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Old 05-28-2020, 11:17 PM
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MikeK MikeK is offline
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Leave is a relative term. She's reading this board fairly often. She just got tired of the "Low Information but Proud" types that look for openings in hopes they can slip in doubt that won't get crushed.

She decided my resiliency at putting down those types works well enough.

So I play spokesman for her if she wants something sent out.

I'll also message her if I meet something thorny that she's better to tackle.



We've lost so many of the good ones, Mike, for the same reason Min got tired of posting.
Oh Lord can I ever relate to that. It's something I dealt with when I was considering if I should even come back or not. It took me several months before I did.

Well, next time you chat with her, let her know that she was appreciated by more than she realized.
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Old 05-29-2020, 02:37 AM
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Oh Lord can I ever relate to that. It's something I dealt with when I was considering if I should even come back or not. It took me several months before I did.

Well, next time you chat with her, let her know that she was appreciated by more than she realized.
I do that already to make sure the bridge stays strong.
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Old 05-29-2020, 07:59 AM
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I am glad this has been brought up. I hope NY Min is reading

BTW, I thanked her original post! I wish I could thank some posts twice.
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Old 06-16-2020, 03:10 PM
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Thanks. Very helpful.
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Old 06-16-2020, 03:33 PM
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I don't dehydrate as many foods as I would like. The prep is a bit more intense, gotta get over that. I do dehydrate onions. I hate cutting them up, I may try wearing goggles next time. I put the dehydrator on the porch due to the stench of the onions. But a bushel of onions goes down to a few half gallon jars of pieces and if I powder them it is even less. I haven' t needed to do any in a couple years but will need some this year.
Got a meat slicer? Makes slicing all those onions to dehydrate much easier and seems to be easier on the eyes and nose too. Don't know if that's just mental or not, but worth a try for you.
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Old 06-16-2020, 04:19 PM
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I have been gone for a while also. What happened to Mel?
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Old 06-16-2020, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Potawami II View Post
Got a meat slicer? Makes slicing all those onions to dehydrate much easier and seems to be easier on the eyes and nose too. Don't know if that's just mental or not, but worth a try for you.
A cheap mandoline slicer handles onions like a breeze. For those who do much dehydrating, a good mandoline is a wise investment. There are some that don't waste the last bit of whatever you're slicing, and handle thin veggies like celery. Instead of the shuttle that rides on top of the produce, they have a two piece unit that looks sorta like the feed tube of a food processor. I have yet to get one of those fancy ones. But the ones I have are indispensible kitchen tools.
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Old 06-16-2020, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Potawami II View Post
Got a meat slicer? Makes slicing all those onions to dehydrate much easier and seems to be easier on the eyes and nose too. Don't know if that's just mental or not, but worth a try for you.
Chill them a bit and you will have less tears. Also the root end should be cut last. The root end is where the sulfur compounds are the strongest. You cut the stem end and peel, leaving the root end intact, and put the onions to chill for a day in the fridge. Then you put on the slicer or mandoline, and slice from the stem end, working toward the root end. Then just toss the root end.

I have to say though that dried onion and garlic isn't the best value to DIY. A pound of flakes/granules runs average of $5/lb from spice companies. Buying fresh onions or garlic to dehydrate will always cost you more than buying the dehydrated already made. It's even kind of iffy growing your own crop if you have to seed it. Better to wait until you are growing the walking kind that produce continuously.

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I have been gone for a while also. What happened to Mel?
Gone. And that's really the best way to leave that particular conversation.

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Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
A cheap mandoline slicer handles onions like a breeze. For those who do much dehydrating, a good mandoline is a wise investment. There are some that don't waste the last bit of whatever you're slicing, and handle thin veggies like celery. Instead of the shuttle that rides on top of the produce, they have a two piece unit that looks sorta like the feed tube of a food processor. I have yet to get one of those fancy ones. But the ones I have are indispensible kitchen tools.
Some general comments on mandolines.

It is smart to trying them out on an affordable one with mostly plastic parts just to gauge their value to your dehydrating efforts, but then you should skip the intermediate value types and go for a 100% steel one. No plastic at all. These will be expensive. Like $100 plus. Going mid grade, like an OXO, does you no favors. Look at the Bron Coucke or Matfer Bourgeat pro models.

The key is to judge the utility of a mandoline to you. Cheap counter top models will show you, if not last you long. You either need a mandoline a lot or you don't need one at all. Wanting a mandoline to use only rarely is actually not wanting a mandoline. If you won't use it annually then either stick to just using a chef's knife, or look into an affordable meat slicer so you can get some extra utility out of it. A mandoline that spends a whole year in a cabinet is just a fancy boat anchor. Mind you, it need not be a daily or weekly use tool. Maybe it only comes out at harvest season, but is working for hours daily during that time. If it turns a Fall harvest processing job from 4 days into 2 then you bought yourself two freedom days a year for $100, that gets more economical each year. At the end of life you'll be paying a lot more than $50 a day to extend life.

It's the expectation that it will be what you grab to make a dinner salad is where people screw up. They think they will use it frequently for tiny jobs and then stand ready for the rare big job. But cleaning them up will eventually deter you from using them for small jobs. How hard is it to rinse a chef knife under the tap? Mandolines are really only for the big jobs. If you have the really big jobs one or more times a year then you will use them enough to warrant the high investment.

So drop $25 to $35 on a mostly plastic one that doesn't look like it will fall apart on the first try. Put it through the paces, say with a bag of potatoes for a couple big skillets of fried potatoes and onions. If it seems to be worth the cleaning effort of using it when your dehydrating season comes around then start shopping for a restaurant grade model. If you think it's just too much work to clean up and maintain (blade service on good ones is regular chore), as opposed to just using a chef knife, then skip the hunt for a good one and just use the plastic one until you break it.

A mandoline exemplifies the saying go-big-or-go-home. It's not worth having for dainty jobs.
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Old 06-16-2020, 09:03 PM
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Good info on the onions. I have tried cold water which helps some. Another suggestion is s to wear a gas mask which I have not tried. That would be the time for company .

I now grow my own onions. I have found some I can eat and not get an upset tummy. Thus, I dry them. I believe I am allergic to onions and garlic as both seem to be "toxic" to me. It may not be the best value dollar wise but taste wise and tummy it works. I spent a day cutting and fussing and had three years' worth of onions.
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Old 06-16-2020, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Cat wrangler View Post
Good info on the onions. I have tried cold water which helps some. Another suggestion is s to wear a gas mask which I have not tried. That would be the time for company .

I now grow my own onions. I have found some I can eat and not get an upset tummy. Thus, I dry them. I believe I am allergic to onions and garlic as both seem to be "toxic" to me. It may not be the best value dollar wise but taste wise and tummy it works. I spent a day cutting and fussing and had three years' worth of onions.
Yes, dehydrating your own fruits and veggies is not always cheaper...unless you look at the cost of buying organic and dehydrating vs. growing your own and dehydrating. In that case, I have found diy to be cheaper. I just started dehydrating - there is a learning curve. But once you have the equipment, after a few batches, I find that my dried produce comes out pretty well!
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Old 06-16-2020, 10:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Cat wrangler View Post
Good info on the onions. I have tried cold water which helps some. Another suggestion is s to wear a gas mask which I have not tried. That would be the time for company .

I now grow my own onions. I have found some I can eat and not get an upset tummy. Thus, I dry them. I believe I am allergic to onions and garlic as both seem to be "toxic" to me. It may not be the best value dollar wise but taste wise and tummy it works. I spent a day cutting and fussing and had three years' worth of onions.
Remember the sulfur compounds involved. You may not be "allergic" to the vegetable as much as the compounds some varieties contain.

Try Vidalia, Texas 1015, WalaWala, and Maui onion varieties. They are all yellow varieties, btw.

If they cause few or no problems then your answers isn't onions, but sulfur compounds in them.

With home gardening you can outsmart this problem.



Also look to shallots. It's a "garlic-y" kind of onion. Perfect for dishes calling for both onion and garlic together. It is also a low sulfur option. Plus the cost of fresh is so high that home gardening to make dehydrated will likely not be a net negative monetary effort.

Finally you have the leek. Very low sulfur. Very high retail when fresh. Always a good garden value over just buying it.


I think if you drill on this issue more that you can sidestep most or all of the discomfort by using your garden and dehydrator.

Medical issues change the value equation that I was discussing before.
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Old 06-16-2020, 11:26 PM
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Vidalia & Wala Wala are my favorites.

I lived on Maui for a few years.

I had Maui red onions there sweet enough you could almost eat them like an apple.
Talk about great on burgers & in salads.
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Old 06-17-2020, 01:42 AM
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I had Maui red onions there sweet enough you could almost eat them like an apple.
Talk about great on burgers & in salads.
Red onions though are not an automatic indicator of low sulfur.

They may all be extra sweet, but some are still brutal eye killers.

They don't state a variety in stores. It's just "red onions", whereas with sweet yellows they will state if it is Texas 1015, Vidalia, etc.

I've learned not to trust red onions if I'm looking for mildness. Sweet, sure, but not always mild.
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Old 06-17-2020, 07:13 AM
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Hmm, sulfur, also found in wine, which makes me very ill more often than not. I need to look at what garlic has for sulfer as just the smell makes me ill.
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Old 06-17-2020, 04:19 PM
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Hmm, sulfur, also found in wine, which makes me very ill more often than not. I need to look at what garlic has for sulfer as just the smell makes me ill.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliinase

There is a rabbit hole that might interest you.

If you start tying a raft of problem food sources to sulfur compounds then go see an Internist.

Certain sulfur compounds are important for life and that sensitivity might indicate a problem as yet undetected.
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Old 06-18-2020, 07:54 PM
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...

I now grow my own onions. I have found some I can eat and not get an upset tummy. Thus, I dry them. I believe I am allergic to onions and garlic as both seem to be "toxic" to me. It may not be the best value dollar wise but taste wise and tummy it works. I spent a day cutting and fussing and had three years' worth of onions.
Onions and garlic are high in fructans -- a type of carbohydrate that can cause GI upset for some people.

Do any other high fructan foods bother you? I can get by with some so long as I don't overeat any one thing or have several sources in one meal, but onions are one of the worst for me. Watermelon as well, but I love it and pay the price for that a few times each summer.

Last edited by allye; 06-18-2020 at 09:18 PM..
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Old 06-19-2020, 07:21 AM
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Off to look up fructans. This is a good example of what makes SB a good place to hang out.
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Old 06-22-2020, 01:11 PM
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Remember the sulfur compounds involved. You may not be "allergic" to the vegetable as much as the compounds some varieties contain.

Medical issues change the value equation that I was discussing before.
Yep, sulfur compounds. It's why I can't eat ANYTHING in the brassica Oleracea (cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, etc) family...sulforaphane. Apparently, I'm allergic to the sulforaphane, and the cabbage family is higher in it than any other vegetable family. Hence, OFF the menu.
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Old 07-03-2020, 08:16 AM
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If you are planning on dehydrating frozen veggies, here's what I have found for planning how many to buy at once:

Peas: 2lbs = 1 pint
Corn: 5lbs = 3 pints (barely)
Broccoli: 7lbs = 2 quarts.

I try to buy enough at a time to have full jars when I'm done.
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