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Old 12-05-2017, 09:04 AM
sixtus sixtus is offline
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for responding quickly?

Do others do timed scenarios(maybe hurricane or tsunami incoming, mass riots, whatever) packed the vehicle, picked up the kids and wife and didn't stop timing until the vehicle hit the road or the house was bugged in or rucksacks were on backs? Who actually knows their response time, proven, for each?

Who does inventory broken into periodic checks

Eg Monthly- Optics, weapons, kits, first aid stores, battery charging
Quarterly - Auto, Electrical and mechanical.
Half yearly- food stores.
Annual 100% inventory including all caches.
Or however you like to structure it?

Who has a training plan, for all the skills they aren't good at, or aren't as fun as shooting guns?

I don't think the military system serves survivalists in all ways. But I think their system of checks and drills are one area with direct benefit to streamlining, optimising and developing actual response ability. The good news is the checks only take a few minutes a month once you are used to them, they will streamline your entire inventory, you will know you can hit the road in an exact timeframe.

They also have other benefits, they ( bluntly) identify holes in procedures, they also pull the system closer together. For example rather than days of keyboard 'analysis paralysis' over whether to have 'XYZ item' in the bugout kit or the INCH kit, try loading everything under time pressure and you will find XYZ's place in the scheme of things( and about 100 other items) becomes much clearer...

And inventory checks don't just ensure you have the stuff, they ensure you are 100% familiar with what it is, its operation, how to inspect it, even minor repairs, and can recall and retrieve it instantly.

I have to admit I see a lot of expertise on the forums, but have been most surprised by the lack of conversation on the above... which indicates to me very few people are doing it? I could be wrong but that is how I am seeing it.

I also thought more folk would find these sort of fun to be honest. Not that I live to get the family out of bed in the middle of the night screaming "nuclear attack' but running a drill or even bugging all the way out to your BOL can be an exciting project , you get to actually play with your stuff and can even combine it with camping etc.

Last edited by sixtus; 12-06-2017 at 08:15 AM.. Reason: Modified to ephasize response times,
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Old 12-05-2017, 03:22 PM
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As with many other things in life, I think it is a matter of recognizing different levels of preparedness. For some, it is mostly accumulating the "known quantities" of supplies needed to ride out various types of events. For others, it involves practicing assorted skills at a hobbyist level, whether that is shooting or camping or gardening. Then, there are those who have made preparedness part of their lifestyle, which can mean living mostly off of their own crops and/or livestock, hunting and/or fishing and/or foraging while camping as the primary means of sustenance, etc. There may be some overlap, especially depending on environmental factors (location, season) and obligations (job, family,) but I suspect that most of the "consumer-grade" types would be unlikely to stick with a strict change of lifestyle without first getting their feet wet at the hobby level.
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Old 12-05-2017, 05:21 PM
Marjorie Marjorie is offline
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Every year in September (National Preparedness Month in the US), Food Storage Made Easy does a week of drills. The first several days are spent doing last minute preps, and the next 3 days different scenarios are sent out.

You can actually participate in them, or you can just think through the exercise.

They've been doing it for 8 years now I think. Everything from

"your spouse called and the Boss is coming to dinner. You can't go run to the store and need to come up with a dessert from your pantry" to

"Breadwinner loses his/her job" or "there's a chemical spill and all local water is contaminated"

to

"War! Mass riots, civil unrest, etc mean you need to bug in for 30 days"

It's an interesting exercise. Every time we work through it I find different things I hadn't previous thought about.

As to inventorying -- I keep a running inventory of LTS, pantry, and freezer food.

About once per year we inventory weapons/ammo.
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Old 12-05-2017, 05:51 PM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is offline
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Thank you for showing the fallicy of believing "your way" is the "only way"

I do not practice "bugging out"
But I keep a kit packed in the car (a couple actually) that I use.
I may be called out (Vol FD) any minute.
There's a rifle/mags between me and the door, and a bag with a weeks worth of clothing always packed (both a "house" and "woods" overnight bags in car.

I don't inventory annually or 2x annually.
I live here.

Today I needed high temp calk.
I went to my shelf where I keep calk, spray foam insulation etc and took it down.
Used it, replaced it, and made a note to buy more.

I recently opened another 8 lb bag of sugar.
I made a note to add another bag to the back end of the rotation...


I grow a garden, gather fruit, right now my house is being heated by firewood that I cut.
This week I'll probably be smoking a pig and canning it (where I'm going to PUT the canning jars I don't know....)

When I check the water levels in my houses battery bank tomorrow it won't be "prepping".... it's just "life"
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:16 PM
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:41 PM
Marjorie Marjorie is offline
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To go through your list point by point, though --

Quote:
Originally Posted by sixtus View Post
As opposed to just accumulating gear and cherry picking skills they enjoy?

1. One of the biggest questions to me is who has practiced an actual bugout drill? Done a timed scenario(maybe hurricane or tsunami incoming, mass riots, whatever) packed the vehicle, picked up the kids and wife and didn't stop timing until the vehicle hit the road or the house was bugged in or rucksacks were on backs? Who actually knows their response time, proven, for each?
Nope. The only 2 reasons we'd need to actually 'bug out' (evacuate) are house fire or massive nuclear radiation release. Both of those would be 'grab the keys and go'. No packing up the car first.

Nothing else happens here. No hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes, forest fires, or major earthquakes.

If we had evacuate ("bug out") in an EOTWAWKI scenario (grid down), we'd go to our cabin, which is fully stocked, and which we routinely go to.

Quote:
2.Who does inventory broken into periodic checks

Eg Monthly- Optics, weapons, kits, first aid stores, battery charging
Quarterly - Auto, Electrical and mechanical.
Half yearly- food stores.
Annual 100% inventory including all caches.
Or however you like to structure it?
Like Nomad said, it's life. It's not something we really do separately. I keep a running list because I want to know how to meal plan and use what we have. I have a list of LTS so that I know how much we have of what, and what I want to pick up next. So I don't get 3 years of black beans and one month of rice.

Quote:
3. Who has a training plan, for all the skills they aren't good at, or aren't as fun as shooting guns?
A training plan? I try every year to garden. Every year or so I try to pick up different skills than what I already have. This next year I want to join our state mushroom hunters club and learn about wild mushrooms. But a training plan? No. I can't say we have one.

I'm curious what your ideas for a training plan are, though.

BTW, I rarely shoot.

Quote:

4. Who just enjoys buying stuff online, putting together molle covered bags of items, accumulating gigs of survival downloads, shooting bottles at their buddies ranch, hunting 2 deer a year and calling it all 'prepping'?
I think you're hanging out in the wrong areas of the forum. I don't really buy stuff (other than books, but that's not stopping), I don't have a molle covered bag and don't even know how to use the molle bits of one, and don't go out shooting. Nor do we hunt.

But I still call us preppers.

Why? Because I try to prepare our family for whatever may come.

Dh and I have been unemployed most of the year. We haven't had to bug out at all. We have lived out of our pantry, cut our expenses to bare minimums, and, because we had a good amount in savings, have yet to miss a mortgage payment. Our cars are paid off and we have no consumer debt.

We have water stored but also have a 1500 gallon underground tank at our well that serves 3 houses. We can veges we get on sale or otherwise get super cheap.

Food, shelter, water.

I also haven't had to go camping at any point this year. We are not bugging out to a national forest.

I actually do have gigs of survival downloads, but that's because I happened upon CDs for the 3rd World (CD3WD). I felt an urgent need to download everything, and then felt really silly after it was done. Then I went back a week or so later and the site was down, never to come back. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD3WD

Quote:
, you will know you can hit the road in an exact timeframe.
Again though, there is more to prepping than seeing how fast you can leave your home.

Quote:
but running a drill or even bugging all the way out to your BOL can be an exciting project , you get to actually play with your stuff and can even combine it with camping etc.
I think this is where we differ. I don't have different 'stuff' just for bugging out. I use my 'stuff' in daily life. I know what it does, what its limitations are. I can catch things early.

For example, last week our water bath canner developed a small hole in the bottom. This week we replaced it. I didn't need to check inventory of it and inspect it, because it is in normal use.

I grind our flour multiple times per week. I know how my grinder works. I can take it apart and clean it and don't have to figure it out or fumble with it. Because I use it.

I'm not even sure what I would take to our cabin (BOL) that I haven't used on a regular basis. Maybe an Israeli bandage?

Maybe if you hang out more in the homesteading and food and water forums, you'd see that many of us don't have separate gear for 'bugging out' that we've compartmentalized.
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:46 PM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is offline
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https://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...8#post16881818

Marjorie:
I DO have "a bug out bag" in my truck, but it's the same bag that I'll grab, take a few things out of, and go walk in my woods with in the colder months (I don't in summer, I grab a smaller bag, but there's no cell service on much of my property, and if I break my leg in winter I want to not freeze etc...)

You don't need to inventory a bag your always getting into and using.
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:57 PM
sixtus sixtus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
Thank you for showing the fallicy of believing "your way" is the "only way"
Fallacy, not fallicy. Secondly its the militaries way, not mine, as stated.
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:58 PM
Kansas Terri Kansas Terri is offline
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No, I have not practiced bugging out. I am, however, living in a great bug-out location. I am too high to flood, the risk of fire is tiny, the neighborhood is quiet, and while Kansas City is West of us I consider the risk of a nuclear strike to be tiny. There are better targets that are easier to reach

Also, I have used my preps to help me deal with some of life's problems: most disasters are not city-wide but they are disasters even so. The pantry goes up and the pantry goes down. Right now I am considering taking advantage of the local Christmas sales to build the pantry up again. Canned tuna and chicken and beans store very well, and I suspect I am down to a half-dozen cans of each. I would also like a small turkey for the freezer, and right now they are 88 cents per pound.

Several years ago everybody lost power for days: I am far better prepared now. If I HAD to bug out we would grab the camping supplies, the critters, and some food and go but mostly we are AT our bug out spot.

The truth is, I am a poor prepper because I do not inventory stuff. It is possible that I am on my last container of salt, and I have been buying pet food one bag at a time because I am low on storage space. I am, however, a real prepper who has seen real problems In her life. I call them problems, not disasters, because when you are snowed in with preps it is easy to heat up soup and kick back: that is not a disaster at all regardless of what the news calls it. And I now have a kerosene heater and battery lights if the power should go out again.
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Old 12-05-2017, 07:17 PM
Lugh MacArawn Lugh MacArawn is offline
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I don't do most of that.

Yes, I have mapped out and traveled eight different ways to get out of the city and get to my retirement property, but I don't practice it. I did it to see if my maps were accurate just in case I ever had to do it for real. Yes, I have lists of things I would like to purchase and I have a few "accounts" I routinely put money into to purchase those things. And as soon as one of those things is purchased a new thing is listed to save for.

No, I do not go to the range and burn through $100s in ammo each month or even year. It is fun, but, time has shown me my shooting is adequate without devoting a bunch of time or money to it. I am no sniper or quick draw, I know it and I am okay with it.

I "rotate" my food, but I do not have the rotation listed in a book or a spreadsheet, I just replace things as I use them. Usually with one more than I used so I I am always increasing my stores.

I do not inventory or "check" my gear/kit because I use it frequently. I already know what is in my jump kit and/or backpack because I use them both at least once a month, sometimes as many as three times a month in my normal everyday life. As supplies become used, damaged or outdated they are replaced.

Caches? I have a few I have buried on/around my property, but have never dug them up to see if they are "good to go". If they are not disturbed then what I put in there is still there. I do have a storage locker, though. I "check" it three or four times (when I make payments) a year to make sure no vermin have gotten into anything and water bottles do not need to be replaced. But, other than that, no. I do not practice or "prepare". I see no reason to do that. I think that just adds to one's stress level. Just live your life, with the understanding that you think ahead to a time of doing without and don't like what you see.

I do not practice any skill sets. But, I try to learn how to do things I am interested in because I enjoy it. My best example is auto mechanics. I "know" I should learn how to do more. I am barely above neophyte level . But, I have little interest in actually working on cars and trucks. So, I put hardly any effort into learning to do so. Some would say that is detrimental to me and mine, and can not really disagree with that. But, I do not stress about it and I go on studying about different plants, animals, history, pre-history, cultures and simple mechanics/construction etc. Those are the things I enjoy learning about and working on.
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Old 12-05-2017, 07:18 PM
sixtus sixtus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marjorie View Post
To go through your list point by point, though --



Nope. The only 2 reasons we'd need to actually 'bug out' (evacuate) are house fire or massive nuclear radiation release. Both of those would be 'grab the keys and go'. No packing up the car first.

Nothing else happens here. No hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes, forest fires, or major earthquakes.

If we had evacuate ("bug out") in an EOTWAWKI scenario (grid down), we'd go to our cabin, which is fully stocked, and which we routinely go to.



Like Nomad said, it's life. It's not something we really do separately. I keep a running list because I want to know how to meal plan and use what we have. I have a list of LTS so that I know how much we have of what, and what I want to pick up next. So I don't get 3 years of black beans and one month of rice.



A training plan? I try every year to garden. Every year or so I try to pick up different skills than what I already have. This next year I want to join our state mushroom hunters club and learn about wild mushrooms. But a training plan? No. I can't say we have one.

I'm curious what your ideas for a training plan are, though.

BTW, I rarely shoot.



I think you're hanging out in the wrong areas of the forum. I don't really buy stuff (other than books, but that's not stopping), I don't have a molle covered bag and don't even know how to use the molle bits of one, and don't go out shooting. Nor do we hunt.

But I still call us preppers.

Why? Because I try to prepare our family for whatever may come.

Dh and I have been unemployed most of the year. We haven't had to bug out at all. We have lived out of our pantry, cut our expenses to bare minimums, and, because we had a good amount in savings, have yet to miss a mortgage payment. Our cars are paid off and we have no consumer debt.

We have water stored but also have a 1500 gallon underground tank at our well that serves 3 houses. We can veges we get on sale or otherwise get super cheap.

Food, shelter, water.

I also haven't had to go camping at any point this year. We are not bugging out to a national forest.

I actually do have gigs of survival downloads, but that's because I happened upon CDs for the 3rd World (CD3WD). I felt an urgent need to download everything, and then felt really silly after it was done. Then I went back a week or so later and the site was down, never to come back. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD3WD



Again though, there is more to prepping than seeing how fast you can leave your home.



I think this is where we differ. I don't have different 'stuff' just for bugging out. I use my 'stuff' in daily life. I know what it does, what its limitations are. I can catch things early.

For example, last week our water bath canner developed a small hole in the bottom. This week we replaced it. I didn't need to check inventory of it and inspect it, because it is in normal use.

I grind our flour multiple times per week. I know how my grinder works. I can take it apart and clean it and don't have to figure it out or fumble with it. Because I use it.

I'm not even sure what I would take to our cabin (BOL) that I haven't used on a regular basis. Maybe an Israeli bandage?

Maybe if you hang out more in the homesteading and food and water forums, you'd see that many of us don't have separate gear for 'bugging out' that we've compartmentalized.
Good post marjory, this thread applies less to competent homesteaders( which I do myself btw ) farmers, and other types of 'bug-inners'.

I should have addressed it more to bugouters and urban preppers, generally those moving out of high risk/population zones. I thought I put it in urban, not general disaster forum.
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Old 12-05-2017, 07:35 PM
hardcalibres hardcalibres is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sixtus View Post
Good post marjory, this thread applies less to competent homesteaders( which I do myself btw ) farmers, and other types of 'bug-inners'.

I should have addressed it more to bugouters and urban preppers, generally those moving out of high risk/population zones.
No one is completely prepared - so everyone is working towards being better prepared. In that context, how preppers prioritize what is done sooner and what later is always subjective and situational.

I know from some of your early posts that you decided to stock up on 22RF rounds rather than 223 or whatever (due to higher cost). That was an example of you assessing your situation and making a choice on priority - a choice upon which many here would disagree.....

If we accept that prepping is a lifestyle or life's work for many here, then there is nothing wrong with making some of prepping fun (for some that will be guns, others gadgets, others whatever). As long as the key capabilities are being addressed - so what?

A life without fun is not much of a life.

For the record, I am fit and relatively young for a member of SB and have the same background as you. Like you, I fall back on the principles the military taught me - including training and running drills (even though many here would suggest that running drills is "scenario prepping" - lol).

But I accept that not everyone has that background and for those who don't, they have little understanding of that culture.
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Old 12-05-2017, 08:14 PM
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I prep in layers, the more time I have, the more stuff I can get too and / or throw into the car. I keep a back pack, a case of bottled water, 6 cans of soup, 2 weeks of emergency rations call Survival Tabs, blankets and simple tools in the trunk of both mine and my wife's car. I can leave as fast as I can walk to the car, and survive for a week.

In another 5 minutes I can get more food and water, camping gear, solar panel, water filters, paperwork, cash, guns/ammo extra clothes and be gone. That will get me another 2 weeks

In 30 minutes, I can put the car topper on the roof and fill it with even more stuff. With 2 cars filled up, I figure we can do OK for a month. As long as we can get gas for the cars to keep moving.

I practice this in my mind on a regular basis, and store and organize my supplies for quick and easy access. I have spent many years bugging out for week end camping trips. It is fairly easy for me to do.
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Old 12-05-2017, 08:20 PM
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Really I'm not a prepper, more of a want-a-be due to #1 resistance form the "bosums of my family" & #2 said bosums being unable to go two days without going to town (13 miles away). However we have survived two 10 day power outages thanks to my insisting on having more canned goods than they want around,a gas stove and a generator. I do have "pioneer skills" & tools, but know we will not survive if the SHTF in a bad way. I'm mainly here to keep my thumb on the pulse of you who know whats going on in this country on a daily bases, thanks to you for being what ever you are.
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Old 12-05-2017, 08:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sixtus View Post
Fallacy, not fallicy. Secondly its the militaries way, not mine, as stated.
It's military's way, not militaries way.
You ought to stop it with the grammar nazi business. You're no good at it.
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Old 12-06-2017, 07:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revision View Post
It's military's way, not militaries way.
You ought to stop it with the grammar nazi business. You're no good at it.
Written spelling is not grammar. Grammar is sentence formation. You should stay out of the grammar Nazi business until you learn what the terms mean. Maybe ask Nomad for help.

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Old 12-06-2017, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hardcalibres View Post
No one is completely prepared - so everyone is working towards being better prepared. In that context, how preppers prioritize what is done sooner and what later is always subjective and situational.

I know from some of your early posts that you decided to stock up on 22RF rounds rather than 223 or whatever (due to higher cost). That was an example of you assessing your situation and making a choice on priority - a choice upon which many here would disagree.....

If we accept that prepping is a lifestyle or life's work for many here, then there is nothing wrong with making some of prepping fun (for some that will be guns, others gadgets, others whatever). As long as the key capabilities are being addressed - so what?

A life without fun is not much of a life.

For the record, I am fit and relatively young for a member of SB and have the same background as you. Like you, I fall back on the principles the military taught me - including training and running drills (even though many here would suggest that running drills is "scenario prepping" - lol).

But I accept that not everyone has that background and for those who don't, they have little understanding of that culture.
I can't disagree with anyones personal choices, some prep is better than no prep. Homesteaders, farmers and primitive technologists I also consider the top of the food chain.

I also just modified my post to be less emotive and also to emphasise the intent was regarding response times, not a criticism of preppers who don't use it.

I do find it surprising with all the conversations on being ready for worst case scenarios, which dominate a lot of the conversations here, so few people are interested in their actual response times.

Marjory above makes good arguments for her stable lifestyle and assumption no scenarios will occur requiring her to move in a way she is not prepared.

I'll put the following forward.

1. Worst case means you have to move. The perfect farm, location, raided by others, means its main purpose and careful layout is now someone elses benefit. Your purpose is leaving it with the most amount of equipment in the quickest possible timeframe, period.

2. Not checking inventory because 'you use it all the time', will produce fails, otherwise the military, medical community, firefighters, rescue operators would not periodically inventory their gear, they would just ' check by using it'.

3. Not practicing also produces fails. See above paragraph.

Again I am not advocating folks turn into military guys. I was suggesting a few minutes a month system of pracs and drills as used by response organisations would obviously have benefits for others looking to respond in timely fashion.

You have to admit significant portion of the sites bandwidth is about 'Bugout' but so few folks having an idea what their bugout response time is strange.
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Old 12-06-2017, 08:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad, 2nd View Post
Thank you for showing the fallicy of believing "your way" is the "only way"

I do not practice "bugging out"
But I keep a kit packed in the car (a couple actually) that I use.
I may be called out (Vol FD) any minute.
There's a rifle/mags between me and the door, and a bag with a weeks worth of clothing always packed (both a "house" and "woods" overnight bags in car.

I don't inventory annually or 2x annually.
I live here.

Today I needed high temp calk.
I went to my shelf where I keep calk, spray foam insulation etc and took it down.
Used it, replaced it, and made a note to buy more.

I recently opened another 8 lb bag of sugar.
I made a note to add another bag to the back end of the rotation...


I grow a garden, gather fruit, right now my house is being heated by firewood that I cut.
This week I'll probably be smoking a pig and canning it (where I'm going to PUT the canning jars I don't know....)

When I check the water levels in my houses battery bank tomorrow it won't be "prepping".... it's just "life"
Same here. I don't need to practice because I live it. One thing I do is an after event assessment. I have had hurricanes, ice storms, prolonged power outages, and even a 36 hour neighborhood lockdown while a mass murderer was on the loose. (This during the aftermath of a storm power outage.) So after these real events I do a review and make any additional adjustments.

My father trained me since birth to be aware of my surroundings and conscious of potential threats. Also to naturally be prepared. I can remember when we were ready to move out during the Cuban misled crisis as we lived in a high target area within range of the missiles in Cuba.

I've done a lot of vacationing in remote areas so having the ability to repair equipment, adjust to changes, adapt to the environment is/was part of those experiences.

As I'm sure you know living it makes these skills automatic. You respond to much without even consciously thinking about it. And you make better decisions for those you do need to analyze.
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Old 12-06-2017, 09:03 AM
KCChimneyman KCChimneyman is offline
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I do rotations of food stocks and water by using them and a few times a year get rid of things that are near "best by date", donating them to the homeless and then replacing them. We go to shooting range monthly and I use the oldest ammunition and replace it with new. Propane tanks are checked, rotated and refilled as they are used, gasoline and other fuel stocks are done in the same manner.
Our Bug Out/Get home bags are went through seasonally, the supplies kept in the vehicles are went through every month as part of vehicle maintenance.
We take a drive every Sunday, our time spent together with no distractions, and check the roads on our bug out routes, and see if any new oil or wind power roads were added that could be accessed if need be.
We also inventory and keep records of certain items, for insurance and peace of mind reasons.
Like someone else said, once you have been into the life long enough, one does not necessarily need excel spreadsheets, or fancy schedules because it has become routine and you do much without thinking, in other words, IT IS NORMAL EVERYDAY LIFE, like putting on your pants in the morning.
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Old 12-06-2017, 10:42 AM
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Jojo Jojo is offline
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I agree it's a way of life. I'm 57 and I was raised in the lifestyle, but I can understand how difficult it is for someone, lets say in their 30's just getting their families started, to prep.
We do have bug-out drills. Particularly in times of heavy traffic, got one coming up in just a couple weeks. We like weekend drives and hikes and use those to unwind as well as find alternate routes. We take advantage of unusual situations to learn/practice something new.
The last big winter storm Tulsa had, we learned to build an igloo. No it wasn't pretty, or big and it wouldn't have lasted a winter, but we now have hands-on experience and can do better next time.
We also learned in that storm that even though we don't have kids, we could use a couple of sleds. Bought them 50% after Christmas and they are stored on the garage ceiling along with the canoe we rarely use. We take it out several times a year just to keep up skills and at the same time practice water rescues. We both swim regularly at the gym.
My prepping motto has always been "slow and steady wins the race". Do what you can, when you can, it all adds up in the end.
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