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Old 10-10-2018, 03:28 PM
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Another piece of advice, plant a diversity of different edibles. Usually conditions allow for at least something to survive and on a good year, everything does!
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Old 10-10-2018, 05:15 PM
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I bought a plastic greenhouse kit that I will try in the spring. Going to buy some barrels to catch rainwater.
Should I leave the little fence I have up and throw all my leaves in it this fall? Will that help the soil?
Thanks again for all the ideas and support. I want to move on from prepper hoarding to prepper living.
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Old 10-10-2018, 06:24 PM
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I bought a plastic greenhouse kit that I will try in the spring. Going to buy some barrels to catch rainwater.
Should I leave the little fence I have up and throw all my leaves in it this fall? Will that help the soil?
Thanks again for all the ideas and support. I want to move on from prepper hoarding to prepper living.
Absolutely! Try to layer the leaves with some kind of manure, if nothing else, buy some cheap steer or chicken manure at the hardware store.
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Old 10-10-2018, 08:34 PM
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Air rifle, doesnt have to be super high end. Or dog.
Best dog i knew was found turned loose and starving in woods. Only fault was ever after if he saw a squirrel or rabbit he would take off and only come back when he had bloody scraps of fur.
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Old 10-11-2018, 02:45 PM
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I highly suggest looking into growing organically, also looking into Permaculture methods, composting methods, organic soil amendments and additives, etc.

It's the most sustainable way of growing, if done properly.

If you have any questions, just ask.

I live in a zone2b area (subarctic) and I can grow most veggies and fruits here; if I plan accordingly. I can grow almost anything indoors as well, under some grow lights.

There's several things you could do to improve your odds; planting with the USDA hardiness zones (plant things that will definitely grow in your area), learn how to make and use compost (quality compost), use winter growing techniques (look into Eliot Coleman's stuff), mulch to hold in water/warmth/add material to the soil, actually taking care of your plants (you'll have far more success, plan for this-a group of people would be much better than going at it alone), plant periennels (they don't take too much work and can be harvested for many years'; I have a rhubarb about 40 years old, and a chokecherry that's about 20 years old, I also have Siberian pea hedges (edible peas, if cooked; also nitrogen fixing).

Honestly, it's better to take care of your garden than not.

Look at the Market Gardener. A man in Quebec makes over 100k profit on 1.5 acres; and its only worked by him, his wife, and two interns. Living Web Farms on youtube has a series with him, check it out.
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:17 PM
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You might check with your closest feed and seed store and just see what kind of vegetable seed they carry especially if they sell it by weight, teaspoon or tablespoonful instead of in packets. They usually carry the varieties that grow best in your area and buying it that way costs a lot less than packets.

Many stores that carry packets are just buying and reselling displays and those varieties may or may not grow well for you. If you start with the local seed and get the hang of growing those and get a feel for what works for you, then you can start branching out to the more exotic stuff in catalogs and experimenting.

Talk to gardeners near you and see what they grow. Most gardeners would be pleased as punch to show you their garden and chat with you about what they grow and don't grow and why! Free information and a good resource.
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Old 10-11-2018, 10:05 PM
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Don't give up. We've ALL had failures. Even those of us who have been gardening for decades have bad years. Last year, we had the biblical plague of locusts (grasshoppers) that decimated my garden. The only thing they DIDN'T wipe out was the asparagus. What the grasshoppers didn't eat, the rabbits finished off (except the asparagus.) This year, the grasshoppers weren't bad, and my additional fencing kept the rabbits out (although I AM having issues with a pocket gopher that took out one of my blueberry bushes, as well as a few other plants in my garden) and the garden has been producing very well. It varies from year to year. Just keep at it.
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Old 10-12-2018, 07:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Measuretwice View Post
I bought a plastic greenhouse kit that I will try in the spring. Going to buy some barrels to catch rainwater.
Should I leave the little fence I have up and throw all my leaves in it this fall? Will that help the soil?
Thanks again for all the ideas and support. I want to move on from prepper hoarding to prepper living.
Tilling in leaves can be good or not, depending on your soil. If your soil is acidic then adding leaves may be the wrong thing to do. I don't have much experience with acidic dirt but others here do.

You can easily determine your soils PH with a simple test kit from garden supply stores. MOST plants do best in soil around neutral - 7.0.

If your soil is basic, PH above 7.0, then tilling in leaves will lower it. Not overnight, not even in one growing season, it will take a few years, but can be the best thing you can do for your garden.
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Old 10-12-2018, 08:36 AM
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An old farmer once told me: The biggest reason a farmer fails is he plants more than he can tend. Gardening is work even if it is just a hobby or planting a few tomato plants.
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Old 10-12-2018, 10:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesky9 View Post
Deer and coons are a big problem In the country, too. This summer, we installed a 5 foot high (2 inch x 4 inch weave) around our 1/2 acre garden and orchard. Expensive, yes, but works great. Have not had one critter eat my garden in three months.
I have this same fencing... 2 or three acres worth..
Run it through the thicket, and the deer aren't going to mess with it, once they run into it a few times...

But, the raccoons, possums, armadillos are a different matter.
Raccoons and possums can be trapped with a havahart trap, drop entire trap in goldfish pond, go dig deep hole... Fertilizer...
Armadillos are a whole different matter, horrible invaders, tear up the entire garden, nearly impossible to trap... Some people go the electric fence route...
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Old 10-12-2018, 10:39 AM
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I have this same fencing... 2 or three acres worth..

Run it through the thicket, and the deer aren't going to mess with it, once they run into it a few times...

SNIP
The deer donít just jump over it? The deer where I live jump right over 4 and 5 foot fences and Iím told they can jump over 6 footers though Iíve never witnessed it. To be fair Iíve never ďwitnessedĒ them jumping a 5 footer either but I put a 4 foot fence at the top of a steep hill and they jump right over that to get at the plants, which are mostly Hostas in that area. Maybe it has more to do with whatís on the other side and how badly they want to get to it.
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Old 10-13-2018, 08:41 AM
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The deer donít just jump over it? The deer where I live jump right over 4 and 5 foot fences and Iím told they can jump over 6 footers though Iíve never witnessed it. To be fair Iíve never ďwitnessedĒ them jumping a 5 footer either but I put a 4 foot fence at the top of a steep hill and they jump right over that to get at the plants, which are mostly Hostas in that area. Maybe it has more to do with whatís on the other side and how badly they want to get to it.
In other contexts on SB, Iím sure youíve read the mantra 2=1;1=0. Applied to fencing for deer, it may be that a thoughtfully planned double fence will keep out the unwanted quadrupeds. E.g., in Niki JabbourĎs ďGroundbreaking Food Gardens: 73 Plans That Will Change the Way You Grow Your GardenĒ, one of them includes double fencing to keep out the whitetails....
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Old 10-14-2018, 08:34 AM
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If deer are jumping a fence use fishing line set 18" off the ground about 3' from the fence all the way around your fences outer perimiter. Deer won't jump the distance and they don't like feeling something they can't see.

This guy uses 30 lb. monofilament only for a deer fence. Again, they can't see it but can feel it.

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Old 10-14-2018, 09:03 AM
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I'm still learning at 62! Last year I had deer problems here in town. This year I bought some $2 sidewalk lights (Dollar General) and put them around the perimeter of the garden. It keeps the deer away at night. Not a deer this year.
I also made the mistake of putting my new garden too close to a big tree. Bad mistake. A tree will suck water from your garden if it's 30 feet away. Stay away from trees.
I've also got bad seedlings from a nursery...they were simply kept in peat pots too long and weren't healthy plants. And I'm always too conservative with water.
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Old 10-15-2018, 08:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don H View Post
If deer are jumping a fence use fishing line set 18" off the ground about 3' from the fence all the way around your fences outer perimiter. Deer won't jump the distance and they don't like feeling something they can't see.

This guy uses 30 lb. monofilament only for a deer fence. Again, they can't see it but can feel it.
I've tried the monofilament thing and a nine point buck just tore the heck out of it and proceeded munching. Got it on game cam.
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Old 10-15-2018, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Corpus View Post
The deer donít just jump over it? The deer where I live jump right over 4 and 5 foot fences and Iím told they can jump over 6 footers though Iíve never witnessed it. To be fair Iíve never ďwitnessedĒ them jumping a 5 footer either.
the deer have no problem jumping a five foot fence out in the open.

The most important part of my post.... You didn't understand.

I run the fence through the thicket... Trees, shrubs, smilax vines... In town, I run fencing through lines of shrubbery.

If there's no thicket, no shrubbery... Then.... A five foot fence will not work... Even electrified!

I run another 5 foot fence on top of the first with ten foot conduit through both sections of fencing between the posts used to hold up the first fence.

And... I have seen deer jump fences, I've even seen them jump through the wires of a barbed wire fence... And, I've observed where they jumped through electric fencing where the wires were less than 2 foot apart... And... I've observed where they jumped uphill into a tiny courtyard that was a totally blind jump!

Get enough deer, it gets a lot harder to fence them all out.

But... Usually, if you run the fencing through an area where you normally can not walk... You are as good as gold.

When the fence is first put up, you may have to repair it a few times... But after they get tired of running into a fence that they Can not see, they stay away from it.
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Old 09-28-2019, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by HeavyHauler View Post
I highly suggest looking into growing organically, also looking into Permaculture methods, composting methods, organic soil amendments and additives, etc.

It's the most sustainable way of growing, if done properly.

If you have any questions, just ask.
I have a small garden (18'x24'), mainly to grow things as a hobby.

In the last few years I heard a lot about "organic gardening" and "organic soil" but never really understood what it meant beside growing things without using synthetic pesticides and fertilizers.

Through the years I've always used Miracle-Gro to fertilize my garden and Dawn mixed with water to kill aphids and pests.

There are "organic chicken manure", "organic composted cow manure" and all kinds of "organic pesticide" sold for almost twice the price of regular stuff. Are they worth it?

How do you make your soil organic?
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Old 09-28-2019, 11:38 PM
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In the last few years I heard a lot about "organic gardening" and "organic soil" but never really understood what it meant beside growing things without using synthetic pesticides and fertilizers.
Thats all that it means.

Quote:
There are "organic chicken manure", "organic composted cow manure" and all kinds of "organic pesticide" sold for almost twice the price of regular stuff. Are they worth it?
You would have to define 'it'. They are worth it to the manufacturers to sell. Wether they are worth it to you to buy depends on what you want.
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Old 09-29-2019, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Measuretwice View Post
I bought a plastic greenhouse kit that I will try in the spring. Going to buy some barrels to catch rainwater.
Should I leave the little fence I have up and throw all my leaves in it this fall? Will that help the soil?
Thanks again for all the ideas and support. I want to move on from prepper hoarding to prepper living.
So how did this year's garden do? I'd love to hear an update!
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Old 09-29-2019, 11:01 AM
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It's been a hard year for me too! I got to learn about Septoria and Verticillium, and making do with what the weather gives. If you can't plant arugula, try spinach. Of course even spinach can take only so much rain, and my cat lying in it didn't help. Oh well.

I'm an urban gardener, so I have problems with squirrels, chipmunks, and rabbits too. A cheap but reasonably effective option is 3' chicken wire fencing with a nice bird netting over the top. That'll cut most of the little darlings out of your salad bar! Thankfully I don't have a deer problem, and my garden is hidden well enough that it hasn't been found yet by the human thief types. We've been getting a number of transplants from Chiwaukee and crime in the 'hood has risen. I have installed security cameras and if they can't read the NRA sticker on my doors, then they're stupid thieves on top of it.

I've been working to establish asparagus from root this year, and it IS a lot of work. I got my roots from Stark Brothers, and I've had a good sprout. 7/10 in one bed and 6/10 in the other isn't bad. I have been out there every week to weed and thankfully, those beds are somewhat sheltered from wind and rain. So, I'm confident for next year. You can check my garden out on my thread if you're curious. I would also second the Master Gardener training, and your local Extension office will have good information for you too.

Hang in there. Do some research and try again next year. It'll come.
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