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Old 02-22-2020, 02:09 AM
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Some have told me in messages that they hope that I will create a new pic thread someday. I finally have many new pics to post. This thread probably could be in the wilderness section but as I have read and heard over the years some have said my mountain retreat is not really wilderness. And looks like from what I remember that the last pic thread I created was in mid March 2014.

Maybe I will create another pic thread in October 2020 or so If / when I do a lot more on my mountain place this coming summer. I also might tell what I did this past summer of 2019 although I have told much in my sticky pic wilderness retreat experiences thread in the wilderness section. I might also tell in this thread later, what I did to live, survive, buy much such as a couple years worth of stored food and so much more. There are 55 photos in the first 3 posts of this thread. Sorry if this is not political or whatever interests most people anymore but these are different and hopefully very interesting even survival related.

If any look at all of these pics then hope many can tell that it is more remote and much harder to get to with the snowpack, closed roads etc. And if there is an epidemic with this coronavirus or whatever someday then it is very likely that a very remote area far from towns and cities is a good place to bug out to and live as long as possible in a remote area?

From Jan. 30 to Feb 2. 2020 I was doing a 4 day adventure snowmobiling and snow shoeing in my mountain area here in Wyoming. An 86 year old neighbor wanted me to go along with him up there. He is originally from Alabama but moved to Wyoming when he was 20 and he worked as a teacher at the University of WY. He lives in the country a few miles from Laramie, WY and he stopped and picked me up on his way to my mtn place which is half a mile from his large cabin. I am in Laramie until June when the snow will have mostly melted and when the paved state highway a mile from my land is plowed open.

He and his wife have a huge cabin about half a mile from my mtn place and needed to melt the snow off of his roof.
It took a day or so running his large wood stove to melt the 6 feet of snow off of his roof and got the temp up to about 90 degrees F. The 6 feet of snow did not actually melt off the roof but after 24 hours or so of the wood stove heating the snow slid off the roof.

Wish I could have gotten a video of that since it would have been great to see the huge amount of snow slide off the huge roof. But no way to know exactly when the snow would slide off and too cold to stand outside waiting. The roof and cabin did shake and made a loud noise when the snow slid. It also slid at least 300 feet down the mountain side even across the private dirt / snowy road which made it harder to walk and use the snowmobiles later with the huge chunks of snow on the road.

I also spent at least 7 hours shoveling the snow off of my camper trailer etc. etc. which was hard but good exercise and the air was so extremely clean. I had to spend the first couple days helping the old neighbor and also I dug out his large propane tank to turn the propane on. And put up more boards over a couple of his windows since the snowpack was getting deeper and will until May or so.

On Feb. 1, 2020 I hiked the half a mile up the road which was packed down some from the snowmobiles. I used one of the old neighbor's snowmobiles which was great. Only the second time I ever drove a snowmobile and it takes some getting used to. I used the snowmobile only when he was using it ( when we were going in and out to his cabin ) since he didn't want me to drive it to my land which was ok since I need more exercise I guess.

The 86 yo neighbor got his snowmobile stuck coming in on the mile and a half from the state highway to his cabin. I was following him and trying to stay in the tracks. I wondered why he was off the road and then I also got off the tracks and had to push my snowmobile back on out of the deep powder which was on the private road. The state highway has a locked gate from mid Nov. to June or whenever the state plows the road open again. The highway is a snowmobile trail then.

Hope a few like these very snowy pics mainly here just showing the six foot snowpack on top of my Palomini camper trailer. I did slide down the about 7 feet to get to the door and looked inside. No damage that I could see from the heavy snowpack. And there should be no damage since I shoveled, even if there is 6 or more feet of snow from now until June.
The last pic is the huge cabin which also has a large partially underground garage. I slept in the lower main floor bedroom feeding the huge woodstove every four hours all night. It is a 4 bedroom, 2 bath cabin / house.


Here are the new pics I took from Jan. 30 to Feb. 2, 2020. Sorry they are not real clear but I just had my phone to take pics and better than nothing. This first pic I took from the private road looking up to the neighbor's very large cabin. With the 2 story's and the huge basement I think it is at least 4,000 sq. feet. The basement has another bedroom plus a garage to store two ATV's and a large amount of firewood and tools.



A spring showing a bit in deep huge snow drift while I was walking on the private road below the cabin. I also helped put up the large gray tarps as seen in the pic above. The tarps enclose the large deck which is the front of the cabin.



Another neighbor Alfred's fancy cabin with at least six feet of snowpack. A few years ago, 2009 I also went up to his cabin with him to melt the snow off of the roof. When the snow slid off of this smaller cabin it greatly shook.



When I was walking the half mile from the neighbor's huge cabin to my mtn place this is my private road and if people enlarge the pic they can see the neighbor's building across the road who has a very large camper trailer stored for the past six years. He built a strong covering for this trailer.





The private road and seen in the distance the covered large trailer.


The ten foot high gate at the beginning of my driveway. This first pic is of the gate in later Nov. 2019 and the second pic I took Feb. 1, 2020



After I hiked up onto my land walking around the big gate up the hill I then looked down behind the gate and seen here is some of the wall made out of 4x8 foot sheets of plywood. I made this around mid Nov. 2019 even when there was more than 2 feet of snow.
I didn't have the time or energy by myself to build a roof. But there is 8 foot snowpack on the other side of this plywood wall. The gate is on the right and I did attach some plywood to the back of the gate




The back of my pickup truck, just before I shoveled most of the snow off of the roof of the truck, shown here as well as some of the plywood wall


A closer view of the back of my truck showing the back of the aluminum camper shell. I had shoveled all of the snow off before I left Nov. 29, 2019 so there was not 6 but only 4 or so feet of snow on the pickup truck roof and the shell. It is a strong shell with a built in toolbox on each side on the inside of the camper shell.



My truck and camper trailer if some have not seen it before. This pic was taken in Nov. 2017 in CO before I left Calirado and moved to Wyoming.



I took this pic from the top of my truck when I had over half of it shoveled. Those are 8 foot high sheets of plywood sticking up.


Next I hiked up to my A-frame shed which I built the summer of 1990. This is the back side


The front side of my A-frame shed and the 2nd pic shows me standing in front of this shed in Jan. 2009.




My Palomini camper trailer had six feet of snowpack at least on top of the roof. I had to shovel it off before anymore snow accumulated and six or more feet can accumulate from early Feb. to June. Just beginning to shovel shown here and the very top of the Palomini can barely be seen and the ladder sticking up is 12 feet tall. I had to dig down to find that ladder first. Seems like this could be called a fancy snow cave especially when inside the camper if people can get inside. I could have if I would have shoveled more around the door.



Shoveled more here and the shovel has a large chunk of snow on it and it helped that I could shovel chunks of snowpack out although some were large and heavy. It took me seven hours to shovel all of the roofs over this camper trailer and my two pickup trucks.



Looking down the hole that was around the front door of my Palomini camper. Also I had to use the shovel to lift myself back out. I could have shoveled a ramp out but that would have taken another half an hour or so. I did make some cuts in the snowpack to climb out while lifting myself up with the horizontal shovel.

As I hope many can see the large dark window and the front door is by the snow pack. Very glad that I had put up this strong plywood wall to keep the snow pack off of the windows and door. It is 2 to 3 layers of plywood.






After I had shoveled almost all of the six feet of snowpack off of the Palomini roof I saw this plastic cover over a vent. That is pretty strong plastic and very glad to see that it had not cracked from the heavy snowpack.

I had stuck my head inside to look in the camper and saw no damage or even a sagging roof. I would have had to shovel a lot more to be able to open the door all of the way. This shows the plastic cover and the second pic shows it in early October 2019 before it snowed. Also in the second pic shows looking down my driveway and a white pickup on the private road.




There is a 25 photo limit on each post so more pics in the next post.
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Old 02-22-2020, 02:10 AM
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I am extremely glad that I was able to shovel the snow off of the roof of my vehicles and especially off of the nice camper trailer. Here is what happened to a guy who had a real nice 2 story cabin but a record breaking snow crushed the 2nd story. This pic was taken in July 2011 and notice the old snowpack to the left.



I wanted to stay and shovel more on my land especially shovel more off of the two pickup truck roofs but they likely are ok. And my feet were getting real cold after hiking and then standing shoveling for seven hours. I hiked back down to the neighbor's cabin. He wanted me to get back before dark and he also wanted me to be in his cabin and not stay in my camper. I did help him much with firewood and melting the snow off of his huge cabin. This is the last pic showing the snowmobiles and the old neighbor's truck. He had a real large enclosed snowmobile trailer behind this truck.



More later and if there are Any questions just ask. Although after June 1, 2020 I must get back up to my mtn place and hopefully stay up there this time permanently for at least 5 and maybe even for 20 or more years.
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Old 02-22-2020, 03:47 AM
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I'm going to try to post as concisely as possible but still tell quite a bit what I have done since July 8, 2019 when I went up to my mountain retreat. I had not been up there much since Nov. 2014 when I had to stay with my elderly parents as their caregiver. They went into a nursing home in CO in Feb. 2016 and both passed away within six days of each other around early June 2016.

I finally moved out of CO in March 2018. Too much to tell about although I have told in several pages since July 2018 in this thread if any are interested and have not seen what I posted > https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...ad.php?t=84562

On July 8, 2019 I moved to my mountain retreat after spending a year in Laramie, Wyoming in an inexpensive motel. I was doing business and recovering from an amputation of my toes during that time. I hired a guy and his crew to move all of my stuff out of CO to my mtn land in Wyoming on July 8, 2019.

It took me from July 8 to mid September 2019 to get stuff somewhat organized and put into a shed and under tarps. I had twenty plus boxes to move. Much clothing and stored food plus other stuff. I also had to clean up my 100 plus foot driveway so that I could move my Palomini camper trailer and my two pickup trucks up as high as possible on my driveway.
My driveway is a 50 plus year old logging road so I have not had to hire a bull dozer like most neighbors with cabins have done. I also moved a huge amount of firewood and an old garage off of the driveway. In mid September I had 100 sheets of plywood plus much other lumber mainly 2x4's delivered to my land from Saratoga Lumber which is 30 miles from my land.

A pic of that lumber before I carried it up the mountain to where I was building a wall etc. around my camper trailer and pickup trucks.



A couple pics of the very large stacks of firewood that I moved off of the driveway last summer of 2019





This pic shows much of what I had to remove and clean up. A very large tree had fallen also that I had to move and make into firewood.



I had bought a few pickup trucks of stored food last summer. This is a pic of a guy who came out to help me for four days in early October 2019. He had rented this pickup truck although I paid for all of the rental plus I paid his expenses, plane ticket etc. Shown here is half of what I bought that day in early October. I now have two gas generators, plus six solar panels and at least a two year supply of stored food. One year or so of canned food plus much freeze dried and bulk foods.



I don't need to store water even though I have 3 fifty gallon plastic drums to store water. I have 2 good drinking water springs.

Here is part of a "tunnel or hallway" that I built from the new lumber. I will build a hallway much longer this coming summer of 2020. Plus build a good roof over the camper trailer and two pickup trucks. The following pics were taken in late October to mid November 2019.










I also have two large woodstoves that I did use but I covered with tarps for the winter. One is a new cast iron stove and the other I use to burn trash and real large logs / rounds. The trash burner stove is a 55 gallon steel drum as seen here.







This is larger than it looks and will be great when I build a roof over it. The real new cast iron stove.



I made the 55 gallon drum stove in 1999 out of an old barrel and using a steel spike and hammer I made this hole in the top of the stove for an 8 inch stovepipe.



The black 55 gallon steel drum that is sealed tight and I have it packed full of packets of Mountain House freeze dried food and some other food also. No insects, mice or bears can get into the steel drums. I have another sealed drum packed full of food inside of a shed.



I am showing these two pics of my F-350 truck since it was interesting to me anyway, getting the truck onto my land. This pic was taken Oct. 27 after a couple feet of snow had fallen a few days earlier. I had been to Saratoga, Wyoming which is 30 miles from my land. I needed to go there to get many more supplies; mainly canned food and much more. This truck is full in the back seat and mostly full in the bed of the truck under the camper shell. Probably a one year supply of food just in this truck plus another year or so of stored food elsewhere on my retreat.

I had the choice of driving back to the small town of Encampment 12 miles down the mountain and leaving my truck with all of the valuables in it at a friend's place or getting it onto my land and leaving it. No one has or will be able to steal anything from this truck in the winter until mid June or later and I will be back up there by then.

It was exciting to drive it for a mile, thru the two plus feet of snow with ice underneath. I had chains on the truck but it still got stuck trying to go up the driveway. It took me 5 hours to dig all around the tires, axles etc. and to dig almost to the ground for thirty feet. At least the truck and valuables are very safe and I was just happy to get it up on my land.




All for now and Any questions just ask and I likely will answer...
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Old 02-22-2020, 12:58 PM
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And people freak out here with a few inches of snow.
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Old 02-22-2020, 01:09 PM
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Building technique is questionable. Not trying to be mean but real.
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Old 02-22-2020, 02:50 PM
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Building technique is questionable. Not trying to be mean but real.
I am just glad that a few are responding. Especially since I spent more than five hours creating this long pic thread.

I have seen mean and nasty, mainly several trolls over the years on this huge forum and yours is not but is a good comment that I get a chance to respond to and explain.

But I will respond as much as I can to your comment. Of course my building technique is questionable and likely Terribly illegal in most states. It would not be Allowed and doesn't follow building codes and is not society Approved! It is also called "Thinking outside of the box."

Don't think I have done too bad since my buildings are still standing especially the A-frame shed which I built the summer of 1990. It is built out of forty pallets and even oak pallets for the floor.

These pics with explanations tell more of some of what I and a few others consider successes, built for little money and with No building permits etc etc etc. None needed especially when it is so very remote and covered in snow for 6 or sometimes 8 months out of the year.

Here is a photo of my steel beam cabin which I likely will just make into a very strong greenhouse storage visitors cabin. Two strong steel beams and many large logs make this possibly snowpack proof. Last winter was an unusually deep terribly heavy snowpack as some have told me but my bunker and this steel beam cabin all survived with No damage. >



The red beam shown is the steel I beam with ten large logs I put on top of two steel beams. It has survived 7 hard ten foot or so snow pack winters and possibly will survive another hundred winters.





The following pic shows the inside of the steel beam greenhouse cabin. The steel beam is black supported by 2x4's. I with WR's help slid the heavy steel beam across the 2x4's that late summer of 2014.




This is the back of the A-frame shed I built in 1990 by myself like usual. It has since gotten damaged some from the terribly heavy snow pack but is still standing as I saw this past summer of 2019.

This next summer of 2020 I plan to remove these white steel panels and put them on the roof over my camper trailer. Those should be suciety approved as if I care.



This is the back trap door made from a salvaged steel door from a large tank from an abandoned factory. Finished this bunker mostly in 2006 began digging the 20 x 10 x 9 foot deep hole in 1995. I also built 4 sheds during that ten years and I built the half finished steel beam greenhouse cabin the summer of 2014 some with WR's help.

NO snow pack or even real big heavy trees or even a tank driving over the underground bunker can damage this. As if a tank or even an ATV could get there high on my mountain hillside.



BTW here, shown in the pic below, is a very society Approved, building code permitted and Real building that was destroyed by a more than usual deep snowpack. This guy had to rebuild it and put a lot more trusses on.
Across the road from me is a building contractor who only builds Real society approved buildings and he is spending huge amounts of money over the past five years building a cabin and is not even half done yet. His strong cover over his large camper trailer cost more than five thousand dollars not including labor.
His strong Real structure almost collapsed and still has many large cracks in some of the lumber and even his strong Real trusses got crushed but luckily his camper trailer did not get too damaged. Here is the formerly real society approved cabin that was built a mile from my land >>>>>>

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Old 02-22-2020, 03:44 PM
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I actually don't care what people think, what they do or even believe, as long as it doesn't affect me or people I do care about.

AND one more time This is why I bought my land in 1987 for $8,000 now worth $50,000 not including any unreal buildings I build. A couple people over the years actually asked me when I was giving them a tour of the underground bunker they asked me: "Is this Real?" I should have said no just your imagination of course.

Again This is one big reason I bought the land and am Free to build what I want and Need without going into debt and living like most can only maybe imagine.

The view from my sunny hillside where I am slowly building the greenhouse cabin etc. and I would like to cut down many of the dead beetle killed trees but I still have a couple dozen out of 100 or so dead pine trees to cut down on my own land. The Beautiful Snowy Range is seen 30 or so miles to the east.

So This ? >>>>






Usual view at twilight from my mtn place


Or This?


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Old 02-22-2020, 03:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtnman Mike View Post
Some have told me in messages that they hope that I will create a new pic thread someday. I finally have many new pics to post. This thread probably could be in the wilderness section but as I have read and heard over the years some have said my mountain retreat is not really wilderness. And looks like from what I remember that the last pic thread I created was in mid March 2014.

Maybe I will create another pic thread in October 2020 or so If / when I do a lot more on my mountain place this coming summer. I also might tell what I did this past summer of 2019 although I have told much in my sticky pic wilderness retreat experiences thread in the wilderness section. I might also tell in this thread later, what I did to live, survive, buy much such as a couple years worth of stored food and so much more. There are 55 photos in the first 3 posts of this thread. Sorry if this is not political or whatever interests most people anymore but these are different and hopefully very interesting even survival related.

If any look at all of these pics then hope many can tell that it is more remote and much harder to get to with the snowpack, closed roads etc. And if there is an epidemic with this coronavirus or whatever someday then it is very likely that a very remote area far from towns and cities is a good place to bug out to and live as long as possible in a remote area?

From Jan. 30 to Feb 2. 2020 I was doing a 4 day adventure snowmobiling and snow shoeing in my mountain area here in Wyoming. An 86 year old neighbor wanted me to go along with him up there. He is originally from Alabama but moved to Wyoming when he was 20 and he worked as a teacher at the University of WY. He lives in the country a few miles from Laramie, WY and he stopped and picked me up on his way to my mtn place which is half a mile from his large cabin. I am in Laramie until June when the snow will have mostly melted and when the paved state highway a mile from my land is plowed open.

He and his wife have a huge cabin about half a mile from my mtn place and needed to melt the snow off of his roof.
It took a day or so running his large wood stove to melt the 6 feet of snow off of his roof and got the temp up to about 90 degrees F. The 6 feet of snow did not actually melt off the roof but after 24 hours or so of the wood stove heating the snow slid off the roof.

Wish I could have gotten a video of that since it would have been great to see the huge amount of snow slide off the huge roof. But no way to know exactly when the snow would slide off and too cold to stand outside waiting. The roof and cabin did shake and made a loud noise when the snow slid. It also slid at least 300 feet down the mountain side even across the private dirt / snowy road which made it harder to walk and use the snowmobiles later with the huge chunks of snow on the road.

I also spent at least 7 hours shoveling the snow off of my camper trailer etc. etc. which was hard but good exercise and the air was so extremely clean. I had to spend the first couple days helping the old neighbor and also I dug out his large propane tank to turn the propane on. And put up more boards over a couple of his windows since the snowpack was getting deeper and will until May or so.

On Feb. 1, 2020 I hiked the half a mile up the road which was packed down some from the snowmobiles. I used one of the old neighbor's snowmobiles which was great. Only the second time I ever drove a snowmobile and it takes some getting used to. I used the snowmobile only when he was using it ( when we were going in and out to his cabin ) since he didn't want me to drive it to my land which was ok since I need more exercise I guess.

The 86 yo neighbor got his snowmobile stuck coming in on the mile and a half from the state highway to his cabin. I was following him and trying to stay in the tracks. I wondered why he was off the road and then I also got off the tracks and had to push my snowmobile back on out of the deep powder which was on the private road. The state highway has a locked gate from mid Nov. to June or whenever the state plows the road open again. The highway is a snowmobile trail then.

Hope a few like these very snowy pics mainly here just showing the six foot snowpack on top of my Palomini camper trailer. I did slide down the about 7 feet to get to the door and looked inside. No damage that I could see from the heavy snowpack. And there should be no damage since I shoveled, even if there is 6 or more feet of snow from now until June.
The last pic is the huge cabin which also has a large partially underground garage. I slept in the lower main floor bedroom feeding the huge woodstove every four hours all night. It is a 4 bedroom, 2 bath cabin / house.


Here are the new pics I took from Jan. 30 to Feb. 2, 2020. Sorry they are not real clear but I just had my phone to take pics and better than nothing. This first pic I took from the private road looking up to the neighbor's very large cabin. With the 2 story's and the huge basement I think it is at least 4,000 sq. feet. The basement has another bedroom plus a garage to store two ATV's and a large amount of firewood and tools.



A spring showing a bit in deep huge snow drift while I was walking on the private road below the cabin. I also helped put up the large gray tarps as seen in the pic above. The tarps enclose the large deck which is the front of the cabin.



Another neighbor Alfred's fancy cabin with at least six feet of snowpack. A few years ago, 2009 I also went up to his cabin with him to melt the snow off of the roof. When the snow slid off of this smaller cabin it greatly shook.



When I was walking the half mile from the neighbor's huge cabin to my mtn place this is my private road and if people enlarge the pic they can see the neighbor's building across the road who has a very large camper trailer stored for the past six years. He built a strong covering for this trailer.





The private road and seen in the distance the covered large trailer.


The ten foot high gate at the beginning of my driveway. This first pic is of the gate in later Nov. 2019 and the second pic I took Feb. 1, 2020



After I hiked up onto my land walking around the big gate up the hill I then looked down behind the gate and seen here is some of the wall made out of 4x8 foot sheets of plywood. I made this around mid Nov. 2019 even when there was more than 2 feet of snow.
I didn't have the time or energy by myself to build a roof. But there is 8 foot snowpack on the other side of this plywood wall. The gate is on the right and I did attach some plywood to the back of the gate




The back of my pickup truck, just before I shoveled most of the snow off of the roof of the truck, shown here as well as some of the plywood wall


A closer view of the back of my truck showing the back of the aluminum camper shell. I had shoveled all of the snow off before I left Nov. 29, 2019 so there was not 6 but only 4 or so feet of snow on the pickup truck roof and the shell. It is a strong shell with a built in toolbox on each side on the inside of the camper shell.



My truck and camper trailer if some have not seen it before. This pic was taken in Nov. 2017 in CO before I left Calirado and moved to Wyoming.



I took this pic from the top of my truck when I had over half of it shoveled. Those are 8 foot high sheets of plywood sticking up.


Next I hiked up to my A-frame shed which I built the summer of 1990. This is the back side


The front side of my A-frame shed and the 2nd pic shows me standing in front of this shed in Jan. 2009.




My Palomini camper trailer had six feet of snowpack at least on top of the roof. I had to shovel it off before anymore snow accumulated and six or more feet can accumulate from early Feb. to June. Just beginning to shovel shown here and the very top of the Palomini can barely be seen and the ladder sticking up is 12 feet tall. I had to dig down to find that ladder first. Seems like this could be called a fancy snow cave especially when inside the camper if people can get inside. I could have if I would have shoveled more around the door.



Shoveled more here and the shovel has a large chunk of snow on it and it helped that I could shovel chunks of snowpack out although some were large and heavy. It took me seven hours to shovel all of the roofs over this camper trailer and my two pickup trucks.



Looking down the hole that was around the front door of my Palomini camper. Also I had to use the shovel to lift myself back out. I could have shoveled a ramp out but that would have taken another half an hour or so. I did make some cuts in the snowpack to climb out while lifting myself up with the horizontal shovel.

As I hope many can see the large dark window and the front door is by the snow pack. Very glad that I had put up this strong plywood wall to keep the snow pack off of the windows and door. It is 2 to 3 layers of plywood.






After I had shoveled almost all of the six feet of snowpack off of the Palomini roof I saw this plastic cover over a vent. That is pretty strong plastic and very glad to see that it had not cracked from the heavy snowpack.

I had stuck my head inside to look in the camper and saw no damage or even a sagging roof. I would have had to shovel a lot more to be able to open the door all of the way. This shows the plastic cover and the second pic shows it in early October 2019 before it snowed. Also in the second pic shows looking down my driveway and a white pickup on the private road.




There is a 25 photo limit on each post so more pics in the next post.
Awesome pics and enjoy reading your stories of your beautiful snowy mountain retreat ... !!! Keep posting more .....
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Old 02-22-2020, 03:56 PM
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You really do look well prepared ... !!! You should write a book about your adventures .....

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I'm going to try to post as concisely as possible but still tell quite a bit what I have done since July 8, 2019 when I went up to my mountain retreat. I had not been up there much since Nov. 2014 when I had to stay with my elderly parents as their caregiver. They went into a nursing home in CO in Feb. 2016 and both passed away within six days of each other around early June 2016.

I finally moved out of CO in March 2018. Too much to tell about although I have told in several pages since July 2018 in this thread if any are interested and have not seen what I posted > https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...ad.php?t=84562

On July 8, 2019 I moved to my mountain retreat after spending a year in Laramie, Wyoming in an inexpensive motel. I was doing business and recovering from an amputation of my toes during that time. I hired a guy and his crew to move all of my stuff out of CO to my mtn land in Wyoming on July 8, 2019.

It took me from July 8 to mid September 2019 to get stuff somewhat organized and put into a shed and under tarps. I had twenty plus boxes to move. Much clothing and stored food plus other stuff. I also had to clean up my 100 plus foot driveway so that I could move my Palomini camper trailer and my two pickup trucks up as high as possible on my driveway.
My driveway is a 50 plus year old logging road so I have not had to hire a bull dozer like most neighbors with cabins have done. I also moved a huge amount of firewood and an old garage off of the driveway. In mid September I had 100 sheets of plywood plus much other lumber mainly 2x4's delivered to my land from Saratoga Lumber which is 30 miles from my land.

A pic of that lumber before I carried it up the mountain to where I was building a wall etc. around my camper trailer and pickup trucks.



A couple pics of the very large stacks of firewood that I moved off of the driveway last summer of 2019





This pic shows much of what I had to remove and clean up. A very large tree had fallen also that I had to move and make into firewood.



I had bought a few pickup trucks of stored food last summer. This is a pic of a guy who came out to help me for four days in early October 2019. He had rented this pickup truck although I paid for all of the rental plus I paid his expenses, plane ticket etc. Shown here is half of what I bought that day in early October. I now have two gas generators, plus six solar panels and at least a two year supply of stored food. One year or so of canned food plus much freeze dried and bulk foods.



I don't need to store water even though I have 3 fifty gallon plastic drums to store water. I have 2 good drinking water springs.

Here is part of a "tunnel or hallway" that I built from the new lumber. I will build a hallway much longer this coming summer of 2020. Plus build a good roof over the camper trailer and two pickup trucks. The following pics were taken in late October to mid November 2019.










I also have two large woodstoves that I did use but I covered with tarps for the winter. One is a new cast iron stove and the other I use to burn trash and real large logs / rounds. The trash burner stove is a 55 gallon steel drum as seen here.







This is larger than it looks and will be great when I build a roof over it. The real new cast iron stove.



I made the 55 gallon drum stove in 1999 out of an old barrel and using a steel spike and hammer I made this hole in the top of the stove for an 8 inch stovepipe.



The black 55 gallon steel drum that is sealed tight and I have it packed full of packets of Mountain House freeze dried food and some other food also. No insects, mice or bears can get into the steel drums. I have another sealed drum packed full of food inside of a shed.



I am showing these two pics of my F-350 truck since it was interesting to me anyway, getting the truck onto my land. This pic was taken Oct. 27 after a couple feet of snow had fallen a few days earlier. I had been to Saratoga, Wyoming which is 30 miles from my land. I needed to go there to get many more supplies; mainly canned food and much more. This truck is full in the back seat and mostly full in the bed of the truck under the camper shell. Probably a one year supply of food just in this truck plus another year or so of stored food elsewhere on my retreat.

I had the choice of driving back to the small town of Encampment 12 miles down the mountain and leaving my truck with all of the valuables in it at a friend's place or getting it onto my land and leaving it. No one has or will be able to steal anything from this truck in the winter until mid June or later and I will be back up there by then.

It was exciting to drive it for a mile, thru the two plus feet of snow with ice underneath. I had chains on the truck but it still got stuck trying to go up the driveway. It took me 5 hours to dig all around the tires, axels etc. and to dig almost to the ground for thirty feet. At least the truck and valuables are very safe and I was just happy to get it up on my land.




All for now and Any questions just ask and I likely will answer...

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Old 02-22-2020, 04:17 PM
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You really do look well prepared ... !!! You should write a book about your adventures .....
Thanks and not sure if I will ever write a book. Maybe a blog or journal. I did begin writing a journal this past summer of 2019 and wrote two pages. Too much to do and I'm not too inspired to write since a great deal to clean, organize and build. I am a great deal more prepared than I even show or tell about and cannot and must not tell Everything unless maybe some come up to visit and If I were to give them a tour.

There is a fiction book written sorta about or was inspired by my mountain place, written by Watch Ryder who also made a few dozen videos when he was on my land for two summers. It is titled "Mountain Hold" and is still for sale if people search amazon etc.

My blog, journal and just sharing are these pic threads. I have made eleven long pic threads now I think and this is different, much more snowy anyway, than the others.
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Old 02-22-2020, 04:25 PM
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Thanks and not sure if I will ever write a book. Maybe a blog or journal. I did begin writing a journal this past summer of 2019 and wrote two pages. Too much to do and I'm not too inspired to write since a great deal to clean, organize and build. I am a great deal more prepared than I even show or tell about and cannot and must not tell Everything unless maybe some come up to visit and If I were to give them a tour.

There is a fiction book written sorta about or was inspired by my mountain place, written by Watch Ryder who also made a few dozen videos when he was on my land for two summers. It is titled "Mountain Hold" and is still for sale if people search amazon etc.

My blog, journal and just sharing are these pic threads. I have made eleven long pic threads now I think and this is different, much more snowy anyway, than the others.
I will check out that book "Mountain Hold" ..... I remember when they visited your mountain retreat, and watch the videos.
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Old 02-22-2020, 07:23 PM
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Glad to see your trailer and truck made it. I was afraid the snow would be to heavy and damage something. I can't imagine having that kind of snow. The pics are great and I enjoyed looking at them. Did you get bit by the snowmobile bug? Would give you a way in during the winter.
I still can't get the van running and I'm afraid it might be in the throttle body. I ordered 5 rosa rugosa and 2 paw paw trees. Might have to steal a car to get down to the land to get them planted. Starting to get stir crazy sitting around.
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Old 02-22-2020, 07:54 PM
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This thread is awesome. Thanks for posting.
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Old 02-22-2020, 08:02 PM
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Glad to see your trailer and truck made it. I was afraid the snow would be to heavy and damage something. I can't imagine having that kind of snow. The pics are great and I enjoyed looking at them. Did you get bit by the snowmobile bug? Would give you a way in during the winter.
I still can't get the van running and I'm afraid it might be in the throttle body. I ordered 5 rosa rugosa and 2 paw paw trees. Might have to steal a car to get down to the land to get them planted. Starting to get stir crazy sitting around.
Too many go crazy or drunk or whatever especially in the winter if they don't have much to do. One reason Alaska and other such places have a bar in every town. One place in Wyoming I saw had two bars and one gas station and no church. Its population is 52. I like to read, write some and even plan and prepare during the winter months. One more reason I took a lot of time to create this thread.

About my truck and trailer is I thought they would likely make it even if there was a record breaking snowpack. Just a bit above average so far although March and April are usually even the most snowy months.

My truck is very strong and the aluminum camper shell is reinforced with two toolboxes inside the shell. One tool box on each side. And about my Palomini camper here is a pic showing the inside. It was made in 2014 in Michigan where they likely know snow. It is not very big and has a strong steel roof. Inside notice the shelves and structure that is from the floor to the ceiling. That seems to be reinforcing the roof greatly. There are like 4 columns inside the camper as seen in this partial pic. >



About snowmobiling is that it is not cheap. I hope to buy a used snowmobile and I would use it mainly to get to town if / when I needed to go to town. I am sure that I could stay on my remote land for six months at least IF necessary without ever going to town or any kind of "civilization."

Snowmobiling takes getting used to. I got up to over 30 mph and that was too fast even on the groomed trail which is the state highway in snow free months.

The 86 yo guy my neighbor who owned both snowmobiles, I saw him get stuck Twice. Not easy to get unstuck. I don't plan to go over 20 mph and maybe even just 10 mph on the private road especially if I am alone such as next winter. It is real nice to go sorta slow and enjoy the beautiful scenery.

Much more I could write but maybe later...
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Old 02-23-2020, 12:29 AM
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That is a beautiful camper ... !!! Looks like a mini-tiny-house !!! But, can you keep warm enough during the harsh winter cold ... ?

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Too many go crazy or drunk or whatever especially in the winter if they don't have much to do. One reason Alaska and other such places have a bar in every town. One place in Wyoming I saw had two bars and one gas station and no church. Its population is 52. I like to read, write some and even plan and prepare during the winter months. One more reason I took a lot of time to create this thread.

About my truck and trailer is I thought they would likely make it even if there was a record breaking snowpack. Just a bit above average so far although March and April are usually even the most snowy months.

My truck is very strong and the aluminum camper shell is reinforced with two toolboxes inside the shell. One tool box on each side. And about my Palomini camper here is a pic showing the inside. It was made in 2014 in Michigan where they likely know snow. It is not very big and has a strong steel roof. Inside notice the shelves and structure that is from the floor to the ceiling. That seems to be reinforcing the roof greatly. There are like 4 columns inside the camper as seen in this partial pic. >



About snowmobiling is that it is not cheap. I hope to buy a used snowmobile and I would use it mainly to get to town if / when I needed to go to town. I am sure that I could stay on my remote land for six months at least IF necessary without ever going to town or any kind of "civilization."

Snowmobiling takes getting used to. I got up to over 30 mph and that was too fast even on the groomed trail which is the state highway in snow free months.

The 86 yo guy my neighbor who owned both snowmobiles, I saw him get stuck Twice. Not easy to get unstuck. I don't plan to go over 20 mph and maybe even just 10 mph on the private road especially if I am alone such as next winter. It is real nice to go sorta slow and enjoy the beautiful scenery.

Much more I could write but maybe later...
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Old 02-23-2020, 05:09 PM
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That is a beautiful camper ... !!! Looks like a mini-tiny-house !!! But, can you keep warm enough during the harsh winter cold ... ?
That is one of several reasons I moved to Laramie, WY on Nov. 29, 2019 and I likely will stay here until June 1, 2020 when most of the snow has melted.

I did keep plenty warm inside of the camper trailer even until late November. In mid October 2019 it got down to 5 degrees F. And I still did not have to have a woodstove going. I hope to possibly somehow get woodstove heat inside the camper but will see this next summer.

When it was 5 degrees F. for a couple days even in mid October I just mostly stayed inside the warmest sleeping bag I own. It is a $200 Arctic sleeping bag and I even have a second bag inside also. Very warm when inside the bags even though there was ice on the windows and frost all over the walls of the camper.

I also wore many of my warmest clothes and two pair of thermal underwear. I have two goose down vests, a Nike goose down ski coat and thermal overalls and much more.

I also had an electric heater going inside of the camper whenever I had the new gas generator going. I only used the generator once a week except the last five days I was up there I knew I was going to leave so I had the generator going a lot and used ten gallons of gas. I still have 25 gallons of gas stored up there.

I also was a bit concerned that the scissor jacks on my camper might get crushed. In October I talked to a guy who has a really large camper trailer across the road. He is one of several elk, bear and deer hunters who bow and rifle hunt from Sept. to late October. He had left his large camper up there all winter four years ago. All of his scissor jacks got crushed and part of his roof. He repaired it all and still uses that camper.

My camper trailer should be ok now since I shoveled about all of the snowpack off of the roof.

VJ and whomever else likes my camper and it is I think, similar to a tiny house. Much easier and faster than trying to build some kind of fancy cabin with all that this modern Palomini camper has. I only paid $6,500 which is half of what I had found for very similar ones online. I bought mine thru Facebook Marketplace and it worked out well. My Palomini was built in 2014 and still looks like new.

More pics of it if any are interested. There is a small bathroom with a shower and toilet although I cannot hook up the water unless I use a barrel and hose to fill the water tanks in the camper trailer. I took pics of all but the bathroom. >




Pic of my Palomini in the town where I bought it in CO.



Any other questions or comments are welcome. And IF it is possible there are a few people who might want to visit me and my mountain area this coming summer of 2020 please contact me before June 1, 2020 since I will be much more difficult to contact this summer probably into Nov. or longer if possible.
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Old 02-25-2020, 01:02 PM
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Mike, I was showing my wife the pictures of the snow on the roofs up on the mountains, she was quite amazed. We have gotten a lot of snow here, half way to the arctic circle here in Canada. But nothing like that.

For that kind of snow load the steeper the pitch of the roof, the better. Along with strong materials, like your use of the steel I beam. I cant remember if you put up more pictures of the A Frame in the past, but I've been contemplating building one on my one property as a little getaway spot. Any advice, pro's, cons for an A Frame that you can give me?
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Old 02-25-2020, 03:19 PM
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Mike, I was showing my wife the pictures of the snow on the roofs up on the mountains, she was quite amazed. We have gotten a lot of snow here, half way to the arctic circle here in Canada. But nothing like that.

For that kind of snow load the steeper the pitch of the roof, the better. Along with strong materials, like your use of the steel I beam. I cant remember if you put up more pictures of the A Frame in the past, but I've been contemplating building one on my one property as a little getaway spot. Any advice, pro's, cons for an A Frame that you can give me?
Thank you greatly for posting and asking me a question. Never sure if very many will respond in this thread much less even like this thread. Fewest thanks and views of any of my pic threads so far but hope that people will at least glance at the pics in the first 3 posts of this thread to see something sorta different if nothing else.

Not sure about any advice except to say that A-frame is the best above ground structure to handle snow load for most. My steel beam greenhouse cabin I think, will be even much stronger than the A-frame shed I built in 1990 though. The steel beam cabin also has a mostly flat roof with a lot of big logs / tree trunks on top. Plus two sheets of plywood etc.

The underground shelter with 3 layers of logs, 5 sheets of plywood and much concrete, dirt and rocks is The strongest but I don't expect anyone to build such as what I have built. Mainly since my buildings are - as many love to keep telling me - crude, too cheap and even not real. My buildings are still standing even with an average of Ten feet of snowpack every winter.

I used strong pallets with plywood on top to build my A-frame shed in 1990 all obtained for free from a dumpster at a factory I was working at around that time. I think I used forty pallets for the roof, walls and floor. I used some nuts and bolts to put most of them together. Putting up the top of the roof was the most difficult and dangerous since like usual, I was working alone. Balancing a sheet of wood in one hand and nailing it in place with the other. I did not use pallets for the very top of my A frame shed but just sheets of wood.

Here are all of the pics I could find of my A-frame shed except for the snowy pics I posted in the first couple posts of this Snowy Adventure thread. I also added a couple other A-frame pics.

The heavy snowpack was doing damage to my A-frame shed and so I was putting up these white steel panels I had found for free at the Encampment WY landfill. The deep heavy snowpack has pushed the whole shed six inches to the left which is facing downhill. Not too bad since I built this in 1990 the very first of any of my buildings.



The next summer I painted these white steel panels more camo with gray and black paint >



The front of my A-frame showing some deer antlers, a horse shoe over the door and a pan to pan for gold >




This one I have had for more than ten years or so but never shown since it is blurry and I don't tell Everything usually. It is difficult to find also >



This is the front of my 80 yo neighbor Alfred"s cabin, which is not nearly as big as the huge cabin I posted earlier where I helped and spent 4 days about a month ago. This was taken by me in 2009 and is more of a fancy Swiss chalet type cabin but I am sure many probably even most people will like this better because it is fancy, expensive - about $100,000 - and more real and society approved than any of my buildings.
Except for my Tuff shed but that is another true tale.

Al in front of his fancy cabin which also has two bedrooms with a king size bed upstairs with a Great view of the Snowy range mountains. This cabin also has a Thousand gallon water tank in the basement and he has pipe running from a spring to the tank >



A real A-frame cabin I found a pic of which maybe some can build. Too small to cover my vehicles even my camper etc.



Any other questions from anyone just ask.
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Old 02-25-2020, 04:48 PM
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Cool pics. Thanks for sharing. You have worked hard and accomplished a lot. And for a fraction of the cost of the fancy buildings.

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Thank you greatly for posting and asking me a question. Never sure if very many will respond in this thread much less even like this thread. Fewest thanks and views of any of my pic threads so far but hope that people will at least glance at the pics in the first 3 posts of this thread to see something sorta different if nothing else.

Not sure about any advice except to say that A-frame is the best above ground structure to handle snow load for most. My steel beam greenhouse cabin I think, will be even much stronger than the A-frame shed I built in 1990 though. The steel beam cabin also has a mostly flat roof with a lot of big logs / tree trunks on top. Plus two sheets of plywood etc.

The underground shelter with 3 layers of logs, 5 sheets of plywood and much concrete, dirt and rocks is The strongest but I don't expect anyone to build such as what I have built. Mainly since my buildings are - as many love to keep telling me - crude, too cheap and even not real. My buildings are still standing even with an average of Ten feet of snowpack every winter.

I used strong pallets with plywood on top to build my A-frame shed in 1990 all obtained for free from a dumpster at a factory I was working at around that time. I think I used forty pallets for the roof, walls and floor. I used some nuts and bolts to put most of them together. Putting up the top of the roof was the most difficult and dangerous since like usual, I was working alone. Balancing a sheet of wood in one hand and nailing it in place with the other. I did not use pallets for the very top of my A frame shed but just sheets of wood.

Here are all of the pics I could find of my A-frame shed except for the snowy pics I posted in the first couple posts of this Snowy Adventure thread. I also added a couple other A-frame pics.

The heavy snowpack was doing damage to my A-frame shed and so I was putting up these white steel panels I had found for free at the Encampment WY landfill. The deep heavy snowpack has pushed the whole shed six inches to the left which is facing downhill. Not too bad since I built this in 1990 the very first of any of my buildings.



The next summer I painted these white steel panels more camo with gray and black paint >



The front of my A-frame showing some deer antlers, a horse shoe over the door and a pan to pan for gold >




This one I have had for more than ten years or so but never shown since it is blurry and I don't tell Everything usually. It is difficult to find also >



This is the front of my 80 yo neighbor Alfred"s cabin, which is not nearly as big as the huge cabin I posted earlier where I helped and spent 4 days about a month ago. This was taken by me in 2009 and is more of a fancy Swiss chalet type cabin but I am sure many probably even most people will like this better because it is fancy, expensive - about $100,000 - and more real and society approved than any of my buildings.
Except for my Tuff shed but that is another true tale.

Al in front of his fancy cabin which also has two bedrooms with a king size bed upstairs with a Great view of the Snowy range mountains. This cabin also has a Thousand gallon water tank in the basement and he has pipe running from a spring to the tank >



A real A-frame cabin I found a pic of which maybe some can build. Too small to cover my vehicles even my camper etc.



Any other questions from anyone just ask.
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Old 03-14-2020, 01:32 PM
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I have always enjoyed your posts. Thanks for these as well. Not my cup of tea but if you are happy that is all that matters.
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