus more towards rifle by type instead, as well as the " best" ammunition you can utilize for big game hunting. ( Barnes TSX/TTSX, Nosler Accubond, and Sierra Game kings are 3 top picks in my experience )

Note: Follow this link . Plenty of info regarding ammunition by weight/ volume.....

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...d.php?t=831626

5. Scavenging is a very bad idea, and for same reasons as attempts to take from others. In short...both are one and the same. I do see some merit in research directed towards using a common cartridge found in a local area however. The purpose should be directed towards barter/ trade instead. Hungry folks who can't hunt/ harvest/ poach thier own food will be more apt to trade with others that can.

6. 243 or 6mm Rem: Always under rated as a hunting cartridge. ( As is 7.62x39mm) . 243 would be my absolute minimum vs large game. With that said, I prefer a cartridge that leans towards optimum instead, and especially if the plan is to survive post shtf by what is to be taken.

7. Security should not be overlooked. A sawed up shotgun with shells is too heavy and cumbersome to take along with a hunting rifle, and it can't replace a rifle either. One idea= A long gun that serves well in both roles. ( 1st Pic below is an example, and one that I have been using in both roles for decades now.....) Excellent iron sights, and a solid means of mounting optics in 2 different locations. 2nd and 3rd pic.
4th pic is one factory version of ammunition that meets all medium/ big game hunting requirements anywhere in this hemisphere from point blank out past 400 yards, and also meets all security requirements too include barrier penetration , vehicles, trees, etc....... ( 168gr Barnes TTSX)A very close second = 168gr Nosler LR Accubond. The 165gr HPBT game kings = A bullet that we stocked heavily back when they could be had on the cheap, and has been an overall good performer vs med and large game.

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Old 03-30-2019, 02:24 PM
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Almost every state in the union, theres a lot more livestock than wild game and a .22lr suffices. Much of the time, preserving the meat of a big critter is a helluva lot of work and will require a smoky fire, which will call in your killers. So will un-suppressed gunfire, especially high-powered rifle blasts, which can be heard for well over a mile. Cold weather, if it's consistently below 40F will help preserve meat and fis, especially if you bury it. Of course, freezing weather will do so indefinitely, but then you'll have even more risks of fire calling in your killers. In cold country, there's snow. A blood trail, or even just tracks, are very easily followed in snow. Many a dog will follow a blood trail quite easily, also. Not every moose is a 1500 lb monster. Chris McCandless took one with a .22lr. Probably a calf, but nobody knows (apparently). My point is, you're not unarmed because you 'only" have a 223, if you know to have 60 gr Nosler Partition softpoint ammo in it. I'd much rather prefer to have to brain elk, moose or bears with a Sound-suppressed AR 223 than have to fight with a noisy bolt action, or have an 06 for which I've run out of ammo. You won't be as remote and all alone as you "think" that you'll be. Such 223 sp''s will take deer and hogs every bit as well as the 30-30 ever did.
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Old 03-30-2019, 02:59 PM
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A single high powered rifle shot is very hard to pinpoint.

Repeated shots with (not enough gun) are.
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Old 03-30-2019, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
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Almost every state in the union, theres a lot more livestock than wild game and a .22lr suffices. Much of the time, preserving the meat of a big critter is a helluva lot of work and will require a smoky fire, which will call in your killers. So will un-suppressed gunfire, especially high-powered rifle blasts, which can be heard for well over a mile. Cold weather, if it's consistently below 40F will help preserve meat and fis, especially if you bury it. Of course, freezing weather will do so indefinitely, but then you'll have even more risks of fire calling in your killers. In cold country, there's snow. A blood trail, or even just tracks, are very easily followed in snow. Many a dog will follow a blood trail quite easily, also. Not every moose is a 1500 lb monster. Chris McCandless took one with a .22lr. Probably a calf, but nobody knows (apparently). My point is, you're not unarmed because you 'only" have a 223, if you know to have 60 gr Nosler Partition softpoint ammo in it. I'd much rather prefer to have to brain elk, moose or bears with a Sound-suppressed AR 223 than have to fight with a noisy bolt action, or have an 06 for which I've run out of ammo. You won't be as remote and all alone as you "think" that you'll be. Such 223 sp''s will take deer and hogs every bit as well as the 30-30 ever did.
1. I would agree with utilizing suppressors and semiauto rifles. However.....the AR is not exclusive towards either, and not the most silent / efficient , and not the most reliable.

2. Good luck tracking down a single shot fired in the mountains, tracking boot prints in the snow, using dogs to follow blood, etc....
Any of that nonsense could turn them " killers" into the ones who get killed. Cmon now...That is survival 101 stuff when in a hostile environment. ( If your worried about being hunted, learn to hunt them)

3. You don't need a smoky fire to preserve meat or stay warm. One can preserve meat without a fire at all using 2 different methods . ( food preservation 101).

4. Survival is gonna be alot of work, all under a different mindset that TV experts never mention.....ever.
Lets compare using this example: 1 elk taken at 166 yards after one hunt and the work/ time it takes to dress him out, transport him, feed a group of 8 adults, and preserve what is left for times when there are not alot of critters runnin around.

Now compare that to the time it takes to feed 8 people strictly from rabbits or squirrel. ( Not to mention the sheer amount of ammunition at 1 per critter) When it becomes very difficult to get within range of one in the first place. Multiple shots ringin away thru the valley.In the end, you would be lucky to have any left to preserve for hard times......but all in the name of " less work"... Right?

Not hardly.


4. Your close. 7.62x39mm compares well to 3030. 223 never has and hasn't still. ( Especially at hog hunting year around on foot.) Also illegal to use for deer, goat, elk, bear, and moose hunting in some states for a reason.
Yup ...it has before, but so has a rock. Although more efficient with decent bullets, there are much better options to choose from.

My point= Focus towards optimum if your life depends on it...along with your family/ group.

Minimum may work well for folks who have other primary ways to gather food. ( Fish due to living where they are abundant and other game are not.

Fwiw. .....If the end all unicorn for you is a suppressed AR, look towards 300 blackout .

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Old 03-30-2019, 11:29 PM
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no, you dont want a single shot or a bolt action, cause combat is going to be a constant threat. You wont want to be without a silencer and subsonic ammo, either. If an auto loader malfunctions with every shot, it's still faster to fire again than any single shot. If it malfunctions once every 3 cycles, it's still faster for 5 shots than any bolt action can ever be. So the "complicated/ failure prone" claim for autos is a stupid argument. yeah, yeah, you can get all the mason jars, etc, into the woods with you. :-) get lost. Desperate people do desperate things and there's going to be lots of such people. Choosing guns that dont offer easily replaced, lw, compact ammo is just stupid. The game is all going to be gone a couple of months post shtf, killed by people, dogs and cats. Cannibalism will be a commonplace event within 3-4 months. It will be that bad. The world is full of horrible, inept people, totally unprepared for anything, and perfectly willing to do anything to live another 24 hours.
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Old 03-31-2019, 12:59 AM
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A couple of clarifications concerning my views, which folks may not like or agree with. This is all with the survival of me and mine being paramount. Ain't gonna be concerned with the survival of others unless they can contribute to the survival of me and mine.

1. Taking from others.
They may be already dead due to other causes. Homesteads abandoned. They may have tried to take things from me and failed. In any event, lots of that type of scavenging gonna happen. Is it dangerous? Absolutely. But that choice is occasionally gonna be forced upon me. Not everybody you run into post SHTF is gonna be friendly. In fact, most will not be.

2. I forgot a common game animal ... dogs. In fact, it will and should be high on everybody's list to shoot dogs for food and to eliminate warning/security from others.

3. I'm well trained on the use of a spear, and my buddy has forged a spearhead for me. Works when ammo runs out.

4. Whenever I think about a post SHTF world, I am continually drawn back to the movie "The Postman." Critics hated the movie, but it's a damn good explanation for feudalism.

5. Weight limits are important to consider for packs. Mine and my wife's run 35# without sleep systems or long guns/ammo. I still need to add a Kelly Kettle to mine, and a water purifier to hers (either a Katadyn or an MSR Miniworks). I'm pretty good on skill sets due to re-enacting plus bushcraft. I want to pare the packs down another 5-8# if possible, though.
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Old 03-31-2019, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by beingto View Post
no, you dont want a single shot or a bolt action, cause combat is going to be a constant threat. You wont want to be without a silencer and subsonic ammo, either. If an auto loader malfunctions with every shot, it's still faster to fire again than any single shot. If it malfunctions once every 3 cycles, it's still faster for 5 shots than any bolt action can ever be. So the "complicated/ failure prone" claim for autos is a stupid argument. yeah, yeah, you can get all the mason jars, etc, into the woods with you. :-) get lost. Desperate people do desperate things and there's going to be lots of such people. Choosing guns that dont offer easily replaced, lw, compact ammo is just stupid. The game is all going to be gone a couple of months post shtf, killed by people, dogs and cats. Cannibalism will be a commonplace event within 3-4 months. It will be that bad. The world is full of horrible, inept people, totally unprepared for anything, and perfectly willing to do anything to live another 24 hours.
So much fail in 1 post I don't know where to begin.

Not worth the time to refute point by point.
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Old 03-31-2019, 08:26 AM
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So much fail in 1 post I don't know where to begin.

Not worth the time to refute point by point.

what you mean is you CANT, so why expose your ignorance?
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Old 03-31-2019, 08:30 AM
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if your pack is 35 lbs without sleep gear,or longguns, those things are going to add 20 lbs, unless it's just .22lr, And you'll still need armor and night vision. That's at least 7 lbs more.even if only soft, concealable armor. Best have a mountain bicycle to carry the weight, while you walk alongside of it, the rifle spring-clamped to the handle bars. You're going to need a gallon of water per day, at the least and that's 8 lbs, right there. YOu'll need 2 lbs of calorie-dense food per day, too.
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Old 03-31-2019, 09:59 PM
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Things I should have been clearer about:
7.My background is extensive colonial longhunter and western mountain man re-enactments, as well as growing up on a 1000 acre farm/ranch in NE South Dakota. As such, I have extensive experience hunting, skinning, brain tanning, and processing game. I’ve also made Lakota short bows, arrows, and flint-knapped arrowheads.
Yes. If you would have included that information in your first post you would have probably gotten a different set of responses than what you got. You made it sound as if all you had were a 22 rifle, a couple of pistols and a slingshot. With the experience you listed I sort of wonder why you are asking us? You should be sharing what you know.

And I read the link you posted. The guy with the blog has survival reduced down to "The Numbers". I didn't know you could so cleanly reduce survival and SHTF to mere numbers. But I take everyone with a blog and a YouTube channel with a huge dose of salt. In this day anyone with a computer can have a blog and a guy with a camera can have a youtube channel. And they are all experts.

You want a gun to procure large game? Buy a 30-06. A 308. A .270. A 30-30 or 35 Remington. It doesn't really matter. They all kill about the same same. And calibers don't kill animals. Bullets do. Learn to shoot and learn to hunt and about anything you have will work. I have read a lot of Finn Aagaard and he stated in the non magnum rounds he saw used had almost no difference in killing power as long as the bullets were well placed and held together. I have killed deer and elk with everything from a 22LR to a 54 caliber BP rifle.

And my tongue in cheek joke about you can't kill large game with a slingshot is not exactly true. I have read of deer being killed with head shots from one of the more powerful slingshots. So it can be done but I would never ever recommend anyone other than Jorge Sprave try it.
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Old 04-03-2019, 05:09 AM
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Yes. If you would have included that information in your first post you would have probably gotten a different set of responses than what you got.
I didn't want to come off as a "know it all." Every forum on every topic on the internet has several of those, and I didn't want to be lumped in with them. So I just listed the pertinent gear to the question.


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And I read the link you posted. The guy with the blog has survival reduced down to "The Numbers". I didn't know you could so cleanly reduce survival and SHTF to mere numbers.
I agree, nothing never works by "The Numbers." "Every plan is perfect until the first boots hit the ground," I believe is how the saying goes. In any event, it did cause me to rethink things. Especially after the Wooded Beardsman actually went into the field and tested it. Bear in mind that he still lost weight and he didn't do any survival activities such as shelter/firewood/etc. Those caloric expenditures are huge.

Good thing I carry some extra body fat, carefully hoarded against possible SHTF apocalypse times. That's my story and I'm sticking to it!
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