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Old 05-30-2019, 12:24 AM
eyepal eyepal is offline
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That's thing about tornado's, you never know how strong they'll be when they hit .
To be sure, it's a rough road ahead for many .
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Old 05-30-2019, 12:47 AM
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10 years ago a tornado destroyed one of the 2 farmsteads the family owns. It shoved a big chunk of a 100 foot barn through the front of the house. Blew the door to the upstairs backwards through the frame and puffed the sides of the house out 2 inches after removing every window. It was an old house my grandfather built using used old growth lumber from a county run poor house he tore down on the property. It stood up well considering. Luckily, it was getting ready for a sibling to move in and they hadn't yet. So they missed being there by a week.

The neighbor woke up to the rain hitting him in the face. He got up from his bed and got dressed.

We spent a couple days cleaning up, but mostly with a bulldozer and fire.

As long as I live in tornado alley I will have a basement.
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:55 AM
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Latest count is 13 tornadoes in SW Ohio.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by InOmaha View Post
If I live in tornado valley I will have a basement.
I'd prefer a concrete dome.
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:00 AM
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500 hundred tornados in 30 days

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.blo...-seven-decades
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:13 AM
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So in other words 50,000?
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:39 AM
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I'd prefer a concrete dome.
When I retire, I think I'll downsize to a house of my design. A combination of tornado, hurricane, and fire resistant designs. Ranch style with 1/2 the living area under ground, concrete walls, steel beam or heavy wood truss anchored to the foundation through the concrete walls, steel roof bolted, tied, or tack welded to the beams. Out of flood zones, and dressed in brick accents. Hurricane resistant glass with working shutters. Solar roof, wind backup, on 160 acres, right next to my pond. Hobby farm stuff.

200-250 mph base design criteria. The factor of safety used will probably make it survive a head on hit by a decent EF5, but the basement will have living area, bedrooms, and a small kitchenette to live in if the upstairs is damaged. Missile design definitely 200 mph. It's the tree the storm is tossing that gets the party started. Tornadoes rip roofs off by getting under the eaves and into garages and lifting, then the structure falls apart because the walls are large surface areas with no support. Keep the roof on and the chances of survival go up. I hurricane tied my roof using these types of metal reinforcements in the attic and long screws.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/18-Gauge...2-5A/203302239

They won't stop the big storms from tearing things apart, but help with the small 100+ mph stuff.
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:59 AM
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Reports coming that some bad ones ripped through Ohio last night
The ones that hit Ohio were Force One. Barely strong enough to be called tornadoes. They tore roofs off of badly constructed apartment buildings and a school with a flimsy metal roof. They showed a picture of a big limb off a tree, but it took very little to see that the tree had a rotten core; any strong wind would have knocked it down. I loved how Daily Mail had six or seven pics of debris, but look close and it's the same area, about 200 yards square, taken from different points of view, apparently with a drone.

Big thing about the Ohio area was that there were several of them in one short time frame. Most touched down on farmland or forest and did virtually no damage at all.

I live in SE Ohio. Was awake at midnight - saw all the red watchboxes on the NOAA radar maps headed right for me. But all I got was some rain. Not even wind!

Climate hoaxers are going crazy, of course, but we've had several years of fewer than normal tornadoes. They don't want to know about a little principle of statistics called "regression to the mean".
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Old 05-30-2019, 09:47 AM
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The ones that hit Ohio were Force One. Barely strong enough to be called tornadoes. They tore roofs off of badly constructed apartment buildings and a school with a flimsy metal roof. They showed a picture of a big limb off a tree, but it took very little to see that the tree had a rotten core; any strong wind would have knocked it down. I loved how Daily Mail had six or seven pics of debris, but look close and it's the same area, about 200 yards square, taken from different points of view, apparently with a drone.

Big thing about the Ohio area was that there were several of them in one short time frame. Most touched down on farmland or forest and did virtually no damage at all.

I live in SE Ohio. Was awake at midnight - saw all the red watchboxes on the NOAA radar maps headed right for me. But all I got was some rain. Not even wind!

Climate hoaxers are going crazy, of course, but we've had several years of fewer than normal tornadoes. They don't want to know about a little principle of statistics called "regression to the mean".
3 were EF0, 2 or 3 were EF1, the rest were EF2 & 3. There are some areas of Grange Hall rd and N. Fairfield rd in Beavercreek that are leveled. A co-worker was in that area Tuesday. The Northridge area of Harrison Twp off Wagoner Ford rd just east of I75 has a leveled neighborhood along with significant damage just to the west of I75 at Dixie Dr. A newer neighborhood in Trotwood was hit along with the apartments (lower income area) you probably saw on tv. EF3 hit Celina, car was thrown into a house causing the only fatality. There was a lot of rural area hit but they did a lot of damage across the northern Dayton metropolitan area.

On a side note. Anyone see the meltdown of one of the local weather guys during the event? I don't watch that channel and didn't hear about it till last night.
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Old 05-30-2019, 10:00 AM
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So in other words 50,000?
Waa, waa, cry about it. Sorry you found something to trigger you.
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Old 05-30-2019, 10:58 AM
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KCK got hit with an EF-4 (170 mph) and Lawrence an EF-2 (115 mph). MSN and others are taking donations..
Sun's out for 3 days, then 6 days of rain/storms in OK .
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Old 05-30-2019, 12:56 PM
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Dayton, Ohio area here, 5 confirmed tornadoes and more across Ohio on Memorial Day evening about 2300 and later. 1 death in Celina Ohio and 160+ in hospitals.

Would like to beat the news crews who shove a camera and mic in someone’s face, sweating, dirty and distraught and ask them “How does this make you feel” or entering someone’s home and panning the camera over their destroyed possessions saying, we don’t know who lived here but it’s a mess.
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I hate seeing that kind of thing as well. It’s not right but they will always do it no matter how personal it may be.

LE set up perimeters and checkpoints for safety, rescue/recovery, emergency utility/work crews, prevent looting, and for people's privacy. Unfortunately, the vultures sometimes get through, but can be and are removed if there are bona fide health/safety risks, or they're interfering/impeding any emergency operations, including resident or business owner access/work. This takes a lot of manpower, which is why in urban areas, depending on the situation, hundreds of LE will be on-scene ASAP.

The actual meteorologists, especially from NWS and the stations that had huge meteorological coverage during the storm were great, as were the storm chasers and some of the spotters. Emergency relief like Red Cross, Salvation Army, and local churches were awesome, too.

Besides the media that capitalized on human misery, some of the worst/most unreasonable people that showed up were some of the insurance adjusters and landlords The sight-seers, scavengers, and looters were the absolute worst, and were dealt with appropriately.
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:15 PM
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3 were EF0, 2 or 3 were EF1, the rest were EF2 & 3. There are some areas of Grange Hall rd and N. Fairfield rd in Beavercreek that are leveled. A co-worker was in that area Tuesday. The Northridge area of Harrison Twp off Wagoner Ford rd just east of I75 has a leveled neighborhood along with significant damage just to the west of I75 at Dixie Dr. A newer neighborhood in Trotwood was hit along with the apartments (lower income area) you probably saw on tv. EF3 hit Celina, car was thrown into a house causing the only fatality. There was a lot of rural area hit but they did a lot of damage across the northern Dayton metropolitan area.

On a side note. Anyone see the meltdown of one of the local weather guys during the event? I don't watch that channel and didn't hear about it till last night.
NOAA was reporting them all as Force 1 the morning after. Do you have other, more reliable information?

Yeah, that weatherman made it to the Internet, so yes, I saw it reported. Not the video - I don't waste time with video.
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by InOmaha View Post
When I retire, I think I'll downsize to a house of my design. A combination of tornado, hurricane, and fire resistant designs. Ranch style with 1/2 the living area under ground, concrete walls, steel beam or heavy wood truss anchored to the foundation through the concrete walls, steel roof bolted, tied, or tack welded to the beams. Out of flood zones, and dressed in brick accents. Hurricane resistant glass with working shutters. Solar roof, wind backup, on 160 acres, right next to my pond. Hobby farm stuff.

200-250 mph base design criteria. The factor of safety used will probably make it survive a head on hit by a decent EF5, but the basement will have living area, bedrooms, and a small kitchenette to live in if the upstairs is damaged. Missile design definitely 200 mph. It's the tree the storm is tossing that gets the party started. Tornadoes rip roofs off by getting under the eaves and into garages and lifting, then the structure falls apart because the walls are large surface areas with no support. Keep the roof on and the chances of survival go up. I hurricane tied my roof using these types of metal reinforcements in the attic and long screws.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/18-Gauge...2-5A/203302239

They won't stop the big storms from tearing things apart, but help with the small 100+ mph stuff.
We're working on that hardened home dream now. It's surprisingly cheap to do. Not any more expensive than an above ground home of the same size. Steel beam and mesh domes sprayed with concrete and buried. You can do any amount of buried/exposed you want with the homes and people even put normal house looking facades on them.

https://www.survivalistboards.com/sh...d.php?t=899008

Considering the damage the farm took from the hail/debris of the tornado that went by recently, I wish we already had it built.
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:42 PM
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NOAA was reporting them all as Force 1 the morning after. Do you have other, more reliable information?
Local news report this morning quoting the NOAA or NWS, some official entity, don't recall who. Had been on the ground evaluating each reported site and data since Tuesday. I first heard 5 on Tuesday, then 6, then 9 and finally 13 this morning.

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Yeah, that weatherman made it to the Internet, so yes, I saw it reported. Not the video - I don't waste time with video.
My question is why he was paying any attention to fb during a critical time unless he was trying to find witness accounts. It wasn't his place to address the issue regardless even though I agree with him. That was the producer's place to address the morons watching the bachlorette. Despite agreeing with him, the guy is a class A jackass as a person and there are better meteorologists and weather program on another station so I never watch him.
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Old 05-30-2019, 02:36 PM
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Roy Spencer has the meteorological explanation for more tornadoes, but the climate crazies aren't going to like it.

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/roy-...kN9ruK7PaPJyMY

Answer is that tornadoes need COOL air, and that's just what the late snows in the upper midwest and plains states are supplying.

COOL air, for those of you blogging from Rio Linda.

Quote:
The simple answer is that tornado formation requires unusually cool air.
-snip-
Very few thunderstorms produce tornadoes. In the hot and humid tropics, they are virtually unheard of. The reason why is that (unlike hurricanes) tornadoes require strong wind shear, which means wind speed increasing and changing direction with height in the lower atmosphere.

These conditions exist only when a cool air mass collides with a warm air mass. And the perfect conditions for this have existed this year as winter has refused to lose its grip on the western United States. So far for the month of May 2019, the average temperature across the U.S. is close to 2 degrees Fahrenheit below normal.
Aaawwww, poor climate crazies.
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Old 05-31-2019, 05:53 AM
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Well, being a lifelong east texan, I am not worried about tornado's, but this has been an unusually active year. I sometimes wonder if weather manipulation has something to do with it (HAARP or some udder).
But, God is in charge and if it is meant for me to FLY to heaven, then so be it. We have had so much rain here that the trees are vulnerable to being pushed over, and we had 5 LARGE oaks/pines go down on our place during one of the storms that came thru in last couple weeks. A nearby city had hundreds of trees downed also. The tornado actually touched down just east of the city but wasnt much to it.
It is just something you get used to. I will stay here because I know this is where God wants me. Damn the torpedo's, full speed ahead!
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Old 05-31-2019, 02:36 PM
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When I retire, I think I'll downsize to a house of my design. A combination of tornado, hurricane, and fire resistant designs. Ranch style with 1/2 the living area under ground, concrete walls, steel beam or heavy wood truss anchored to the foundation through the concrete walls, steel roof bolted, tied, or tack welded to the beams. Out of flood zones, and dressed in brick accents. Hurricane resistant glass with working shutters. Solar roof, wind backup, on 160 acres, right next to my pond. Hobby farm stuff.

200-250 mph base design criteria. The factor of safety used will probably make it survive a head on hit by a decent EF5, but the basement will have living area, bedrooms, and a small kitchenette to live in if the upstairs is damaged. Missile design definitely 200 mph. It's the tree the storm is tossing that gets the party started. Tornadoes rip roofs off by getting under the eaves and into garages and lifting, then the structure falls apart because the walls are large surface areas with no support. Keep the roof on and the chances of survival go up. I hurricane tied my roof using these types of metal reinforcements in the attic and long screws.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/18-Gauge...2-5A/203302239

They won't stop the big storms from tearing things apart, but help with the small 100+ mph stuff.
I kind of lucked into a great shelter. I purchased an old bank (built in 1906) for my office and after my divorce renovated the back half into an apartment. I now just so happen to have an 8x12 walk in bank vault attached to the bedroom. That thing isn't going anywhere.
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Old 06-03-2019, 09:39 AM
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That safe would be a cool bunker as long as the door can open after.

I'm down in the southeast now for work. I can tell it's been a cool spring up north as the temps were in the 70s there and 90s here. I'm not accustomed to this sort of heat/humidity yet. The news people here were hoping for rain. Back home, they're hoping it stops raining. I don't think we've had 2 consecutive dry days in months and it's raining back home again today. It's starting to feel like a mix between Portland and Miami at home. Cool, rainstorm everyday.

Other than the frozen ground rain that melted the snow and caused floods; we're still only 3" above normal rainfall for the last month. It just comes every day instead of in the bigger amounts, with dry time in between, like typical spring storms.

The weather looks more stable until Mexico sends a huge swath of moisture right up the Mississippi basin later this week. This new batch of moisture coming up from the gulf instead of the pacific, might touch stuff off later this week.
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Old 06-03-2019, 10:01 AM
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That safe would be a cool bunker as long as the door can open after.
That is the question. Need to be able to open it from the inside. A vent would be nice to have too.
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