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Old 08-24-2011, 02:22 PM
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I knit and crochet - it depends on what you want to make, as to which is better, and it depends on the person if they find one thing easier than another.

I sew some - haven't done so much this year. About a year or two ago I got a treadle machine off Freecycle and my husband put a new belt on it for me, but I still haven't used it yet.

As to knitting socks - I like doing them but as far as I'm concerned we're going to have to talk the guys out of liking black and dark grey for dress socks. I've got a pair going for dh and oh my is it ever killing my eyes!!

I spin a bit, but haven't messed with that for a while. There are just so many things to do!!

I've done a little basket making and hope to do some more soon - in fact I need to get some willow rods soaking soon so I can get a start. This is the kind:


A book I recommend, that has patterns for children from newborn up to age 7 or so, is
Little Clothes for Little People - out of print but you can still find copies. In order to use it you need dressmaking graph paper (or make your own). Some of their patterns combine knitting with sewing (a couple of dresses I think with knit tops and fabric skirts). Really quite nice.
Little Clothes for Little People (Crafts):... cover
Little Clothes for Little People (Crafts):...
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Old 08-26-2011, 01:26 AM
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We have a Singer 201 from the 1950's and a modern industrial Singer with a motor (guess which one we'll likely be using when SHTF). We have a lot of material, but most of it is SCA/costume stuff, which would be kinda awesome if we had to make all of our clothes out of it one day.
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Old 08-26-2011, 11:32 AM
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I personally love to crochet. The knots are a little further apart, so they make great dish cloths. This will make a great skill to have during hard times. But...knitting is also good for making sweaters and warm clothes.
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Old 08-26-2011, 12:35 PM
LadyFenix LadyFenix is offline
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The only clothing colors that guys want to wear (including socks) are black, brown, and grey. The exception to this are the colors used by their favorite sports team. (It's a guy thing, and they all do it.)

If you use any other color to knit something for them......it will be shoved to the back of their closet, or to the bottom of a dresser drawer) and not worn. It does NOT matter that it took you a year to knit that intricate pattern and you created it with love in every stitch.
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Old 08-27-2011, 12:42 AM
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I have an antique Singer treadle machine in addition to my "workhorse" Bernina. My "tip" for the treadle machine is to get a few extra belts for it--they're usually pretty durable, but if it breaks, you're hosed. You might also get an extra bobbin case or two (I do this for my Bernina, as well)--that way, if you are working with a much heavier bottom thread, or doing decorative stitching, you can adjust the "spare" bobbin case, WITHOUT screwing with your regular one. I mark my "spare" bobbin case with some nail polish so I don't get them mixed up. Also get lots of needles! In my experience, the needles are the "weak link", so have plenty on hand.

The treadle machine may not do "fancy" stitching, but absolutely can NOT be beat for a fine, straight seam, and in a power outage or "grid down" situation, you can STILL sew by machine. I do sew by hand, as well, it just depends on what I'm working on. I usually prefer to do my quilting by had, although I will do the piecing by machine, simply because it's faster. If it's a baby quilt that will get a lot of washing, though, I'll do that on the machine.

Knitting, however, is NOT something I do. My Mom tried to teach me, years ago, (she does a LOT of knitting and crocheting) but we both gave up in frustration.
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Old 09-07-2011, 09:10 PM
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Default Treddle do treddle don't

Hi ladies...After having the wife's new-fangled plastic POS sewing machine puke at the 3rd layer of jean material, I entered the world of vintage/antique sewing machines...Silly me...Here is some advice.
After doing a little research I settled on the Singer model 15-91, and the model 201, both of which have a "potted" gear driven motor" built into the machine and not belt driven. Being a gear freak, I bought one of each. The going rate on Ebay for a nice one is in the 125-175 dollar range for a unit with all the basic attachments (including shipping). Be patient and don't get in a bidding war. People seem to bid higher on a unit with attachments, so always look for a cheap machine, and get the attachments separately (if you get a deal on the machine. Try and get the NEWEST MACHINE POSSIBLE...Remember that a 1938 Vs a 1958 machine means one more generation of use. Look closely at the wiring, if the external wires look worn, the chances are great that the internal wires are sad also. If you settle for a different machine with an external motor, it will be much more evident as to the shape of the motor. Another point is the overall "look"of the machine...A nice shinny pretty one is usually in better shape, but the price will be higher.
If You run into one "locally" pull the housing on the motor...two small screws on top and bottom of the "Hump" on the side. If it is nasty in side you are looking at some work. A little black dust is OK, but a lot is not.
Now that you have your nice new machine, it is time to clean and oil it.
LOOK AT YOUR OWNER"S MANUAL FOR THE OILING POINTS. Down load a manual if your machine did not come with one...You will need it!!! While you are at it down load a SERVICE MANUAL AS WELL...
WARNING...THE SHINNY PAINT JOB WILL BE RUINED EASILY WITH SOLVENTS!!! Clean the outside with soap and water, and a soft rag. Now for the insides... Revove all of the covers and clean off all the lint. An air compressor makes quick work of this. Using several sizes of brushes is time consuming but totally doable.. Spend extra time on the bobbin and feed dog area. You will want to remove the bobbin holder for this. Now on to das parts workin...I use a product called Breakfree CLP Get a spray can and hit all the moving parts. This product did not hurt the finish, but wipe any excess off the outside immediately just in case... Use the tube...You get better control over where the oil goes. Let it sit for a few minutes and wipe all of the crud you can off all the moving surfaces, then reapply. Run the machine at low speed, re-clean, and run at a higher speed. If your machine is really gummed up, this may take a few passes...
Again, after the initial wipe down, an air compressor is worth it's weight in gold.
After you have the machine cleaned to your satisfaction, it is now time to apply the "Sewing Machine" oil. A product called TRI Flow is great. 3 in one Oil is marginal, at best... Hit every movement point with it. A couple of drops is all you need.
The next step with the built in motors is to pull the hand wheel, and clean and re-grease the gears...Here is where the owners manual comes in handy. Re-assemble and start adjusting the bobbin and top thread...Follow the "Book" it will take some finagling...Start to sew!

Now on to the treadle...All of the above applies...
Buy the table, not the machine. A good table with an acceptable machine will cost you between 100-200 dollars. Hit up craigslist...people are hocking them cheap. A treadle without machine can be had for about $50. Be shure to buy name brand specific, as the machine mounting hole can vary.
The most common machines do not have the reverse feed system, which can be a pain.
Here is where it gets good. Try and find a 66 machine with a spoke type wheel, it will have a bobbin that lays flat (horizontally) It will have a bobbin winder that actually has a spooling device similar to a fishing reel mounted at the top of the machine...Older machines have the bobbin winder mounted lower towards the base.... Do some Googleing here to become familiar with the different models.
There is a reason for this...You can use the parts off the 66 machine to treadle a 15-91 or a 201!!! Here's how...
Take the hand wheel off the 66. remove the hand wheel and motor assembly and plug from the 91/201. install the spoked wheel, and you are set, with a caveat...No bobbin winder... Now if you want the winder, and who doesn't, remove the winder from the 66...You will have to file out the mating surface to fit over the slightly larger shaft housing. Once the surfaces match, line everything up, and mark the screw position on the shaft housing and drill and tap a hole. This is easy. You will need the correct drill and both a starter tap, and a bottoming tap, and a small wrench... Go slowly here as you are dealing with cast iron. You will have to shorten the screw a little, or use some small washers. This job took me about an hour on a 201...I now have the smoothest treadle on the planet.

Now lets talk about the hand crank...If you have done all of the above, the hand crank (an Ebay item) will just bolt right on...
If all you want to do is install a crank...Unbolt the plug assembly, and move it to the side. Remove the hand wheel (the solid gear driven) and cut a notch in the outer rim. Bolt up the crank, and sew...You will be spinning the motor, and I would not suggest doing this for long periods. If you want a hand crank unit, remove the gear from the hand wheel, or better yet buy a second wheel and modify it, saving the old one for days with electricity. about $15 bucks on ebay + shipping. It takes about 5 minutes on a slow day to convert back and forth.
Now some final thoughts...
You can buy an external motor off Ebay, and attach it to your treadle modified unit, and have the best of all 3 worlds.
The bobbin winder for a 66 can be bought for about $25 This will keep the old machine intact.
The spoked wheel and crank run about $45 on ebay. So if you find a nice table with no machine, just convert a 201...The singer Model 201 will spoil you.
It has been said by others that the 15-91 will handle slightly thicker thread than the 201, due to the design of the bobbin holder...If you have modified a 66 winder, you will have to use class 66 bobbins. My 91 dose so with no problems...
There ya go...All I know

Oh yea, then there is the 401...Check it out...What a machine!!!
Yes, I am working on a treadle conversion for one of those also, but am still in the planning stage!!!...Enjoy
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Old 09-08-2011, 01:03 PM
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I am so glad that I happened upon this thread. It is right up my alley. I really enjoy sewing, quilting, crocheting, knitting, embroidery, cross stitch, anything that is handwork. I have a "stash" of fabric. It is called my sewing room. Every time I return from the thrift store or yard sale with bags of yarn or fabric, my poor husband just rolls his eyes as I head to the back of the house to my little sanctuary (too bad I have to do ironing and laundry in the same space!). I truly believe these skills are just as important as gun skills and cooking skills. These are wonderful skills for bartering. I barter for things now. I am currently making a custom apron for a neighbor who swapped me an old coffee grinder that will grind corn and beans. Works out well for both of us.

It is also our responsibility to teach these skills to the next generation. As you can tell by my screen name, I have no daughters. All of my sons, except for my disabled son, know how to sew simple clothing items and household goods. They know how to bake, they know how to do home canning and they can cook well enough not to starve. My father and my brother both have their own sewing machines and use them frequently. I have a serger and two sewing machines, three if you count my vintage treadle. I have yarn, fabric, batting, crochet hooks and knitting needles in many sizes. I have a big box of embroidery thread. I have tons of thread and needles, bias tapes and ribbons and elastic. These things will be so beneficial to all of our prepping efforts.

Thank you again for this forum. I look forward to reading about more folks like us.
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Old 09-08-2011, 02:52 PM
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I did a little fiddling today... I have my rant on conversions also running in the general discussion section...Check it out, and you will see my solution(s) for treadling up the singer 401 and it's cousins...
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Old 09-08-2011, 07:26 PM
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This is to good...I am going to buy a God Load...
http://www.mushycat.com/wiki/index.p...dles.VeganBelt
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Old 09-09-2011, 12:31 AM
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Does anyone do card (aka tablet) weaving?
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Old 09-20-2011, 05:09 PM
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Hi ya'll. I'm new to the forum and just found this thread. I am a quilter, knitter, spinner and since last year learning how to weave. I have enough yarn, fabric and rovings in my stash to last forever. LOL. My favorite thing is knitting socks. I am a little slow but have gotten faster since I started using two 24 inch circulars. Excited to be here.
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Old 09-25-2011, 04:29 AM
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Don't treadle on me.

I know what you mean, Survivalist. I have 2.5 boxes of yearn in all kinds of colors and 'tightnesses'. I need to learn how to knit though, I just crotchet so far.
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Old 09-29-2011, 05:15 PM
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The wife came home a while back with a compact spinning wheel that she got for dirt...I kinda shook my head since the only thing we have with hair is our old dog. She has a lot of it and we get enough out of her every brushing to make a small rat dog. HOWEVER she is one of those dogs that just flat out reeks no matter what we try. So I just had to ask what she intended doing with it...
Her answer make yarn out of plastic grocery bags with it. Prior to the wheel she was using a drop spindle, but the wheel does a faster/better job...She cuts them into strips about 1.5 inches wide, chains them together and runs them through the wheel. She made a Garlic bag about the size of a 5lb orange bag. Best onion sack I have ever seen. Very strong and durable. Now we have a use for all those plastic shopping bags (especially since we have a problem remembering the "Green" bags we bought when we grocery shop.) So ladies...Google up Plarn...
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Old 09-29-2011, 08:23 PM
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Ok, have been asking around and I knew there was a way to remove the "wet dog smell" from dog wool...

Spin it, knit/crochet it, then wash it in cold water with HUMAN SHAMPOO and then HUMAN CONDITIONER.

All the stink will be gone, and it won't come back. It's a bacteria in the fur that causes the smell, the human cleansers kill the bacteria leaving behind fresh non stinky "wool".



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Old 10-03-2011, 03:46 PM
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I would totally love to have a treadle sewing machine. I remember my grandma had one and I would sit under her playing, had to be quick LOL!

As for me, I am a quilter, crochet a little and just made my first pair of knit socks =) I taught myself off of the internet, so cool all the different things you can find on the net. I've made clothing for my kids when they were younger, I've fallen away from that but am trying to get back into it especially for clothing for my daughter. I'm currently looking for patterns I can adjust for her or how to make patterns out of her current clothing without taking them apart.

One thing I have to get used to is the seam allowance, in quilting it's a quarter inch, in clothing I know it's bigger but my eye is trained at the 1/4 inch mark LOL
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Old 10-04-2011, 08:08 PM
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Default Knook knit

Quote:
Originally Posted by dethmaul View Post
Don't treadle on me.

I know what you mean, Survivalist. I have 2.5 boxes of yearn in all kinds of colors and 'tightnesses'. I need to learn how to knit though, I just crotchet so far.
If you know how to crochet you can be knitting like a pro in about 5 minutes with the new leisure arts knook (sold at Walmarts everywhere).I bought mine just 3 weeks ago and have made 4 pairs of fingerless gloves one regular gloves 2 pairs of socks leg warmers for my dancer and wow if you are into amigurumi ( the Japanese knit or crochet stuffed animals ) I made a full set of angry bird stuffed toys and a set of farm animals and 4 dolls and a 'sock' monkey. It is incredibly easy to knit in a round with them so you dont have the turning issues of one row of knit and one row of pearl to keep it all knitting on one side an pearl on the other and cable knit designs are easy !!!
All that difficult pattern design is fairly easy. Right now it only comes in 3 sizes I'm hoping they expand to smaller and larger gauges.
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Old 10-17-2011, 04:04 PM
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I sew (and have the pile of fabric to prove it, LOL) and I can also make patterns and "drape on the form", or make things up in 3-dimensions. I don't knit or crochet because I never learned how. My machine is a 1984 Kemore which is mostly metal and so far I have had no problem getting parts for it. I do find that it gets harder and harder to find good fabric. Has anyone else had this problem?
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Old 10-17-2011, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zenscreamer View Post
I sew (and have the pile of fabric to prove it, LOL) and I can also make patterns and "drape on the form", or make things up in 3-dimensions. I don't knit or crochet because I never learned how. My machine is a 1984 Kemore which is mostly metal and so far I have had no problem getting parts for it. I do find that it gets harder and harder to find good fabric. Has anyone else had this problem?
All depends when and where you shop. I tend to buy a lot of things in whole bolts which brings the price down and the quality up.



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Old 10-17-2011, 05:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Synn View Post
I would totally love to have a treadle sewing machine. I remember my grandma had one and I would sit under her playing, had to be quick LOL!

As for me, I am a quilter, crochet a little and just made my first pair of knit socks =) I taught myself off of the internet, so cool all the different things you can find on the net. I've made clothing for my kids when they were younger, I've fallen away from that but am trying to get back into it especially for clothing for my daughter. I'm currently looking for patterns I can adjust for her or how to make patterns out of her current clothing without taking them apart.

One thing I have to get used to is the seam allowance, in quilting it's a quarter inch, in clothing I know it's bigger but my eye is trained at the 1/4 inch mark LOL
*******************

Standard seam allowance measurement for clothing is 5/8". Take a look at the area where the presser foot is. The majority of sewing machines will have lines engraved on that metal plate (with the hole for the needle in it) with 5/8", etc. measurements indicated. Very easy to just align your fabric against the measurement line that you need and then start sewing.
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Old 10-18-2011, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightShadow View Post
I got the sock knitter loom. I've been practicing on this because I couldn't do the DP needles either. It is adjustable and you can (supposedly) make socks from baby size to adult.

I have to find me one of those! I love it.
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