Idea's wanted for a truck flatbed conversion. - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-15-2020, 08:10 PM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Montananistan.
Posts: 8,060
Thanks: 10,627
Thanked 22,165 Times in 6,403 Posts
Default Idea's wanted for a truck flatbed conversion.



Advertise Here

One of the projects on my wish list is to convert my 2000 Tundra into a flatbed, utility bed vehicle. The bed is already bashed up so its no great loss and I've always wanted a flatbed based truck. This will be a homebuilt custom project so it doesn't matter if no commercial version exists.

From a prepping point of view, what kinds of things would you want to incorporate into the design?

There are so many possible styles I'm have trouble deciding where to start with the design.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-15-2020, 08:47 PM
charliemeyer007's Avatar
charliemeyer007 charliemeyer007 is offline
reluctant sinner
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rent Free in your head
Posts: 15,632
Thanks: 34
Thanked 28,943 Times in 10,148 Posts
Default

Rail pockets, so you can fence in a load or not. Aux tank(s) for more gas without carrying cans. Hitch mounted winch with fixed cables front and rear so you can use it at either end.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to charliemeyer007 For This Useful Post:
Old 05-15-2020, 08:53 PM
hawgy54's Avatar
hawgy54 hawgy54 is offline
Goat Roper
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: TX
Age: 63
Posts: 1,083
Thanks: 4,943
Thanked 1,889 Times in 719 Posts
Default

I would just remove old bed and hit wrecking yards for a used flatbed. Instead of starting from scratch. You can modify it however. For me, toolbox and extra fuel are imperative, but thats just me. You prolly want it to haul stuff, so I dont know what extras you might want other than a sturdy flatbed.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to hawgy54 For This Useful Post:
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-15-2020, 09:45 PM
Sailorsam's Avatar
Sailorsam Sailorsam is offline
democrats = Hydra
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 6,038
Thanks: 15,270
Thanked 10,088 Times in 3,815 Posts
Default

that was a thing down home in the 1980s with old pickups.
the place I worked did that and installed an air compressor for tire repair. (spent nights in the shop)

they had their uses
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Sailorsam For This Useful Post:
Old 05-15-2020, 10:15 PM
cannonfoddertfc's Avatar
cannonfoddertfc cannonfoddertfc is offline
Sheepdog in Wolf clothing
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: PNW
Posts: 2,300
Thanks: 4,045
Thanked 5,161 Times in 1,662 Posts
Default

If this is a recovery/shop vehicle or a utility/farm vehicle, I recommend a vise. Doesn't have to be too big but the ability to hold something steady in the field is very handy.

I had one that went into the receiver but it was too low. The older I get, the less I like working bent down. One up at bed height is fantastic.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to cannonfoddertfc For This Useful Post:
Old 05-15-2020, 10:42 PM
AFF's Avatar
AFF AFF is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 900
Thanks: 338
Thanked 646 Times in 351 Posts
Default

I have a small pickup that is my gas getting truck and I had to put a flatbed on it. I was rear ended by a kid not paying attention while driving. Could not find a bed anywhere so I built one. I used 4x6 crossbeams with stainless steel lag bolts attached to the frame. Then attached pressure treated deck boards to the 4x6 boards. To prevent sagging under load I ran a treated 2x4 across the middle.

I installed 6 anchor points 2 in the front 2 in the middle and 2 at the rear.

I found a set of the grote tail lights - the style you see on dump trucks and f650 or larger trucks. Those only set me back about $20 for the pair and they are bright! For the turn signals I wanted them separate so I just used regular square trailer lights.

Kept the factory bumper for now. I have pulled trailers with it and weekly load my zero turn straight onto the bed and transport it around.

Before the bed was started I cleaned all that I could really well. A little inspection for rust and such is way easier also. Go ahead and replace your shocks.

Looking back it was the best thing I ever did with my small truck. I can haul so much more and it’s so much easier too. I get better gas mileage now also. Getting between 22-24 mpg (depends on how I drive and what I have on the bed)

I have used it to haul all kinds of things now and I love it!! It’s wood so the boards are easily replaceable if needed and I can attach things pretty quick and easy if I want. I can add storage, an air compressor, gas tank, or anything so easily now!!
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AFF For This Useful Post:
Old 05-15-2020, 10:56 PM
Ronald_55 Ronald_55 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 133
Thanks: 11
Thanked 181 Times in 74 Posts
Default

I would suggest adding a cab height front with some thing like expanded steel to protect the glass. Sucks to gave a 2x4 shatter it when you have to brake hard. Additionally you can mount lights on it. If you want to get fancy make it so you can turn them to front or back. Loading and unloading at night is so much easier if you don't have other lights.

I second stake pockets too. Flatbed is nice... until you want to haul gravel or loose dirt.

If you intend to use this as a possible bov too, watch for an old camper top and rig it up so it can attach to the top of the side boards. If you have to head out, it gives you some shelter if you end up needing to stay in the truck. I have one that is too big for my old truck bed, but a strip of diamond plate down each side fixed that. I found some guy giving the top away so I have nothing but a bit of time and scrap in it.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to Ronald_55 For This Useful Post:
Old 05-15-2020, 10:58 PM
Big_John's Avatar
Big_John Big_John is offline
That'll be the day...
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Somewhere in the West
Posts: 2,687
Thanks: 546
Thanked 10,775 Times in 2,224 Posts
Default

You have the Tundra that is really a mid-sized truck, one which I have always wanted.

But, you are going to have to be careful how much weight you add to this truck, as it is not a 3/4 or 1 ton truck. An extra fuel tank, a wench, a vice, etc. are going to drastically diminish your hauling ability.

I can weld aluminum... so that is the route I would go.

.......
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-15-2020, 11:26 PM
Aerindel's Avatar
Aerindel Aerindel is offline
Abnormality biased.
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Montananistan.
Posts: 8,060
Thanks: 10,627
Thanked 22,165 Times in 6,403 Posts
Default

1700lb payload capacity for what it’s worth. And I have airbags on mine too so thats what I have to work with.
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-16-2020, 12:51 AM
[_]ni/\/\og's Avatar
[_]ni/\/\og [_]ni/\/\og is offline
Amat victoria curam
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Tennessee/Ft Campbell
Age: 43
Posts: 1,326
Thanks: 413
Thanked 2,401 Times in 903 Posts
Default

https://dasmule.com/products/norweld...1st-gen-tundra


Seen a few like this at the overland expo.. not as popular here but the Aussie guys seemed to be into them.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to [_]ni/\/\og For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 02:01 AM
Central Scrutinizer's Avatar
Central Scrutinizer Central Scrutinizer is offline
CULT DEPROGRAMMER
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 4,298
Thanks: 4,743
Thanked 4,130 Times in 2,174 Posts
Default

Tie down cleats of some sort so you can quickly tie down odd items. I built a plywood deck inside an E350 van and put "T" nuts all over it so I could screw in 1/4 eye bolts that had a washer welded on wherever I needed a tie down for bikes, tents gear bags etc, using bunji cords.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Central Scrutinizer For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 05:34 AM
cook's Avatar
cook cook is online now
Survivor
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 3,544
Thanks: 3,868
Thanked 5,314 Times in 2,036 Posts
Default

I work at a construction supply warehouse,load about 50 trucks a day,I think I've seen every different configuration of trucks you can think of.
My heart goes pitter-patter when I see a flatbed,so easy to load.
Just my personal experience,but I agree with as many tie down points you can have.
Also,cut outs or 2x4 brackets so you can add sides and tail if needed.
I've noticed a lot of newer trucks have a sliding back window,thats handy for longer items,but some type of protection between the bed and cab is a must.
If you have a choice of heigth,just below your nipple line is easy to load/unload,or use as a work area.
Not sure what you will make it from,but a slick/smooth surface makes life easier...those textured liner really suck for sliding things around.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to cook For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 06:29 AM
JDH's Avatar
JDH JDH is offline
Si vis pacem, para bellum
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 6,895
Thanks: 809
Thanked 10,937 Times in 4,145 Posts
Default

Check with your insurance company first. Some will not cover a flat bed or jack your rate up to the commercial level.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to JDH For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 08:15 AM
down under down under is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 199
Thanks: 972
Thanked 347 Times in 137 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by [_]ni/\/\og View Post
https://dasmule.com/products/norweld...1st-gen-tundra


Seen a few like this at the overland expo.. not as popular here but the Aussie guys seemed to be into them.
Lots of these in Australia. The car-makers stopped using double skin backs so anything sliding around in the back dented the outside of the body. Stupid idea, so everyone started using these. The sides drop down on hinges for very easy loading and flip back up when done. Uses cam locks to tighten the sides into place. Stops everything sliding off. The sides can also be taken off when not needed.
But they can be noisy if the sides are loose, they rattle around.

First thing for a flatbed is to have mesh or something at the front. Anything flying forward will either dent the cab or if high enough literally take your head off.
Also flatbeds catch on vegetation a bit if you go off-road. Don't make it too much wider than the cab.
I would also go aluminium. Steel is great (that is what I've got) but very heavy and wood needs too much maintenance over the years.
One really handy thing is to have enough length to put a motorbike on the back without having to angle it across the bed. A dual-cab probably won't have enough room for this.
For a flatbed have tie rails all around. You'll need them.
Flush mount D-ring tie downs are really good. They do fill up with dirt a lot so you will have to clean them out regularly.
And you can bolt fuel can holders onto the bed. If you put them near the fuel cap it makes it easy to refuel with a siphon.
Putting tool boxes, steel/aluminium storage boxes and fuel can holders down each side of the bed gives a confined area in the middle. This makes it a lot easier to keep things from sliding off.
Don't go too far past the back axle. You might end up with too much weight too far back and this can affect the steering and overload the rear tyres. It also affects exit angle.
Since the bed will be off it might be a good time to stick another fuel tank underneath too.

The good part is that you can move everything around easily. Just drill a few more bolt holes and try different configurations. Or only bolt things on when you want them. Flatbeds are great.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to down under For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 11:37 AM
lasers lasers is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 2,547
Thanks: 33
Thanked 3,298 Times in 1,540 Posts
Default

At work we just bought our first flatbed pickup. There are a lot of nice things about it but also a lot of not so nice things about it.

Put in lots of tie downs.

Put tool boxes under it.

Put shovel/rake/pry bar/tool holders all over it.

If you put on a headache rack make it out of mesh so you can see through the entire back window.

Ours is 8 ft wide and 9 foot long. The length is nice but the width makes it very hard to see behind you when backing or when using a narrow trailer. I would go with 7 foot wide.

Ours has side gates and a tail gate. It is on a lifted f350 with over load springs so it is very high. It is too high to reach over the sides. The tailgate is extremely heavy so we end up using the side gates all the time instead. We intend to build wooden tail and side gates only 4 inches high. That way it is enough to hold stuff in but short enough to easily reach over.

Our tailgate is to high to see behind you so we have it chained up at maybe a 30 degree angle.

Mudflaps behind and in front of the tires are almost a necessity. Or mudflaps behind and fenders above, otherwise the wheels throw water/dirt/stones/ mud into the mirrors/back window/cab.

If you think you have enough tie downs and tool holders, you need more. If you think you have overdone it on tool holders, you still need more.

Always keep an assortment of large, medium, small straps in the truck at all times and bungee cords.

The ability to have sides and rear removable is nice for over sized loads.

Make sure you don't hang the bed to far off the fame that you can no longer hook a trailer to the hitch. The wider you go the easier it is to jackknife a trailer into the overhanging bed.

Keep weight in mind. It is very easy to start building something and before you know it the empty bed takes up all the weight capacity of the truck.

Keep the filler neck in mind. The gas stating we fuel up at has a slight slope and our filler neck is so flat we can only use one side of one pump to fill up, any of the other pumps keep shutting off because the filler tube fills up with fuel and the pump thinks it is full.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to lasers For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 02:55 PM
Jack Swilling's Avatar
Jack Swilling Jack Swilling is offline
VIP Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Ozarks
Posts: 4,260
Thanks: 8,605
Thanked 10,055 Times in 3,124 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AFF View Post
I have a small pickup that is my gas getting truck and I had to put a flatbed on it. I was rear ended by a kid not paying attention while driving. Could not find a bed anywhere so I built one. I used 4x6 crossbeams with stainless steel lag bolts attached to the frame. Then attached pressure treated deck boards to the 4x6 boards. To prevent sagging under load I ran a treated 2x4 across the middle.

I installed 6 anchor points 2 in the front 2 in the middle and 2 at the rear.

I found a set of the grote tail lights - the style you see on dump trucks and f650 or larger trucks. Those only set me back about $20 for the pair and they are bright! For the turn signals I wanted them separate so I just used regular square trailer lights.

Kept the factory bumper for now. I have pulled trailers with it and weekly load my zero turn straight onto the bed and transport it around.

Before the bed was started I cleaned all that I could really well. A little inspection for rust and such is way easier also. Go ahead and replace your shocks.

Looking back it was the best thing I ever did with my small truck. I can haul so much more and itís so much easier too. I get better gas mileage now also. Getting between 22-24 mpg (depends on how I drive and what I have on the bed)

I have used it to haul all kinds of things now and I love it!! Itís wood so the boards are easily replaceable if needed and I can attach things pretty quick and easy if I want. I can add storage, an air compressor, gas tank, or anything so easily now!!
Since it is a Toyota, this makes a lot of sense
No need for serious expensive steel/aluminum flat-bed
Quick reply to this message
Old 05-16-2020, 04:07 PM
AFF's Avatar
AFF AFF is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 900
Thanks: 338
Thanked 646 Times in 351 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Swilling View Post

Since it is a Toyota, this makes a lot of sense
No need for serious expensive steel/aluminum flat-bed
I doubt I have $100 total in mine including wood, stainless shell bolts, lights, and anchors. I have a 2500 I wish had a flatbed too. Just so much you can do with a flatbed.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to AFF For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 04:12 PM
AFF's Avatar
AFF AFF is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 900
Thanks: 338
Thanked 646 Times in 351 Posts
Default

There was only one video on YouTube when I built mine. The account was Lsailor1 the video was how to build a flatbed for a ford ranger or Mazda b2300.

Not sure if I can post the link here
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to AFF For This Useful Post:
Old 05-16-2020, 06:08 PM
NW GUY's Avatar
NW GUY NW GUY is offline
Born 120 years too late.
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 3,582
Thanks: 106
Thanked 11,289 Times in 2,808 Posts
Default

MY 1973 GMC 4X4 developed terminal rust cancer long before its time. When it came time to operate I could literally removes the bed just by pulling on it and it tore away from the frame.

The gas tank was roached so I bought a larger poly gas tank that doubled capacity and mounted on the frame rails at the rear of the cab. It extended above the frame a little so when I built the bed I just ramped over the tank. I used treated lumber for everything as far as building the flatbed. It is easier to work with than steel and it can be trimmed and drilled without any of the effort steel requires.

It had the capacity for side racks but I had also bolted welded eyes to it along sides and back. It was a one ton so there wasn't anything I couldn't carry and the bed being out of lumber would grab and hold instead of letting cargo slide. I had the truck for many more years and when I finally sold it to a wood tick the deck was the strongest and best part of the whole truck.
Quick reply to this message
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to NW GUY For This Useful Post:
Old 06-05-2020, 03:06 PM
mrstang01 mrstang01 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 213
Thanks: 14
Thanked 117 Times in 63 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by [_]ni/\/\og View Post
https://dasmule.com/products/norweld...1st-gen-tundra


Seen a few like this at the overland expo.. not as popular here but the Aussie guys seemed to be into them.
I don't know why we don't use them more here. They may not be as pretty, but they are 100% more useable.
Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to mrstang01 For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Survivalist Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Gender
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net