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Old 10-22-2016, 12:22 AM
reaper420 reaper420 is offline
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Ok so ive read through some of the articals on here and i have tons of ideas on what i need but i have no idea where to start on my budget. I think my biggest prioty is food and water. I have guns and ammo (ar-15, .22 rifle, 9mm pistol, .22 pistol) eventually id like to get a hunting rifle and a shotgun but ive never been hunting and dont have anyone to teach me how to hunt and prepare the meat. Budget is a big issue for me. Im young just starting life, i make minium wage and still have alot of nesciaties i need to buy like a vehicle. I dont have anyone to help me this is all me on my own. I try to take a breath and take it one step at a time but between the crazy election and threats of nuclear war i get scared im no where close to where i need to be. Ive looked at dehydrated food. Maybe spending 150$ a month or so on that. I know i should be stocking up on rice and beans, peanut butter that type of stuff and i slowly am. If you were in my shoes where would you start? A plan of action would be very helpful and any advice on what to buy for the best price and where would be extremly helpful. I was also curious on how feasable dyhadrated food actually is. Water could be scarce. Ive been consider rations but i know they arnt ideal for long term situations
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Old 10-22-2016, 02:27 AM
BabyBlue BabyBlue is offline
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I tell em all to start with water. You can live for weeks without food but only days without water. At a sporting goods store, or wallmart, get a 7 gal. jug for every person (and large pet) you expect to have in the house. One gal. a day is the minimum needed. 7 gals. gives you at least a week for everyone.

Fill them and put them away, dump in the garden every early spring and late fall and re-fill to keep it fresh tasting. After you have that, read and think what you should do for YOUR household for larger amounts. You may decide to go with 55 gal barrels, you may decide to go with something much bigger. But start with the beginning.

Start now examining what you eat, and how fast you go through things. If it takes you a month to go through a quart of cooking oil you will need 12 quarts to last a year. If you use up 4 pounds of salt in 6 mo. you will need 8 pounds for a year. Decide how long you want this food storage to supply you, and do the math on each item to see what you need to have in your pantry. Knowing your current needs tells you your future needs.

Research, and even test out recipes that your family will enjoy that can be made with shelf stable foods. Learn ways to make dishes you already enjoy from shelf stable ingredients.

Get 14 pieces of paper. Write a different daily menu on each one. You may go with less than 14, but we are aiming for not running into food boredom here. On anther paper write the list of the ingredients for every dish AND THE AMOUNTS. Example: 6 of your daily menus call for eggs, totaling 12 eggs. All 14 daily menus call for a teaspoon of salt, totaling 14 teaspoons of salt. Three of your daily menus call for 1 cup of noodles, totaling 3 cups of noodles.

Buy that list. You will have 14 days worth of food.

Of course you won't buy just 14 teaspoons of salt, you'll buy the largest package logical. Sams Club has 25 lbs. salt for $3 and change. Or you may choose to buy a 4 lb. package for $1.20. The eggs will be powdered and you'll buy a whole can, not just 12 eggs worth.

Next month you buy the list again. The next month, again, until you meet your goal.

You may find another method to plan your storage but I find this one breaks it down into an easy thinking pattern for newbies.
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Old 10-22-2016, 02:43 AM
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First, take EVERYTHING you read on here with a LARGE grain of salt!!!....Second, go back to school!! Sounds like you are trying to fit in somewhere in life.. go back to school, get a good useful degree and get a GOOD job that pays well so you CAN afford to purchase a few things,, Making minimum wage is really keep in you back!!
.. You are too young for all this right now...Once you have a degree will be in a better position to MAKE GOOD DECISIONS!!... from what I read, you ARE NOT making even normal decisions!!

......Do you own a house?? A small plot in the country will go along way in your prepping. (apartments are NOT safe).. your mommies basement is safer!!
Use common sense... THINK LOGICALLY.. what are you trying so survive???.. Economic collapse or Nuclear attack, race war, Hillary's presidency. ??? With so many weapons, CAN you really shoot and KILL someone or are you just pretending?? If you shoot "at" someone who has a gun , they will probably kill YOU.(I would)
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Old 10-22-2016, 04:00 AM
reaper420 reaper420 is offline
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Im working on getting back into school. Like i said im on my own no mommy to support me or pay for school so its easier said than done when i have to worry about having enough money for bills and rent. I admit i probably overract a bit. I live in california thats one of the reasons i started stocking guns and ammo first. They pass more and more ridiculous gun laws here everyday so i did my best to get what i could while i still could. I admit i have alot of learning to do but i wouldnt say im helpless with a firearm. I go out shooting regularly and am familiar with my weapons. I know im not in a position to do serious long term prepping i live in an apartment in the city. i know its far from ideal but it would be nice to have atleast some basics started now just incase. I try to take everything with a grain of salt i realize the media works by making us live in fear but at the same time there is some seriously scary stuff going on right now and our way of life is in danger. Id like to have some kind of plan for survival if things really do start heading down hill. As far as what im preping for the thing that scares me the most right now is a possible war on our soil or a devastating attack on us. Between the threats of nuclear attacks, terrorism and our presidential candidates i admit im a bit scarred right now thats why im seeking advice. Maybe my best bet would be just stock up on rations and water and hopfully learn how to hunt while i get my life on track.
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Old 10-22-2016, 04:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5keepers View Post
First, take EVERYTHING you read on here with a LARGE grain of salt!!!....Second, go back to school!! Sounds like you are trying to fit in somewhere in life.. go back to school, get a good useful degree and get a GOOD job that pays well so you CAN afford to purchase a few things,, Making minimum wage is really keep in you back!!
.. You are too young for all this right now...Once you have a degree will be in a better position to MAKE GOOD DECISIONS!!... from what I read, you ARE NOT making even normal decisions!!

......Do you own a house?? A small plot in the country will go along way in your prepping. (apartments are NOT safe).. your mommies basement is safer!!
Use common sense... THINK LOGICALLY.. what are you trying so survive???.. Economic collapse or Nuclear attack, race war, Hillary's presidency. ??? With so many weapons, CAN you really shoot and KILL someone or are you just pretending?? If you shoot "at" someone who has a gun , they will probably kill YOU.(I would)
I understand what you're saying, and it's good advice under any normal situation, but a degree is not going to help him if things get ugly, and he may not have that much time. He came here for help in prepping, not for scholastic advice. Anyone can prepare to some degree regardless of their income. He has a few guns, so he's already more prepared then a lot of people I know who make a lot more money.

OP, you shouldn't think food and water is your first priority, it IS your main priority. Nothing else matters without an adequate supply of food and water, and anyone can build up a decent supply of that making minimum wage, if you know how to buy.

You need to assess your situation and think reasonably. If you're a city dweller with no place to go, you're most likely not going to make it through a nuclear attack or any long term catastrophe or pro-longed societal breakdown anyway, so stock up the amount of food and supplies for what you think you would realistically need, probably no longer then a few months. You don't need to buy a bunch of dried food that will last a million years. Buy the normal canned food that you wouldn't mind eating anyway regardless of the situation and stock up on that. Make sure you get a good variety. Buy food and bottled water in bulk whenever they have a sale. Check the grocery adds.

Next, you will need some basic medical supplies, cooking devices, utensils, propane, portable generator etc. Get yourself a good Ham/weather alert AM/FM radio. All of these things can be purchased for relatively cheap.

As far as guns go, you already have a good selection. Learn how to use them to the best of their (and your) abilitiy, and stock up on ammo for those. If you are going to buy another one, buy a shotgun. They are cheap and effective. Buy a model with an interchangeable barrel that could be used for different purposes like hunting in a pinch. Forget about a centerfire rifle that is exclusively designed for hunting, as you are not a hunter and don't look like you will become one anytime soon. They require scopes, calibration, etc. and their use is limited.

Above all that, spend some time here and elsewhere reading and learning from other experienced preppers.

Good luck to you.
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Old 10-22-2016, 08:25 AM
Caseyboy Caseyboy is offline
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5keepers,
As a fairly newbie to this forum perhaps you don't find much wisdom in these postings personally but many through the years have. There are lists done up in detail, you might want to check out a few of them, they are suggestions presented with excellent advice and so many "how to" articles it is nearly impossible to read them all. Of course, there are a few of those who think they know it all and that is sad, to say the least. Those members here that spend the time to give honest and accurate information to those among us who admittedly do not have the knowledge to begin a lifelong effort of prepping are those people such as yourself who might benefit enormously from those words of wisdom. Perhaps you should read a little more and keep shallow opinions for others who might want to discuss your views more in depth to yourself.

With what it takes in cash, think of all the preps one could amass with that much money not to discount the time expended.

A degree today is hardly worth the effort or time expended for such nonsense. I would have agreed with you several years ago particularly if you encouraged a newbie to get a degree in Mechanical Engineering, Medicine or perhaps advanced mathematics. Those would be useful anytime and in any circumstances. Today, the college students come away with degrees that are worthless and expensive and have no socially redeeming value other than an ego massage. The standards have been reduced so significantly they are relegated to a monumental waste of time and a colossal waste of money. Twenty years ago yes, today, no.

Cheap advice is simply that, a worthless endeavor to enhance the self-esteem of the one handing it out. I would concur with the other postings advising the newbie to concentrate on food and water before I would suggest a degree. Additionally, a well aimed and functional Colt .45 will be much more valuable if things unravel in society than a parchment with some words on it.
Caseyboy
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Old 10-22-2016, 09:18 AM
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Kalashnikov47 Kalashnikov47 is offline
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I heard from a really wise prepper once that the first thing you should buy is a 5 gallon bucket, its cheap and gets you started...there, now you have a starting point...
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Old 10-22-2016, 09:28 AM
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Ian Treloar Ian Treloar is offline
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You could also look for opportunities to invest in yourself by learning new skills sets that will help you when you must rely on your own abilities to get things done.
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Old 10-22-2016, 09:45 AM
Geezer Ray Geezer Ray is offline
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Not sure I can help you with prepping suggestions because I am learning also. I can suggest that even without some type of degree you can be very successful IF you have a skill to sell. Learn a trade or a skill and you instantly become more valuable than minimum wage. You must have something to market yourself with or you will always be replaceable with minimum wage or a robot. Good luck with your journey and remember no one on this earth is in control. That's a good thing!
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Old 10-22-2016, 09:47 AM
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Quote:
I try to take a breath and take it one step at a time but between the crazy election and threats of nuclear war i get scared im no where close to where i need to be. Ive looked at dehydrated food. Maybe spending 150$ a month or so on that. I know i should be stocking up on rice and beans, peanut butter that type of stuff and i slowly am. If you were in my shoes where would you start?
1) Calm down.
2) The most likely things are going to be natural disasters and weather issues. Winter storms, earthquakes, tornadoes, floods, etc. Figure out what your area is prone to.
3) Figure that those events are going to shut down the supply routes into town and kill the utilities until a little while after they are over.
4) During such conditions, you will need food, water, light, heat, shelter and a place to poo.
5) Scroll up and read Chris L.'s post again if you haven't.

A)-WATER- 1 gallon of drinking water per person per day. Let's say 2 weeks worth.
Also, find a local water source (other than your pipes) and the means to render it drinkable.

B)-FOOD- Hit up the sales and coupons. Stock up on whatever canned and dry foods (rice, pasta, etc.) to get you a good pantry of lets say two weeks, for the number of people you expect to be feeding.

C) Light/Heat. Have an alternate means of lighting the interior of your shelter, and a means of heating your shelter and your food without either burning it down or suffocating yourself.

D) Security. Means of locking up your stuff. Get a gun safe (or at least a metal lockbox?) for your guns while you're at work? Ammo and training for what you have.

E) A 1st Aid kit and a fire extinguisher.
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Old 10-22-2016, 10:46 AM
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A lot of good advice here and a bunch of good people on this forum. I'm fairly new here myself. I've had loose handshake relationship with becoming more prepared for a couple decades now and the best thing I can suggest is to relax and take an objective look at where you're at. If I understand correctly you're in an apartment in a city without a vehicle so hauling a bunch of stuff is going to be a pain. If the idea is to set yourself up to stay put for a while think about that. Water for a week or two, canned food, warm clothes, a small multi-band radio and a led flashlight might be a good place to start. The list of "stuff" goes on and on but where can you put it and can you take it with you becomes an issue too. Learning and PRACTICING skills long enough to make them truly yours doesn't have to cost much and skills are easily portable. They might make you the most valuable person in the crowd if life goes south. Best of luck and God bless.
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Old 10-22-2016, 10:52 AM
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Without your own home and good pay, it would be hard (and perhaps unwise) to prep for long term, all out, everything you could ever need, kind of event when you have so many other things to buy. After all, eotwawki will likely not happen in our lifetime. Don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with going all out if you can afford it. I have to prioritize because I have three kids, one in college and two more that will hopefully be in college or trade school. I also want to retire in the next 20+ years or so I have to prep on the cheap as well. I'm more of a mid term / supplemental prepper.

Everyone will tell you, water first. I recommend refilling 2 litre soda bottles and juice bottles with tap water. Milk jugs break down a lot faster so I avoid them. A Sawyer Mini water filter runs about $20 at Amazon or Walmart and will make water that us not chemically contaminated safe to drink.

Learn to love ramen. It's available at the dollar tree at 5/$1 (1900 calories for a buck). So for the price of a hot pocket or a McDonald's cheeseburger (regular) you can eat one ramen and put 4 into storage. They last for years if kept in low humidity and fairly cool.

Rice is awesome but needs cooked. I've stored it for three years and counting in soda bottles. I heat the throttles up with a 100 watt lightbulb before sealing it to drive out moisture. Each bottle spends a week or so in the freezer to kill bug larvae.

Oatmeal will last 1-2 years beyond printed date. This may be extended in soda bottles as well. I pay under $1 a pound at Sam's Club or Wal-Mart.

Pinto beans are the cheapest bean but I'm told they get really hard when stored.

Cooking oil doesn't last forever but it is a cheap source of fat. Keeping a bottle on hand could really help out.

Hot sauce makes everything edible.

Those are my basic cheap preps I can think of. Besides that I try to buy extra of everything when it's on sale or I get to walmart. There was a really good sale on peanut butter so I bought a year's plus supply. There are a few bottles of salad dressing, ketchup, etc. In my storage.

Just keep in mind, if you have a months worth of food, it may not be perfect, but it will keep you going through 99% of the disasters and give you a leg up on most people should it become a long term disaster.
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Old 10-22-2016, 01:26 PM
IamHamp IamHamp is offline
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Are you close to an ALDIs store? ...great place for rice, pasta, dried beans, canned meat etc.
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Old 10-22-2016, 03:06 PM
1A$$2Rsk 1A$$2Rsk is offline
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If you are seeking solid information and resources you can utilize, and you don't mind working to earn them... try this:

Google "Your Community Name" CERT

CERT is Community Emergency Response Team

In our area you can get HAM radio training, the local community hot zones and evacuation routes, and probably get to know folks at the EOC (Emergency Operations Center)

It's not a perfect start, but it's a start... and if you are working side by side with LEO and Firefighters as CERT you do get to see a different picture regarding Emergency Response and the available resources.

CERT is like Infragard - Free training and exposure to relevant resources that many overlook.

Hope that helps you out...
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Old 10-22-2016, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamHamp View Post
Are you close to an ALDIs store? ...great place for rice, pasta, dried beans, canned meat etc.
Another vote for Aldi
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Old 10-22-2016, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris L. View Post
I understand what you're saying, and it's good advice under any normal situation, but a degree is not going to help him if things get ugly, and he may not have that much time. He came here for help in prepping, not for scholastic advice. Anyone can prepare to some degree regardless of their income. He has a few guns, so he's already more prepared then a lot of people I know who make a lot more money.

OP, you shouldn't think food and water is your first priority, it IS your main priority. Nothing else matters without an adequate supply of food and water, and anyone can build up a decent supply of that making minimum wage, if you know how to buy.

You need to assess your situation and think reasonably. If you're a city dweller with no place to go, you're most likely not going to make it through a nuclear attack or any long term catastrophe or pro-longed societal breakdown anyway, so stock up the amount of food and supplies for what you think you would realistically need, probably no longer then a few months. You don't need to buy a bunch of dried food that will last a million years. Buy the normal canned food that you wouldn't mind eating anyway regardless of the situation and stock up on that. Make sure you get a good variety. Buy food and bottled water in bulk whenever they have a sale. Check the grocery adds.

Next, you will need some basic medical supplies, cooking devices, utensils, propane, portable generator etc. Get yourself a good Ham/weather alert AM/FM radio. All of these things can be purchased for relatively cheap.

As far as guns go, you already have a good selection. Learn how to use them to the best of their (and your) abilitiy, and stock up on ammo for those. If you are going to buy another one, buy a shotgun. They are cheap and effective. Buy a model with an interchangeable barrel that could be used for different purposes like hunting in a pinch. Forget about a centerfire rifle that is exclusively designed for hunting, as you are not a hunter and don't look like you will become one anytime soon. They require scopes, calibration, etc. and their use is limited.

Above all that, spend some time here and elsewhere reading and learning from other experienced preppers.

Good luck to you.
Did you miss the part about this man making minimum wage?? Did you really read his post... Too many misspelled words (we have spell check) shows a lack of education and maybe why he makes minimum wage.. Try helping him prepare for his future!! Geeehhhzzz Chis,, help the kid, he can't afford very much now.. and you are telling him to buy this, that, and more!?!?!??
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Old 10-22-2016, 03:35 PM
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Make A Plan/Prepping 101 by Jerry D Young

So you have realized that becoming prepared for whatever might occur in the future is something you want to do. But how to go about it? It can be an overwhelming subject. So it is almost imperative that you make a plan on how to proceed. You are more likely to save money and get what you need as quickly as possible if you sit down, think things out, and come up with a flexible plan suited to your particular circumstances. Plans will be different for every individual or family.

How do you make a plan? One step at a time. Reading this is your first step. The next ones will guide you through the process of putting down on paper, or in the computer, those things you will need to do to get to the state of preparedness you want.

Some assumptions that I think are reasonable that should be taken into consideration when you make your plans:

ē The overwhelming majority of preps will be needed for situations that occur at home.

ē Most disasters will not be Doomsday, The Apocalypse, TEOTWAWKI or WROL situations.

ē Most disasters will still have police and National Guard units enforcing law & order.

ē People will still be responsible for their actions legally and morally.

ē There will looters and violence in some major disasters, but the proportion of life & death incidents will be much smaller than the number of incidents requiring basic human needs.

ē Most households will have some basic items at home that can be used during a disaster. Not everything has to be purchased for use only during one. You can often incorporate into the preps items you already have. (Basic First Aid kits including some OTC & any needed prescription meds. A flashlight or two & some candles. A knife. Bedding)


The actual plan:

1. Threat Analysis:
Sit down with your loved ones and have a discussion about the current situation and what fears and concerns everyone has. No one can prepare for everything, especially in the beginning. Make note of what the things brought up in the conversation. Donít need to scare anyone, and it could be difficult to get them to admit to any fears, especially the younger ones. But it is important to include them, because not everything you will want to prepare for is life and death.

Forget about Doomsday Preps, Armageddon, or TEOTWAWKI for now. Keep it real. Do the best you can to decide what reasons you would bug-out as opposed to bugging-in. Bugging-in is the much preferred action, but there are very good reasons to bug-out. Consider what would drive you from your home, based on your location and situation.

2. Prioritize:
Once you know the things you want to prepare for, put them in a general groups of what you want to start with, what can wait a while, and what should be put on the back burner for the moment. Trying to do everything at once is likely to overwhelm and discourage everyone. You donít want that. A steady progress to each goal you set will get the job done. And I will suggest a couple of goals right off the bat. One is learning and getting all the training you can. Classroom, internet, and book as well as hands on. The other is part of the first. Begin acquiring a good library of prepping books and magazines to read and learn from as part of your educational program, as well as storing them for future use.

3. Goals:
And keep things goal oriented. Set the goals, realistic ones. Goals that can be achieved. Leave the pie in the sky super deluxe bunkers and Mad Max vehicles to the fiction writers. You want something that you can achieve, on a timely basis. Set the level of preparedness you want for the first group of priorities. Once you know where you are going, you can start getting ready to get there. Set some general achievement goals on a timeline to get started. And remember that goals should be realistic to start with, but can be adjusted as things change, you learn more, or things happen that call for a change in the plan.


4. Budget:
This is an extremely important part of the process. A budget is a good idea for all financial matters, but is even more so when trying to get ready for things that might just happen before you are ready for them. You will need to spend some money. But you canít let other things go, either. Still have to pay the mortgage or rent, the auto loan, and on and on. Get them in the budget. Everything you must pay on a weekly, monthly, quarterly, or yearly basis.

Donít forget taxes, and the unexpected. And donít give up everything you like to do. You still need to live a life, especially with a family. Once you have a household budget, you can determine how much you can spend on preps for given timelines. Then you start doing a separate budget, using those numbers, to get the things done you need to do.

Before you put many numbers in, you are going to have to decide on the items you want first, but get the budget set up, and keep it flexible. It will change over time. Once you have a reasonable budget lined out, add the timeframe and amount for the long lead items that you plan to purchase and start saving a budgeted amount per month for that item/those items.

5. Start Prepping
Once the basic plan is in place and the budgets set up, start prepping.


Prepping 101 by Jerry D Young

The best place to start is usually getting the basic human needs taken care of first, no matter what scenario you are preparing for. First you need to figure out what those are, but that is pretty easy. I have a list. The rest can come when you have learned more and not only have, but have practiced with, the initial items.

Begin to study and learn all you can now, and as you go along. Preps without knowledge arenít nearly as effective as they are when you know the why-to and when-to in addition to the how-to. Do not feel like you must do everything in the order listed. You will need to do many of the things, especially these first ones, concurrently. Some things can wait, depending on your specific situation, but the basic human needs should all be met as quickly and completely as possible.

1. Air:
Fortunately, it is still free and available, for the most part, for most scenarios. If there is a problem with air supply, special equipment and supplies are necessary. Not a beginnerís subject.

2. Water:
Has to be contaminate free, naturally or with other means. And a lot of it. Store a lot, locate a reliable future source, get water treatment/purification. A few 15-gallon water drums, a couple of stainless steel water bottles with cups for the BOBs, a quality water purifier, either a high cap camping filter or a combination of a drip filter for the BIB and a smaller hikers filter for the BOBs. Scout out locations for long term supplies of water.

3. Food:
You can go for a while without it, but not long or you become useless. No cook, add hot water only, & easy-cook shelf stable foods, heavy on meats, fruits, and comfort foods. For both BOB and BIB. Buy in bulk or in case lots when possible. At the least, buy extra of the things you want and use on a daily basis when they are on sale. To build up longer term supplies, double buy each grocery day. Soon you will have a good pantry.

Learn to garden and grow as much as you can as soon as you can. Ditto home canning when you get the garden going. Don't be afraid of the commercially produced crops like wheat and oats. You can grow non-hybrid/organic types in a home garden.

4. Sanitation:
You gotta go when you gotto go. You need the safe means to do so. Chemical toilet, TP, hand washing means, bug spray, antiseptic cleaners, shovel to bury wastes. Toiletries. Charmin camperís toilet paper and cleansing wipes for the BOBs. Infectious diseases protection supplies, face mask, gloves, goggles and hand sanitizer. And the ladies, and especially soon to be ladies, need large supplies of their needs on hand.

5. Environmental protection:
You need appropriate clothing as well as housing. Sometimes it is more important than food or sanitation in extreme circumstances. This includes being able to make and control fires. The right clothes for the season. Basic camping gear in case the house becomes unlivable.

You are probably already doing the right clothes for the given season, though here in Reno I see people going from heated homes to heated cars, to heated business and back again wearing a T-shirt, shorts, and flip-flops in 20 degree weather with snow on the ground and coming down hard (I am not joking). Have what you need to keep you comfortable in the weather.

And the camp gear is for when the house cannot be lived in and you need to camp out in the back yard or evacuate. Or even stay in the house when nothing is working. Fallout/blast shelters, like air purification, are another specific topic that deserves separate consideration. Put it in the budget, and start saving, but donít short the other equipment and supplies unless war is imminent.

6. Security:
Beside protection from the elements, there can be a need for protection from dangerous animals, including other humans. Light is your friend. If you cannot see the threat, you cannot protect yourself from it. Lights and vision devices are an important part of a security plan, as well as all around useful. Once you know you can see it, you can get the actual means to protect yourself from those things in your threat analysis you decided were the biggest dangers. From wild domesticated animals, wild animals, and self-defense in those cases where it might be needed. Training, weapons, defensive measures. For some this is a much higher priority. Evaluate your needs and make the decision.

They tend to be expensive, so set up a long range budget and start saving money for them now, even if you canít get it yet due to the overall expense. But as soon as you can, get something that is at least reasonably effective, even if you prefer something else in the future. Donít put off protection items to get the penultimate weapons system. Train, train, and train some more with them. And donít forget Operational Security. Be very careful who you let know you have preps. There can be repercussions if other people do know.

7. Fire/Lighting/Sharps:
These are important for safety and utility. You will want several means to start a fire, and a couple of items to contain fire. Fire steel, Lifeboat matches, lighters with some tinder for the BOBs. To heat one room in the house, an indoor safe propane or kerosene heater with a supply of fuel stored outdoors.

You will need lighting for indoors & outdoors. A couple of crank flashlights for both BIB and BOB, candles, propane lanterns, battery lanterns. Tactical lights for defense. Get some lighting specifically for preps, even though you probably already have a couple of flashlights with weak batteries and non-working bulbs.

You will need sharps to cut with. Knives/SAK/Multi-tool, axe, saw, etc. Iím fairly sure you have a knife or two in the house. Probably suitable for most uses, except lacking a sheath. But there are some blades that are better for field use and Swiss Army Knives (SAKs), and multi-tools can be handy, and if you need to build shelter or an outdoor fire, axes and saws will save you much labor.

8. Heat/cooling/Cooking:
There quite probably will be a need to maintain acceptable temperatures in home and in the field such as indoor safe propane and kerosene heaters. Gas grill w/tanks, various camping stoves for home or field to cook food when possible (but not in the house). No-cook, and add-hot-water-only foods are desirable in the early stages of a situation. But a hot drink and hot meal can raise the spirits and supply needed warmth in many situations. Not critical at first in some climate, but nice later on.

Others will need to up this on the priority list if in a cold climate and suitable clothes for the weather wonít be available. This could include a generator in addition to non-electrical means so a refrigerator, freezer, AC, stove, medical equipment, fans, etc. can be operated.

9. Medical:
Maintaining everyoneís good health should be a priority all the time. But in some of the scenarios you probably came up with include medical emergencies. Knowledge and the right tools are literally life and death in some instances. Extensive first-aid kits, heavy on the trauma treatment for at the scene and in both BIBs & BOBs and the rest of the alphabet.

These are supplemental kits to your regular home first aid kit. Itís is fine for minor cuts, abrasions, stings, and bruises. In a disaster the injuries are likely to be not only worse, but in great numbers. Stock up with quality in mind and with as much quantity as is possible. Another item to budget early on to get a bit later. And get some training.
Make sure to rotate items that have expiration dates. You can use some of the outdated items in training exercises. Dispose of over the counter medication and any sharps safely.
A note on prescription medications. Unlike OTC meds, prescriptions medications are limited to how much that can be obtained and stored. Some things, like narcotics, are limited to a single 30-day prescription. Other prescriptions can often be written for a 90 day supply. Work with your doctor to get as large of a supply of your prescription medication as you can get and can afford.

10. Morale/Welfare/Recreation:
If you need to be using preps, that means there is a lot of stress involved. The means to help relieve that stress can be very important. Games, some small toys and some paper and pencils, religious books, movies, books. Something to keep the kids quiet and busy, adults entertained or comforted, or just to break the monotony.

There are many more things on the list, but the first ten are the most important, in most circumstances. If your threat analysis includes certain scenarios, things like HAZMAT preparations climb up into those first ten

Some of the additional needs:

11. Information/communication:
We live in a society. You need to know what is going on around you. Radios can provide that service, though there are a few other ways. A wind up radio with NOAA weather alert (this could easily be the first item you should get if youíre in tornado alley or where coastal hurricanes occur), AM/FM, Short wave & a set of FRS/GRMS or MURS radios works for both BIB & BOB, Amateur Radios for LR comms, Binoculars, maps, compass, GPS, flares/mirror/smoke/whistle.

Forewarned is forearmed. If you know it is coming the better you can deal with it. And if you are lost or separated or trapped, having the means to signal will get you back a lot faster.

12. Transportation:
You may or may not be able to stay where you are, though it is usually the best in many scenarios. But some call for evacuation, often suddenly. Not only vehicular, but alternative means, with a way to carry the gear in addition to the people. A vehicular BOV if possible, Motorcycles, bicycles, animals, on foot.

Since, in my opinion, the majority of disasters do not call for bugging out long distances, if at all, transportation is down here on the list. If you live in a tsunami zone, near an active or soon will probably be active volcano, you might want to up the priority level. And if you have children or pets or both, evacuation on foot is very difficult and calls for some more sophisticated measures.

I consider LBE (Load Bearing Equipment) part of transportation. This is equipment to carry your gear and supplies when in the field. BOB/BIB/GHB/INCH bag/GOOD bag, etc. Packs, travois, game cart, bicycle. I am a proponent of taking more than what you can comfortably carry in a back pack. Especially if you have children. Definitely consider having some type of cart to carry heavier weights than you can on your backs, and give the little ones a chance to get off their feet.

13. Tools/Hardware/Cordage:
Besides fire/lighting/and sharps, you will need tools to fix things with, and some hardware to make the repairs to keep the above items in good repair, available, and useable. To get you out if youíre trapped in, to get in to someone that is trapped. Tools and parts to make and repair items. 100+ feet of 550 cord for the BOBs, plenty of rope of several types for general use.

Not everyone knows how to use many of the specialty tools, or are physically unable to. These are primarily for at the scene of a disaster, but some items can be carried in the evacuation kits for minor things on the road. This also includes fishing equipment/hunting equipment/traps/game prep equipment, wild edibles books and gathering equipment, etc for gathering wild foods.

14. Camping gear:
You may not be able to stay in your home, for a variety of reasons. Having adequate camping gear for the family, whether staying in the back yard or when bugging out, can keep you out of a community shelter and simply make life easier. The gear addresses most of the basic human needs, just in a relative portable package. And much of the gear can be used indoors if need be if the power and other services are out. And if you do need to bug out, in bad weather, the gear can be lifesaving.

15. Important Documents:
Having documentation after a major event can be critical for getting help, or avoiding problems. You will need to have originals or copies of IDs for everyone, contact lists, copies of insurance cards, etc. There are several lists of what you need to have. This is another thing that, though probably doesnít need to be budgeted for (except to get replacement birth certificates and passports) does need to be planned out and executed over time.

You will be working with agencies of the government and big business with some of them and it just takes time. Start early and finish when you can will hopefully be good enough. It is serious enough for me to remind parents about childrenís immunization records. Those could be a big deal.

16. Education & Reference Works:
You are going to need to how to do a lot of different things during and after a major event. Start accumulating as you see books and things on sale. Read over them and then put into good storage. Practice those things that are advantageous for ordinary times. Gardening, home canning, auto repair, and wild food gathering and the list goes on. This is long range planning. If you donít already know how to hunt and fish, and process wild foods, you might want to work it into your schedule as you get more prepared.

17. Finances:
You will need assets during and after an emergency situation. Cash, gold coins, silver coins, a debit card. This is special disaster related finances, not your everyday household budget, which should already include an emergency fund for every day happenings such as car repairs. The things listed can, in various circumstances, be of great help. Or not. It is all situational. Some will take cash but not PMs, and some will take PMs but not cash, some wonít take either. Try to have something set aside if you have to evacuate.

And then there is barter: After a major event, there may be times when cash or precious metals just wonít do. People will be wanting things. This is quite low priority, compared to most of the other things on this second list, but you might want to stock some items to barter/trade to get things you need. For those that donít think precious metals or cash will be any good, and to just have when having is better than not having. Donít tie up juniorís college fund for it, but look at some of the many lists on the forums that address trade and barter.

18. Spares:
Donít forget spares. Spares for everything that uses consumables plus spare parts for critical items. Once you get Ďthingsí, it doesnít end. Some will need routine maintenance, some rotation, and some spare parts and extra consumables such as batteries, bulbs, wicks/mantles, fuels.

19. Special Situation Gear:
There are several situations that might come up, depending on what actually happens in the particular disaster, that the more or less normal preps donít address. Things like the need to climb or rappel, either in the field or within high-rise buildings. Special medical supply and equipment needs for a member of the family, including pregnancy and birthing gear. Specific wild animal threats in an area. Specific climatic/weather threats in an area.

Some of these special situations require specific plans and gear that should be analyzed and budgeted for, then acquired, especially HAZMAT/CBRNE (Hazardous Materials/Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive) CBRNE gear. Chemical can include transportation accidents, fires, and chemical weapons. Biological can include the common cold up to epidemics, pandemics, to biological weapons. Radiological can include radiation leaks at nuclear power plants, and ďDirty BombsĒ. Nuclear includes all the ďAtomic WarĒ, ďNuclear WarĒ, and ďGlobal Thermonuclear WarĒ scenarios that include direct radiation, blast, thermal radiation, fallout, and several more. Explosives are pretty much conventional bombs and pyrotechnical devices, including Molotov cocktails and IEDs.

HAZMAT/CBRNE gear is extremely important if needed, but expensive and requires training. Radiation sensors, Respirator, protective suit, other PPE. Bucket, brush, bleach to decontaminate. The cleansing items you probably already have. The PPE items are very important if needed. As stated above, if you live in an area where you have to think about nuke plants melting down, up the priority and get them in the budget for acquisition as soon as possible.

20. Humanitarian Aid:
This is a tough subject and tied closely with Operational Security. Should you spend your hard earned dollars on supplies for other people not in your immediate family? Or even your immediate family if they have made the decision to not prep? If you do decide to have things for other people to use, there are risks.

One is that once people know you have supplies, they will want more than you are willing to give. Another is that the authorities could confiscate them. If you do decide to set aside some supplies for others, you must decide how you will get them to the people that need them. One way is to just give the supplies to the people face to face. Might not be a good idea unless they are very close friends and you know they will not be giving out the location of where they got the supplies.

Another is to clandestinely leave the items and hope the right people get them. Another method is to anonymously present them to your local church, soup kitchen, the Salvation Army or other humanitarian agency for distribution.

Yet another consideration, especially if you are giving out the things directly, is do you do the very basics, such as rice and beans, while you are eating canned meats, fruits, and comfort foods? How will people react if they know you are eating better (or have a better situation in many ways) than what you are providing for them? A very difficult situation. You will have to make your own decisions

21. Special Needs:
Donít forget those with special needs. That includes pets, livestock, babies, the elderly, and the disadvantaged. They have the same basic needs that everyone else does which must be met in ways appropriate to their situation. Special foods, medical needs, special clothing and housing. Evaluate occasionally and then obtain, store, and rotate as necessary items for those in your group that have these special needs.

Once into the process of following the budget and the plan is underway, continue to re-evaluate everything on a regular basis. You might need to adjust the budget based on less income, or even higher income, or situations might change that require a change in plans. Prepping isnít static. You arenít ever Ďdoneí. It is a continuing process, just as everything else in life is. Keep it in the back of your mind at all times, and your chances of surviving even some very desperate situations are much higher than the norm.

Just my opinion.
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Jerry D Young
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Old 10-22-2016, 03:43 PM
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charliemeyer007 charliemeyer007 is online now
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When you are one a tight budget, work on knowledge and skills. They are the lightest things to carry on your back. Stuff will eventually run out, know how to grow/harvest/make your own. Good used gear can be a real bargain if you know what your are looking at. Get help selecting if needed. 2 good knives are better than 1 best in the world.

Shop/stock up one sales. Use coupons. Only buy stuff you actually like and use. Rotation will keep your stock fresh, nothing more wasteful than throwing stuff away because it went bad.

Having firearms and ammo is good - better is being able to hit your target on the first shot. Train with both hands and shoulders - shoot at every distance from snake at your feet to as far as you can. Learn to shoot from the hip at least for short ranges out to 30 yards or so.

Evaluate your area for threats and resources such as an up stream/wind chemical or nuclear facility; artisan springs, forage zones.... Use the information to help you plan.

Have places to go by different means and paths. You should be able to survive for 3 days in any weather with your bug out bag.

Learn to pressure can. No power required for storage compared to a freezer.
Learn to sew. You can make your own or repair stuff you have.
Get in shape - lots easier to survive and pack a load if you are in good condition.
Make sure your teeth and eyes are good.
Learn your local forage plants. Have field guides with color pic's will help.
Small game trapping will likely feed you better and easier than hunting.
Learn First Aide - have supplies especially any proscription stuff you need.

Hit the downloads section for tons of manuals on almost anything.
https://www.survivalistboards.com/downloads.php


Have fun; you will never be done - its a way of life.
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Old 10-22-2016, 04:25 PM
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Red Mule Red Mule is offline
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Looks like you have gotten a lot of great advice already and seem to be headed in the right direction.

I would like to add just a couple of things here.
Go with the talents that brings happiness and satisfaction to your life?
Decide on what you are surviving for, yourself, wife/partner and/or family?
I find it best to have someone watching my back,& to help out in times of need.

One more thing, learn to cook in any situation with no wasted food to what you need. As it's said an army marches on its stomach
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Old 10-22-2016, 04:52 PM
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Hick Industries Hick Industries is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5keepers View Post
Did you miss the part about this man making minimum wage?? Did you really read his post... Too many misspelled words (we have spell check) shows a lack of education and maybe why he makes minimum wage.. Try helping him prepare for his future!! Geeehhhzzz Chis,, help the kid, he can't afford very much now.. and you are telling him to buy this, that, and more!?!?!??
I try and offer my best, positive, tuff love advise.

Get a real education. Nothing short of an engineering degree from a well respected university.

I dont want to hear how hard this would be. I have already been there and done that.

But in today's economy, you either get a real education, great job skills and professional certs, or you join the military.

You choose.
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