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Old 05-29-2020, 12:48 AM
OlddanTrucker OlddanTrucker is offline
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Is the Oregon coast a good place to bug out? You have lots of trees for cover and PLENTY of water available and the temps are not crazy extreme. If you can survive the rain I think it would be a blessing to be there. What kind of tools would you recommend since it's different then inland desert areas. For one thing no worry about snakes or poisonous creatures and like I said you won't have to compete for water!

Do you think the north Coast or south coast is better? The south coast is mostly small towns (with Coos Bay being the largest?) where there isn't crazy amounts of people and still lots of natural resources and to me plenty of hiding places while you can go get supplies without so much police or guards.

The north coast I think has taller mountains such as Saddle Back/Mary's Peak though but I could be wrong. Are the coast range mountains pretty much the same elevation throughout till you get to the Shasta mountain range? The north is more populated but has more services. Mostly Portland goes there.

What's your take on Oregon Coast bug out? I've notice nobody from the coast posts here so I'm curious how y'all feel about it due to the remoteness of things and unique challenges compared to inland Oregon.

How come neutral people are the most open minded these days it seems? If your part of a political party your stuck thinking one way about things.
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:18 AM
kmech kmech is offline
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Personally No frigg'n way. First off is the probability of the San Juan De Fuca giving way and flooding the entire area west of I5 of Oregon and second is the new Oregonian political scene. Yes beautiful drive on the 126 from about Eugene into the central area of the state and down through Sisters. But they've had some recent geologic movement in the Cascadia Range. I'd give oregon a pass on the western edge and maybe consider the eastern part near the Idaho border
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:52 AM
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Along the Oregon coast there is large areas of fertile soil, plenty of rainfall, so you don't have to generally irrigate crops. It is also generally well forested so firewood is not usually an issue. Deer/elk generally thrive there. The rivers have good runs of salmon, smelt. etc.. Streams there often have large trout populations. Pacific ocean coastlines in Oregon give you ample opportunity to catch salt water fish, tidal pools often contain edible seafood, many areas have abundant shellfish & clam digging. Just to mention a very few survival related things about that area.

I own some well forested property near Coos Bay, OR., within 2 miles of the ocean.
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Old 05-29-2020, 02:23 AM
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Personally No frigg'n way. First off is the probability of the San Juan De Fuca giving way and flooding the entire area west of I5 of Oregon and second is the new Oregonian political scene. Yes beautiful drive on the 126 from about Eugene into the central area of the state and down through Sisters. But they've had some recent geologic movement in the Cascadia Range. I'd give oregon a pass on the western edge and maybe consider the eastern part near the Idaho border
How dangerous would it be, then, to be potentially downwind of Hanford?

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Old 05-29-2020, 03:57 AM
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I worked a job near newport and during winter it rains hard. Like so hard we wore earplugs when in conexes. Tried to sleep in truck once and couldn't, too loud from rain hitting. Some pretty high winds, too. This is not all the time but you need good shelter.
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Old 05-29-2020, 04:12 AM
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How dangerous would it be, then, to be potentially downwind of Hanford?

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No serious concern, as it was decommissioned years ago.

Read up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanford_Site
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Old 05-29-2020, 09:03 AM
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Do you want to buy bug out property? or do you plan on hiding and living off of places you can find? How much of the land along the coast is either state or national park? BLM land? When times get tough, people are usually quicker to bring out their 12 gauge.
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:20 PM
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No serious concern, as it was decommissioned years ago.

Read up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanford_Site
I read somewhere that in a large EMP situation, if a nuclear power plant can't shut down correctly, and it's back up generators are disabled, it can become something akin to Fukushima.

Can't black start the plant without an active grid connection.

This is what I was worried about.

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Old 05-29-2020, 01:33 PM
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Where do you think all those Californians plan on going ? My family had a place outside sisters late60s early 70s all the locals were cussing Californians back then doubt its improved.
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:35 PM
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There was a time when the Oregon Gold Beach, Rouge river area was a destination hot spot for independent types. I just don't know if that's true anymore. Although it is a nice area, I just don't know if putting up with the political climate would be worth it. Oregon has changed quite a bit (politically) with then major cities along the I-5 corridor calling the shots.
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:18 AM
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I worked a job near newport and during winter it rains hard. Like so hard we wore earplugs when in conexes. Tried to sleep in truck once and couldn't, too loud from rain hitting. Some pretty high winds, too. This is not all the time but you need good shelter.
What about being a bit inland where mountains block the high south winds part when we have those deep lows? Lately the storm track the last few years have been in Washington. Washington has been the 'Old' Oregon weather patterns lately.
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:20 AM
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Where do you think all those Californians plan on going ? My family had a place outside sisters late60s early 70s all the locals were cussing Californians back then doubt its improved.
Shows more of the 'maturity' or lack of on the locals part. California is big. Northern is WAY WAY different then southern. Southern is the part you should worry about and even then their are striking contrasts between Los Angeles and outside where the homeless problems rapidly start diminishing.
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:21 AM
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There was a time when the Oregon Gold Beach, Rouge river area was a destination hot spot for independent types. I just don't know if that's true anymore. Although it is a nice area, I just don't know if putting up with the political climate would be worth it. Oregon has changed quite a bit (politically) with then major cities along the I-5 corridor calling the shots.
Do you think it would be hard to maintain a lock down on the coast where there are few police officers to begin with (outside of city control?) I mean how often does a high speed chase on the coast happen? When was the last time you heard a major police chase on the coastline?
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:25 AM
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in a true RWOL event... or even a partial RWOL... being rural likely means less contact from distant official government.. and likely more local (think Sherrif) control... so I think it really comes down to knowing the political leanings of your local officials...

There are lots of places in California and Oregon that are "red"....

In an event, most Californians aren't going anywhere. Why? There just isn't enough road capacity to handle all of them trying to travel at once.

CA's only major highway North/South is Hwy 5 and it will quickly be frozen shut just from the overwhelming amount of vehicles. The window to leave could even be smaller depending on what type of event everyone is fleeing from.

IMHO, most will stay put.

I would think rural Northern CA or rural Oregon would be decent choices for permanent BOL's. The only criteria they may not meet is the political ideology one. But as I said... There are lots of places in California and Oregon that are "red".... and typically they are the most rural.

There is an area in Northern CA called "the Lost Coast" that I'd move to in a heartbeat. Pop density is extremely low. Surrounded by forest. No major highway access. Mediterranean climate.
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Old 05-30-2020, 05:28 AM
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I grew up in the high desert of Eastern Oregon. I remember my dad taking for a 4 day vacation on the Oregon coast when I was 5. I had a dream that that a Tsunami though at the time I had no idea what a Tsunami was came. I was standing on the beach looking out over the ocean and I noticed a vibration in the sand under my feet and a low rumble coming from the ground. As I watched out in the ocean I could see something moving toward the land.

As the wall of water got closer the rumbling under my feet got stronger and I then see what it was, it was a gigantic friggin wall of water coming fast. I was so terrified I froze, in a few seconds I could feel a strong wind and saltwater stinging my face and and arms and the sand was shaking so hard by then my feet were sinking into the sand. It was crazy terrifying as I knew there was no running from it, it was just going to be the end....

The instant before the water hit me I was suddenly in the air above the wave looking down on it with a presence you could call "god" or whatever. I was crazy relieved that I was saved but also feeling really guilty because I knew everyone else would die. I watched that wave crash over the land and clear up into the mountains and then I thought to myself the worst is over now... The being/entity whatever with me then spoke in my mind and told me that the worst had just begun... I immediately understood why as the water began to rush back down the mountains toward the ocean ripping up everything as it went...

I had that dream every night we were there. I was in high school before I ended up staying at the beach again and every night I was there I again had that dream...

Call me crazy, but you couldn't pay me enough money to live on the Oregon coast... I will stick to the mountains of Idaho a good 3,000 feet or more above sea level thank you...
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Old 05-30-2020, 10:35 AM
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Default Oregon coast survival

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Originally Posted by OlddanTrucker View Post
Is the Oregon coast a good place to bug out? You have lots of trees for cover and PLENTY of water available and the temps are not crazy extreme. If you can survive the rain I think it would be a blessing to be there. What kind of tools would you recommend since it's different then inland desert areas. For one thing no worry about snakes or poisonous creatures and like I said you won't have to compete for water!

Do you think the north Coast or south coast is better? The south coast is mostly small towns (with Coos Bay being the largest?) where there isn't crazy amounts of people and still lots of natural resources and to me plenty of hiding places while you can go get supplies without so much police or guards.

The north coast I think has taller mountains such as Saddle Back/Mary's Peak though but I could be wrong. Are the coast range mountains pretty much the same elevation throughout till you get to the Shasta mountain range? The north is more populated but has more services. Mostly Portland goes there.

What's your take on Oregon Coast bug out? I've notice nobody from the coast posts here so I'm curious how y'all feel about it due to the remoteness of things and unique challenges compared to inland Oregon.

How come neutral people are the most open minded these days it seems? If your part of a political party your stuck thinking one way about things.
One November I drove from Coos Bay to Roseburg and thought the Coast Range there would be a nice place to live. Most of the Coast Range north of 26 is nice, and even crossing the Columbia into Washington's coast range is nice.
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Old 05-30-2020, 10:39 AM
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Personally No frigg'n way. First off is the probability of the San Juan De Fuca giving way and flooding the entire area west of I5 of Oregon and second is the new Oregonian political scene. Yes beautiful drive on the 126 from about Eugene into the central area of the state and down through Sisters. But they've had some recent geologic movement in the Cascadia Range. I'd give oregon a pass on the western edge and maybe consider the eastern part near the Idaho border
Eastern Oregon is high desert plains--hot and dry in the summer and cold in the winter.
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Old 05-30-2020, 10:58 AM
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Shows more of the 'maturity' or lack of on the locals part. California is big. Northern is WAY WAY different then southern. Southern is the part you should worry about and even then their are striking contrasts between Los Angeles and outside where the homeless problems rapidly start diminishing.
If you are really serious, you might want to check out the only area in Idaho that is not growing very much, according to census records, no interstate nearby, is fairly low in elevation, with elevation 400 feet to 5,000, precipitation 15 to 35 inches, contains three large rivers, one being the largest tributary to the Columbia, very politically conservative, has 3 universities, and probably the lowest snowfall in the state. Lots of deer, elk. Occasional black bear, cougar. Wild apple and wild cherry plums all over. And most people own guns.
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Old 05-30-2020, 11:10 AM
LuniticFringeInc LuniticFringeInc is offline
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Having spent some time there in the PNW....there are a few things that would and did seriously concern me.

Earthquakes. Yeah they dont happen often and when they do they are usually quit minor...but if you ever have a good one, your likely gonna be screwed for several months to come before things can get back to normal. Think about the major though way in Oregon....I-5. How many bridges and over passes cross it that could collapses in a earthquake? How is food, and gas gonna get to the area.

Volcano's! There are a lot of them there. Most are domant or have been for a majority of the time. But Mt Saint Helens has a dome thats building and releases steam and ash from time to time. Whats gonna happen to that area if it erupts again like it did in the 80's. A volcano blowing its top and spilling ash is just one of many issues, what about the Lahars that will follow it. If you look at some place like Washingtons Seattle-Tacoma area...they are all built on lahars from past eruptions. What is Seattle gonna do if Mt Rainier decides to let go?

To go with that and Earthquakes...if your west of I-5, you are probably going to be affected by any Tsunami's that occur. Study the geographical history of that area. There have been many serious Tsunami's in the area just not any recently. But if your there when one happens its gonna be devastating. Watch the video of Fukashima Japan sometime...I lived in Japan too for about 15 years!

Landslides and mud slides are pretty common to the area and when they block roads, it can really create quite the situation for you. That area gets a lot of rain and the ground is usually quite saturated all the time. It doesnt take much of a rain event to start hearing reports of mudslides and landslides.

Another thing you see a lot of in the PNW is ecoterrorism. Its not at all uncommon for folks to be building their dream house or other delvelopment there in the country side and have it burned to the ground in the middle of the night half way through the construction. A lot of towers there are sabatoged, a lot of fires are started there in the name of saving the environment.

Nor should you over look the weed growing (marijana - lots of grow ops there in addition to licensed legal grow ops), Lots of Meth and tweekers, Herion abuse is rampant and prescription pain killers are quite common there among the population. I ralize this happens in many places but not to the extent I saw it there!!!

Its a beautiful place to be sure. It has a lot to offer. But every rose has its thorns. Just make sure you can address them! They can be pretty epic if any of these occur. Remember too that area is very liberal minded as well and that too could create some challeges for you as well.
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Old 05-30-2020, 11:15 AM
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Oregon coastline + Cascadia Fault = nuff said.

Also OR and WA have rushed to turn themselves in CA.
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