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Old 02-23-2020, 03:23 PM
bilmac bilmac is offline
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Just went by a board fence today and it reminded me of how ugly they are. Look at some yourself before you make one. How about a normal picket fence with the gaps, and a two or three foot rabbit proof wire fence along the bottom. Might even save you some $.
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Old 02-23-2020, 05:13 PM
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BearC BearC is offline
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Originally Posted by fistfulladirt View Post
Been doing raised beds for 20 years, if I do any new, itís going to be plastic comp boards as theyíll last forever, as opposed to anything else. Thanks Iamfarticus.
Been using plastic comp boards for several years now and have replaced all of my raised beds with these. Work like a charm and look as new as the day I put them in.

My area you pretty much have to go with raised beds and container gardening. Takes years and $$$ to get the "soil" (90% dam building clay) to even grow grass that isn't spotty...
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Old 03-16-2020, 11:31 AM
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Slim2634 Slim2634 is offline
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I appreciate the tips, especially the pictures and explanation of the raised beds! We have decided to join forces with my mother in law (corona panic has her back in gear on the preps) and use her already setup plot. Iím going to add some raised beds for lettuce close to my house so I can get it as needed. I used a raised bed when I lived in the city and the lettuce went crazy in it. I will add more as we expand. So far, most of my seedlings are all looking a little sad. Iím not sure if they werenít getting enough water or light but the tomatoes have all fallen over but everything else is looking halfway okay.
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Old 03-16-2020, 03:00 PM
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Weedinhoe Weedinhoe is offline
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Originally Posted by Slim2634 View Post
Iím not sure if they werenít getting enough water or light but the tomatoes have all fallen over but everything else is looking halfway okay.
If they're falling over I'd first check the lighting. If they're not getting enough they will stretch to try for more and eventually fall over. If you have them on a windowsill you need to turn them every day to keep them from bending towards the sun.

Depending on how big they are, you can repot them right up the the first true set of leaves and roots will grow all along the buried stem. Sometimes you can support them. I keep cheap bamboo skewers on hand and break them in half to use as mini "stakes".

To check moisture, just pick up the container and see how heavy or light it is. You don't want to keep it sopping wet and risk having fungus gnats. You'll figure out when it feels like they need some water before they even show stress.
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Old 03-20-2020, 11:52 AM
hoplite59 hoplite59 is offline
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Hello,

My wife and I moved into our house fall of 2018 and have been slowly working on our property. We self-contracted and build the home ourself so lots of projects to do before spending the time gardening.

We have a place about 20x60 that we plan to till up and plant this spring. My mother-in-law lives on the property behind us and has a good deal of gardening experience. We plan to do a 4 foot picket fence around our garden (pickets will not have spaces between to prevent rabbits from entering). We are in zone 6.

Anyways, we are wanting to plant tomatoes for sauce making, various squash, green beans, peppers and potatoes. I also plan to plant a few types of apple trees. We eat various things and her mom is teaching us to can and has a freeze drier. I also plan to create a compost pile built with pallets that we have lying around.

I have a few questions that I cannot find an answer on in my research.

When tilling up my plot, should I put anything around the garden to separate it from the yard around it?

Are there any soil tests I can purchase online in order to get a baseline of my soil parameters?

What is the best way to keep animals off of small trees to ensure they have time to grow?

Any other easy to grow vegetables that youíd recommend that I didnít include?

Build raised beds, easiest to maintain and assure high soil quality. Also, get online and get seeds ordered . Start with lettuce and beets ASAP. Easy to cultivate and grow quickly. Depending on what zone you are in, now is ideal for those crops. My beets and lettuce are going into the soil today once rain lets up.
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Old 03-20-2020, 05:52 PM
ebjr1967 ebjr1967 is offline
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Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
If they're falling over I'd first check the lighting. If they're not getting enough they will stretch to try for more and eventually fall over. If you have them on a windowsill you need to turn them every day to keep them from bending towards the sun.

Depending on how big they are, you can repot them right up the the first true set of leaves and roots will grow all along the buried stem. Sometimes you can support them. I keep cheap bamboo skewers on hand and break them in half to use as mini "stakes".

To check moisture, just pick up the container and see how heavy or light it is. You don't want to keep it sopping wet and risk having fungus gnats. You'll figure out when it feels like they need some water before they even show stress.
I also direct a fan on tomato seedlings to help strengthen them.
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Old 03-21-2020, 01:02 AM
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BrettTheOkie BrettTheOkie is offline
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Originally Posted by ebjr1967 View Post
I also direct a fan on tomato seedlings to help strengthen them.
This is an important lesson that I learned the hard way when I first started doing my own seedlings.

Oklahoma is known for its winds, especially in the spring. The first time I did my own seedlings, the wind here just beat them to death when I transplanted them outside.

Now I put the seedling trays outside whenever possible, to toughen them up against the wind before transplanting.
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Old 03-21-2020, 12:10 PM
ebjr1967 ebjr1967 is offline
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This is an important lesson that I learned the hard way when I first started doing my own seedlings.

Oklahoma is known for its winds, especially in the spring. The first time I did my own seedlings, the wind here just beat them to death when I transplanted them outside.

Now I put the seedling trays outside whenever possible, to toughen them up against the wind before transplanting.
I wouldn't want the wind you have over there. I don't bother with corn, since so many grow it here, but I couldn't imagine growing it in OK.

I usually only do this with my tomatoes and peppers because I start pretty early in the house under a flouro shoplight.

Of course, the fan wouldn't be much help if they're allowed to get leggy. For that, when starting indoors, I keep the light about a half an inch above the seedlings. Then, when I transfer to the greenhouse, I'll throw the fan on them, and pretty much everything else that's already going on in there. This has worked very well for me over the years.
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Old 03-22-2020, 12:33 AM
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BrettTheOkie BrettTheOkie is offline
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Originally Posted by ebjr1967 View Post
I wouldn't want the wind you have over there. I don't bother with corn, since so many grow it here, but I couldn't imagine growing it in OK.
I have seen corn grown on a commercial scale in the far eastern part of the state, but whatever variety it is seems to mature without getting very tall. I'm sure the wind is a factor in that choice. Around where I live, it's mostly wheat that is grown.

My little garden plot of corn is always a tall variety. And, inevitably, we will get a mid-late summer storm that blows most of the stalks over on their sides. It's a hassle to stand them back up and pack dirt around the bases, but the corn never seems to suffer from it.
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