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Old 11-01-2019, 12:08 AM
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leadcounsel leadcounsel is offline
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Inflation calculator only really works for identical goods.

Few goods today are "identical" to decades prior. $10 of computing power today could do more computing than an entire branch of NASA spending billions of dollars 50 years ago.

Trucks and cars today maybe represent a larger portion of income. But they have such advance safety, handling, horsepower, towing capacity, steering, braking, theft proofing, communication, and entertainment that they are almost unrecognizable from cars our grandparents had. And better mileage. Folks grouse about the cost of cars and fuel.
Seems someone today is doing far better with fuel costs. Gas has not kept up with inflation and is cheaper today and cars tend to get about 4x better fuel economy than 4 decades ago. A car from 1970 might go 100,000 miles if you're meticulous on maintenance and storing it. A car today will go 300,000 miles with the same care. That's 10 years versus 30 years of return on a single vehicle if well maintained. So while cars might be a bit more expensive, they last 3x longer, are infinitely safer and better handling and more reliable, and fuel goes farther so more efficient.

Guns today maybe of lesser "quality" but generally far more affordable and "tactically" useful than decades ago. It really is an "arms race" of sorts. Not many folks owned ARs and AKs and high capacity semi-autos 4 decades ago. Now it seems everyone does. And big gun collections are not uncommon.

You couldn't BUY certain medical procedures at ANY PRICE 4 decades ago. Now even though some are expensive, complex procedures are routine (and often out-patient). Heart transplants, limb reattachment, prosthetic, etc.

Communication and entertainment costs have plummeted.
* When I was a kid a VCR was $400 and only really wealthy people had them and a small movie collection. We resorted to "renting" VCRs and tapes and it was a expensive hassle, probably $20 for a day or two. A typical TV was maybe 26" or 32" tube TV, costing probably $500 or $1000. Those really nice Trinitrons or massively bulkly projection TVs were 40-50" and $2000. DVD players were $300+. DVDs were $20 each. Now, any of that technology is practically free and plentiful for free or a small price. You could easily snap up a working TV, DVD player, entire surround stereo system, and TV and massive DVD collection from about 15 years ago for under a couple Benjamins.

* Phones. Landlines, generally 1 per house or 2 or 3 if you were spoiled. Long distance costs per minute. Huge phone bills. Phones were inconvenient, dialing numbers, carrying around a wallet with all your contacts, paying pay phone rates, locked to about a 10' space on a land line. Ever get that unexpected multi-hundred dollar phone bill for those unplanned collect calls or long distance calls? Yeah, we did...
* Now, phones are cheap, last years, and store massive amounts of data. Emails and social media have exploded communication ability that is instant and free. Sharing ideas is simple. And it's nearly free. My phone bill is $50 fixed. Internet means I can access any information I want any time I want, all for $40. No newspaper subscriptions, no cable TV bill, etc. So for under $100 per month, my communication needs are infinitely better and more convenient than decades ago.

And so forth.

Things today are expensive, but I suspect life has always been expensive. We live in incredible times of bounty and plenty.

And, if you want the nostalgea of old used or outdated goods, there's markets for that. You can get practically free or literally free old TVs, cars, clothes, electronics, record players, etc. in any city. Just search your ads online.
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Old 11-01-2019, 06:42 AM
PalmettoTree PalmettoTree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leadcounsel View Post
Inflation calculator only really works for identical goods.

Few goods today are "identical" to decades prior. $10 of computing power today could do more computing than an entire branch of NASA spending billions of dollars 50 years ago.

Trucks and cars today maybe represent a larger portion of income. But they have such advance safety, handling, horsepower, towing capacity, steering, braking, theft proofing, communication, and entertainment that they are almost unrecognizable from cars our grandparents had. And better mileage. Folks grouse about the cost of cars and fuel.
Seems someone today is doing far better with fuel costs. Gas has not kept up with inflation and is cheaper today and cars tend to get about 4x better fuel economy than 4 decades ago.

Guns today maybe of lesser "quality" but generally far more affordable and "tactically" useful than decades ago. It really is an "arms race" of sorts. Not many folks owned ARs and AKs and high capacity semi-autos 4 decades ago. Now it seems everyone does. And big gun collections are not uncommon.

You couldn't BUY certain medical procedures at ANY PRICE 4 decades ago. Now even though some are expensive, complex procedures are routine (and often out-patient). Heart transplants, limb reattachment, prosthetic, etc.

Communication and entertainment costs have plummeted.
* When I was a kid a VCR was $400 and only really wealthy people had them and a small movie collection. We resorted to "renting" VCRs and tapes and it was a expensive hassle, probably $20 for a day or two. A typical TV was maybe 26" or 32" tube TV, costing probably $500 or $1000. Those really nice Trinitrons or massively bulkly projection TVs were 40-50" and $2000. DVD players were $300+. DVDs were $20 each. Now, any of that technology is practically free and plentiful for free or a small price. You could easily snap up a working TV, DVD player, entire surround stereo system, and TV and massive DVD collection from about 15 years ago for under a couple Benjamins.

* Phones. Landlines, generally 1 per house or 2 or 3 if you were spoiled. Long distance costs per minute. Huge phone bills. Phones were inconvenient, dialing numbers, carrying around a wallet with all your contacts, paying pay phone rates, locked to about a 10' space on a land line. Ever get that unexpected multi-hundred dollar phone bill for those unplanned collect calls or long distance calls? Yeah, we did...
* Now, phones are cheap, last years, and store massive amounts of data. Emails and social media have exploded communication ability that is instant and free. Sharing ideas is simple. And it's nearly free. My phone bill is $50 fixed. Internet means I can access any information I want any time I want, all for $40. No newspaper subscriptions, no cable TV bill, etc. So for under $100 per month, my communication needs are infinitely better and more convenient than decades ago.

And so forth.

Things today are expensive, but I suspect life has always been expensive. We live in incredible times of bounty and plenty.

And, if you want the nostalgea of old used or outdated goods, there's markets for that. You can get practically free or literally free old TVs, cars, clothes, electronics, record players, etc. in any city. Just search your ads online.
Exactly! Well said.
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Old 11-01-2019, 03:24 PM
OldDesertrat OldDesertrat is offline
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For consumer price inflation and unemployment percentages, I go by www.shadowstats.com. Williams still uses pre-Clinton methodology in his calculations.
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