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Old 02-22-2020, 06:10 PM
rob845 rob845 is offline
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So 3 years ago I moved from a very large city into an entire county that has less that 18k people... My city has less than 300 people alone...the move and change of life style was awesome we love it....

BUT I still have to drive back for work. And I always seem to need more tools of some sort sort of project, expensive tools I never thought of before. Before I moved I had sweet tools. I mean I have a welder, drill press, a plasma cutter and so much more... but as is the new normal apparently...I am still looking at needing more.

After buying a tractor, sooo many implements etc. For task that I had to get done.. I am looking at 2 more that add up to over another thousand...granted all of this is because we want to be self sufficient on our land..and I have used every implement many times..

So those that have moved from the city to the country how did you do it? Does the outflow of money ever stop? Were you ever able to quit you 9-5 and just work on your land?

I love where we are...I like the new people, but I want to stop the daily drive back. I want my land to provide, it is hard, I accept that. I guess I just need to see a light. And it does not help that I have literally started with a property that had a house to live in.... and NOTHING ELSE...

Sorry if this is a downer, I just would like to know people have done what I am doing, came out the other side and said **** ya! Now we are cooking!!!
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Old 02-22-2020, 08:01 PM
inMichigan inMichigan is offline
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You might look at this training material on homestead grain growing:
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/26...rowing.pdf?269

Go to the diagram on Page 14 and ask yourself... which 'farmer' is your long term goal?

I've seen a lot of people not clearly ask themselves that question before they starting buying equipment that turns out to be the wrong scale or wrong time period.

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Old 02-22-2020, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by inMichigan View Post
You might look at this training material on homestead grain growing:
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/26...rowing.pdf?269

Go to the diagram on Page 14 and ask yourself... which 'farmer' is your long term goal?

I've seen a lot of people not clearly ask themselves that question before they starting buying equipment that turns out to be the wrong scale or wrong time period.

inMichigan
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Old 02-22-2020, 08:29 PM
Grizzly Guy Grizzly Guy is offline
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My land didn't have anything on it except trees. I bought a lot of used tools but I know I will never have all the tools I need. I just get by with what I have and do what I can. I will improvise as I can or do without until the time comes that I must do something else. I found out I had to slow my pace and work harder doing more things by hand. I split 2 cords of firewood by hand, to secure the use of a backhoe I needed to place a culvert, just so I could drive into my property. Plant fruit and nut trees first, I lived in a tent, planting trees before I moved on to other things. I am half way done fencing 10 acres by myself, using a lawn tractor and a come along, hope to finish this spring.
I cut out all spending that wasn't for survival and only work about 2 months a year now, but I can almost guarantee you won't want to live that way. Most people will work till they die.
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Old 02-22-2020, 08:47 PM
workquik workquik is online now
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I bought my acreage for 30k. Since then over a 150k for cabin, driveway, fence, tools, improvements and preps including solar.

The trouble with building an off grid paradise is you can't get a conventional loan. Pure cash is what it took.

My advice though, don't spend your retirement funds to do it. If you don't have cash you really can't afford it.

Work hard and do it young. I did it at 60. 13 years later and now I'm old and arthritic. Could have and should done it in my fifties. At least it's ready for my children come shtf.
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Old 02-22-2020, 09:03 PM
John Galt 1 John Galt 1 is offline
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I've lived in a subdivision with HOA rules and out in the country with no neighbor's houses within sight. Living out in the country with some land is a hell of a lot more work than living in an urban area.

My place came with several outbuildings and a good driveway but hadn't been maintained in a few years. I already had an old tractor but I did end up buying a few implements. But now that I've been improving the place the last 5 years I've found that it's usually better to borrow from a neighbor or rent than to buy something that will rarely be used. And some things such as a post hole digger for the tractor got used so little I later sold them. For wire fencing it's about easier to use post hole diggers and you get a tighter post.

You can't do all of your projects in a year. Don't try to fence all of the property at first, Fence some now and a bit more later.

Find a slightly lower paying job closer to the house, that's what I did. Very few people can ever make enough off a small place (less than 300 acres) to pay all of the bills. I put a few cows out in the pastures. I read up on how to build honeybee swarm traps and now sell a bit of honey. Hopefully I'll also make some money selling bee nucs later this spring. We save a bit of money with chickens for meat and eggs. Growing some grapes and muscadines for making wine but because of all the weeding we still buy most of our vegetables. Lots of maintance required for the old apple trees and I've added a few more fruit trees. I average 55 hrs/wk at my regular job but it's only 10 minutes from the house and my wife works over 50 hrs a week but we've slowly improved the property to where it's actually pretty nice.

Just don't plan on a lot of TV watching or early suppers if you maintain a larger property.
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Old 02-22-2020, 09:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rob845 View Post
I had to get done.. I am looking at 2 more that add up to over another thousand...granted all of this is because we want to be self sufficient on our land..and I have used every implement many times..

So those that have moved from the city to the country how did you do it? Does the outflow of money ever stop? Were you ever able to quit you 9-5 and just work on your land?

I love where we are...I like the new people, but I want to stop the daily drive back. I want my land to provide, it is hard, I accept that. I guess I just need to see a light. And it does not help that I have literally started with a property that had a house to live in.... and NOTHING ELSE...

Sorry if this is a downer, I just would like to know people have done what I am doing, came out the other side and said **** ya! Now we are cooking!!!
Several ways to move from the city to the country. Many as I have seen on and off the net have some money coming in such as from govt checks. Military retirement pensions are the best and most common I have seen especially in real life. There are also social security and other kinds of income. I likely will begin receiving social insecurity checks in a year or so maybe I will wait until I am 65 but my luck the govt will run out of money or worse.

I have done and plan to do much more by working for neighbors with cabins, getting them firewood, doing odd jobs etc. Some will pay ten even twenty dollars an hour. And I have done barter also such as I worked forty hours cutting down mainly dead trees around a guy and his wife's cabin and received an ATV and a twenty year old Tuff shed plus a pickup truck of lumber.

Also depends on how fancy you wish to live and IF you can live on little money and do you really Need a fancy tractor or a cheaper one or know how to work with little and what you have available.

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Originally Posted by Grizzly Guy View Post
My land didn't have anything on it except trees. I bought a lot of used tools but I know I will never have all the tools I need. I just get by with what I have and do what I can. I will improvise as I can or do without until the time comes that I must do something else. I found out I had to slow my pace and work harder doing more things by hand. I split 2 cords of firewood by hand, to secure the use of a backhoe I needed to place a culvert, just so I could drive into my property. Plant fruit and nut trees first, I lived in a tent, planting trees before I moved on to other things. I am half way done fencing 10 acres by myself, using a lawn tractor and a come along, hope to finish this spring.
I cut out all spending that wasn't for survival and only work about 2 months a year now, but I can almost guarantee you won't want to live that way. Most people will work till they die.
I really like this post and I highlighted above what I have done for at least 30 years and still plan to do. I also will most likely have at least one guy help me this summer to get a Lot more done on my retreat which I hope to make into a wilderness like homestead. People have done what many of us dream of doing and it all depends on how fancy you need to be and live and how determined you are to get it done!

I have worked harder than at any job I have ever had and I have had several different kinds of jobs, mostly physical. BUT I would rather work real hard for myself than make a corporation richer and I also know that I am living more FREE than most can even ever imagine or understand!
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Old 02-22-2020, 09:26 PM
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Great post on a subject near and dear to my lifestyle. Fortunately, the old homestead I purchased came with all of the old school, non-powered tools the original homesteader used. It was a tough decision on what new stuff I needed to buy. Another fortunate thing, my only neighbors within many miles of me has tractors with all the attachments, D4 dozier and other useful items. I pay him $100 an hour for major yearly tasks, and we help each other for free for urgent/immediate tasks that pop up from time to time. This has saved me a ton and allowed me to focus my purchases with my modest budget.

As said above, learn to use what you have and then be strategic with what you need to purchase. Since itís a full tank of gas round trip to the nearest country hardware store, I did stock up on nails, wood screws, bolts, washers, nuts, brackets, hinges, springs, lumber, pulleys, rope, sheet metal, etc. Nothing worse than having to blow half a day and a tank of gas to go get basic items on the many projects and repairs needed on an old homestead. After doing this a few times, I took my trailer and $4,500 in cash and pretty much bought up half the country store!
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Old 02-22-2020, 10:42 PM
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Second hand(or tenth hand) equipment is one way to keep the expenses down. I have a lot of tools and equipment bought for scrap price that is from the 30's or 40's.

I also am good friends with a scrap dealer. I let him know what I am looking for and often he can find it for me in a couple weeks for scrap price or in trade for running his equipment for a couple hours to load his truck.

I also can often get the job done without the proper equipment.
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Old 02-22-2020, 11:11 PM
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When I retired I flipped houses for a few times. Not buying for 100K and doing some painting and selling for 110K, but buying houses that locals thought was ready for the bulldozer, and selling for 10 times what I paid.

I'm living my final place now, pretty much a preppers dream, water comes from a ditch and it flows to most of the property by gravity. Climate good for growing what I need on 10 acres. I built an earth sheltered house on the north side and full sun on the south. Big cellar. A nearly complete set of the tools I need. etc, etc.

Flipping a few houses took time, but it paid off well.
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Old 02-23-2020, 01:11 AM
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
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No.

It never stops.

I was BORN in the country and I'm still pouring out all the money that comes in as fast as it comes in into tools, buildings, etc.

Its just how we live out here.
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Old 02-24-2020, 06:19 AM
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Agree with post about making do, and doing without.

I got here (my current location) with a lot of tools from the previous property... Plus purchased some expensive goodies... And then... Thieves hauled everything away.

I'm not as fit as I used to be, a lot of that is never going to be replaced.

Still... With the winter cold... I needed to split some wood stashed away from previous years... Hatchet wasn't cutting it... Had an ax, no handle. Whittled one from a dogwood tree. Works great!

Shoved a dogwood sapling into a shovel head so that I could work on new garden beds...

Some things we need... Like wood for the fireplace and food in the garden.

My electric bill got over $50 in a month a couple times last summer... Ouch!

Really miss my solar setup I had going at my previous location...

I've known a lot of people that seem to have access to a lot of money... In comparison to what i'm bringing home from part-time employment... They never seem to have money when it comes to a pinch.

By putting off purchases... Thinking about whether I need an item (for years), I have $ when I need a to fix the truck... Ie emergency funds... And... I save for the big recurring bills... Insurance to drive.... Property tax.... Truck tires, dentist appointments....

In the meantime.... I mostly do without.... But... I have plenty of time to create garden space, and walk around and enjoy the acreage.

If you are blowing everything upfront in a mad dash to convince the property to start paying for itself... You may want to cool your jets, slow things down, and spend more time allowing your plans to percolate... Trying to rush things without having a firm grounding in what you are trying to accomplish... Can open us up to spectacular failure... Lot of people going bankrupt spending money that they didn't have.
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:08 AM
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Living in the country and being self sufficient is like a business. You always have an outgoing flow of money. You need to figure out a cost benefit analysis. If you pay $500 for an implement that fixes a $75 problem you have once then no. If it’s $75 3 times a year and done much faster then i would be all over it. One of those implements for me was a post hole digger/auger. Ever try to dig in rocky clay by hand? Now the auger breaks up stuff and makes the hole and I pull out the cuttings. Saves me 1-2 hours per planted tree which is about 40 of them so far with another 20-30 more this coming spring.
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:32 AM
wldwsel wldwsel is offline
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Think hard about tractor attachments and see if your neighbors would be willing to swap you time on their attachments for some time with yours. I bought a 48 inch rotary mower, used it twice in the woods and found it was too big to get into some places in the woods I wanted to clear. It has not be hitched for 10 years.

I bought a 36 inch DR tower, used it extensively for 12 years and it has sat in the shed for years. It did such a good job clearing, the brush has never come back through the pine needles.

The Front end loader gets used all the time, sometimes as a lift, but it and the tractor are the most useful things we have. I bought a 48 inch garden tiller which replaced the rotary mower on the back and rarely comes off. My neighbor and I both use it, and I use it to till a 20 foot firebreak around my burn pile.

Bottom line, we swap all kinds of favors around here to keep from having to buy stuff to use once or twice and then store.

WW

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Old 02-24-2020, 11:06 AM
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No one mentioned perseverance. You MUST keep moving forward even if you lose everything you have. Start over. And over again if need be. But PERSEVERE. It is a very long haul to being anything near self sufficient.

I am presently more self sufficient in some things and less so in others but I keep moving forward.

Buy used equipment, or if you need a specialty tool or piece of equipment see if it can be rented, either from a tool rental or neighbor. Don't buy it if you only use it once or once every few years. Pawn shops often have decent used tools for a fraction of the cost of new. Don't overlook them when you need a special tool.

Learn to do everything you can yourself.

Learn to do without some things. Example, it's not going to kill you if you have to do without coffee or internet or what have you for a while if it means you can fund something better for the long term. A little deprivation never hurt anyone but the weak.

And persevere!
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Old 02-24-2020, 12:58 PM
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You say new attachments for a task that had to get done. Did the task really HAVE to get done? Or did you just want it done? A person has to live within their means, are your sights maybe just to high?
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Old 02-24-2020, 01:59 PM
arleigh arleigh is offline
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Much if my investments in tools are in my shop trailer, but one important thing one must consider is whom are you leaving it to?
I don't know that my son or daughter have any interest in all my stuff nor any consideration for all that I have invested.
If I hand you $100. you will spend it like water ,but if you earn it you spend it more thoughtfully.
Rarely do people handed a fully sufficient survival BOL value it.
What is your goal? whom are you preparing for?
If you plan on having a family let them be a part of the process .
AS an example, my older brother basically had life handed to him and he had no interest in my dad's investments. I on the other hand worked with my dad very closely and we shared many of the same interests and the values of skills and making do, even making better.
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Old 02-25-2020, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtnman Mike View Post
Several ways to move from the city to the country. Many as I have seen on and off the net have some money coming in such as from govt checks. Military retirement pensions are the best and most common I have seen especially in real life.
I recently entered this category myself. I really need to start putting my new independence to good use, before it might be too late.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:47 PM
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I know several individuals and families who bought rural acreage and planned to "live off the land," but all of them have jobs now. I think it's very difficult if not impossible for most people to pull it off.

I have a situation that is the next-best thing to living off the land: I own and operate an Internet-based business. I run the business from my off-grid house on 30 acres in a remote location.

Note that it took about 20 years for me to build the business to the point where I could live the life I want. That kind of thing doesn't happen overnight unless you're very lucky.
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