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Old 02-12-2013, 01:48 PM
NoTea4U NoTea4U is offline
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Sir Thrivalist's thread got me thinking. There's something I do in prepping that I think is uncommon. I intentionally disassemble and reassemble my gear. It helps to understand and address weaknesses before they show.
  • In taking apart my water filter, I found a plastic washer and low grade O-ring were all that separated the good water from the bad. Replaced the washer with stainless steel and bought a few extra O-rings. I also figured out a reasonable preventive maintenance schedule, but I eventually just replaced the device... too important to leave clean water to chance.

  • In disassembling my bike, I found several pot metal (ouch!) components. Now that's a red light if you've ever seen one. Still stunned by the discovery. I replaced most and bought a couple spare parts for weaknesses I could not solve. I should really invest in a more durable bicycle.

  • I could find no issues with my handheld flashlights, but I found a problem with my portable headlamps... rock solid anodized aluminum exteriors containing weak plastic battery holders... the type that get brittle and break with age, cold, or impact. I replaced the battery holders with aluminum.

  • Over time and through use, I've learned where packs tend to rip and that buckles tend to break. So the first thing I do with a new pack is reinforce the seams I believe are suspect and replace the plastic buckles with metal.
You can see from my list that some of this should not have slipped by, but it did. I use my gear often and I'm also a deal hunter. The combination has shown me that some deals are really awesome while others only look awesome. I find the re 'n re process a great way to know I can depend on my gear. Since taking this approach, I've had very little fail in the field.

Winter is a fabulous time to re and re gear, because few people choose to rough it regularly in this season. You'll probably find you don't have to change a lot, but that a few small adjustments can really extend the durability of your gear. Rubberize your handles, or buy a couple extra fuses for within the power supplies, or sometimes do nothing at all. A re 'n re will provide value in all cases, because you will better understand your gear and you'll have time to address the things you feel are important.

What have you found while doing a re 'n re on your gear? Please share your mods and reasons for them. And if your gear is mostly tucked away in packages, get it out for a re 'n re, then field test it!
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:01 PM
SurvivorCraft SurvivorCraft is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoTea4U View Post
Sir Thrivalist's thread got me thinking. There's something I do in prepping that I think is uncommon. I intentionally disassemble and reassemble my gear. It helps to understand and address weaknesses before they show.
  • In taking apart my water filter, I found a plastic washer and low grade O-ring were all that separated the good water from the bad. Replaced the washer with stainless steel and bought a few extra O-rings. I also figured out a reasonable preventive maintenance schedule, but I eventually just replaced the device... too important to leave clean water to chance.

  • In disassembling my bike, I found several pot metal (ouch!) components. Now that's a red light if you've ever seen one. Still stunned by the discovery. I replaced most and bought a couple spare parts for weaknesses I could not solve. I should really invest in a more durable bicycle.

  • I could find no issues with my handheld flashlights, but I found a problem with my portable headlamps... rock solid anodized aluminum exteriors containing weak plastic battery holders... the type that get brittle and break with age, cold, or impact. I replaced the battery holders with aluminum.

  • Over time and through use, I've learned where packs tend to rip and that buckles tend to break. So the first thing I do with a new pack is reinforce the seams I believe are suspect and replace the plastic buckles with metal.
You can see from my list that some of this should not have slipped by, but it did. I use my gear often and I'm also a deal hunter. The combination has shown me that some deals are really awesome while others only look awesome. I find the re 'n re process a great way to know I can depend on my gear. Since taking this approach, I've had very little fail in the field.

Winter is a fabulous time to re and re gear, because few people choose to rough it regularly in this season. You'll probably find you don't have to change a lot, but that a few small adjustments can really extend the durability of your gear. Rubberize your handles, or buy a couple extra fuses for within the power supplies, or sometimes do nothing at all. A re 'n re will provide value in all cases, because you will better understand your gear and you'll have time to address the things you feel are important.

What have you found while doing a re 'n re on your gear? Please share your mods and reasons for them. And if your gear is mostly tucked away in packages, get it out for a re 'n re, then field test it!
I agree that you really should learn how your gear is assembled and check for weak spots. Failure points are just something that will be present in all things. You just have to minimize the risk of failure the best you can. Another thing is to bring along the supplies to repair something that does break. I have a mini sewing kit that I put together for my gear. It has some webbing and 2 different types of thread along with some scissors and various needle sizes. It also includes some different types of material to repair all the different pieces of gear. No matter how tough the material things will wear out.
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:00 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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Right concept, wrong title. A more appropriate title could be: "There's A Mod For That" or maybe even "iMod".

Modifying gear is different (IMO) than repairing perfectly working equipment. For example, the material on the bottom of my pack is the same as the field of my back (725D). I don't like that. So it's going to get a rubber bottom that I will make. I never liked putting it on the ground when I've rested it especially, damp ground. Sometimes, you don't have a tree to hang it from at a stop.

I did a reverse of what you did with your gear. I replaced metal buckles with plastic (a Fastex conversion) for a Hellcat Pack + I carried a pack repair kit (spare material, full buckle set, USGI webbing, sew kit [of course]). Big Ups to you for not being afraid
to add a few ounces to your stuff in order to gain that peace of mind that more durability brings!

I like that though, that you "know" your bits inside/out. I do the same thing. A man has to know his tools. The chances that in a SHTF situation you'll find an REI shop that'll rebuild your pack are none to none. You have to have that Frontiersman mentality and be self-reliant. Sewing, leather crafting, welding, carpentry, metal work, blacksmithing, chemistry, farming, Land Engineering, Geology, Wilderness First Aid, etc...all things every man should know or at the very least, have some sort of introduction in besides just knowing what mushrooms are okay to eat.

Good on you NoT4U! The guy who knows his gear is a real Hombre!
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:02 PM
NoTea4U NoTea4U is offline
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Originally Posted by SirThrivalist View Post
Right concept, wrong title. A more appropriate title could be: There's a mod for that.
Yeah, but I needed something tongue 'n cheek. Your thread gave me an idea I just couldn't resist!
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:06 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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Yeah, but I needed something tongue 'n cheek. Your thread gave me an idea I just couldn't resist!

LOL! No worries! Feel free! I'm glad someone got an idea out of it! But I'm right there witcha' 100% bro.
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Old 02-12-2013, 04:34 PM
SurvivorCraft SurvivorCraft is offline
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Yeah, but I needed something tongue 'n cheek. Your thread gave me an idea I just couldn't resist!
I think the government coined the phrase the best,
"If it ain't broke, Fix it till it is"
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Old 02-12-2013, 08:33 PM
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I will double down and agree. My brother and I are constantly taking it all apart and remaking. We have accumulated a massive amount of stuff that was once employed and now has found its way to storage.. Replaced by lighter, tougher, multi-use, more practical gear.

The same goes for my rifle. I know the first time I battled with my AR on a journey through the mountains with a quad rail on it and some other fixins. Needless to say that rifle is so much lighter now. (Thank You Mag-pul)

I constantly find a new pack that strikes my fancy. My old packs and gear are often repacked as basic starter packs for family and friends that my go along with us on adventures.

My goal has always been go as light as possible while maintaining the plausibility of extended and indefinite wilderness sustainability. I now hover at around 32lbs on the pack in summer. A little more in winter with heavier sleeping bag (which I have also gone through a number of) lol

It is a constant (but very fun and rewarding process)
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:53 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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We have accumulated a massive amount of stuff that was once employed and now has found its way to storage..
Do this bro (recycle it)...























Quote:
My goal has always been go as light as possible while maintaining the plausibility of extended and indefinite wilderness sustainability. I now hover at around 32lbs on the pack in summer. A little more in winter with heavier sleeping bag (which I have also gone through a number of) lol

It is a constant (but very fun and rewarding process)
Nice. Do you have a link on your pack? If not, I'd love to see what your load-out. I'm always interested in saving weight while maintaining durability.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:19 PM
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I hope others will see this thread and post. Great ideas!
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:48 PM
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Originally Posted by SirThrivalist View Post


Nice. Do you have a link on your pack? If not, I'd love to see what your load-out. I'm always interested in saving weight while maintaining durability.
Love the recycle job.

My current pack... And my brothers is actually custom right now. Kind of a DIY job.

I am going to work up a youtube video on it. been meaning to for a while but... I was too lazy to charge camera batteries lol.

A crude explanation is an ALICE FRAME with a medium size MOLLE Pack and additional attachments . . But it is a bit more complicated than that. But your like me you can probably brainstorm up basically the same thing I did.
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Old 02-13-2013, 02:15 AM
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Love the recycle job.

My current pack... And my brothers is actually custom right now. Kind of a DIY job.

I am going to work up a youtube video on it. been meaning to for a while but... I was too lazy to charge camera batteries lol.

A crude explanation is an ALICE FRAME with a medium size MOLLE Pack and additional attachments . . But it is a bit more complicated than that. But your like me you can probably brainstorm up basically the same thing I did.
Thanks.

Nice on that pack. I'd like to see it when you get a chance.

I came up with something: A light, but strong frame with pre-made shoulder straps/waistbelt (maybe MOLLE II or ILBE)
and a removable shelf thingamajig. One could strap their tent, sleep pad & bag and a drybag with the rest of one's gear
(cooking, clothing, etc...) right to the frame then cover it with a standard pack rain cover.

They could also attach a day pack to it for more capacity. It'd only be worth it if it could save substantial weight and carry
a big load including wood & game. I've seen primitive systems like this and just came across the Bull-Pac recently. I'd want
to design mine to be a homemade project possibly out of 3/4"-1" PVC tubing and surplus gear. I like to build my own gear.
Also, I'd like it to be something that would be field repairable for sure with commonly found items.
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Old 02-13-2013, 05:49 AM
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Originally Posted by SirThrivalist View Post
Do this bro (recycle it)...

























Nice. Do you have a link on your pack? If not, I'd love to see what your load-out. I'm always interested in saving weight while maintaining durability.
If you don't mind, can you explain what you did in the pics?
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Old 02-13-2013, 07:17 AM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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If you don't mind, can you explain what you did in the pics?
I store my E-Tool in a Woodland Camo MOLLE II Pouch.

I took the original cover that came with it and cut it up to use as a sheath for the hatchet head. It's shape naturally
lent itself for it and there was a strategically placed button for closure. I traced out the pattern of the head onto the
E-Tool Cover giving it about 1/2" over so I could have room to play with, cut it out, sanded & grinded the rough edges,
then used a heat gun and needlenose pliers to clamp & weld the pieces together.

Once it cooled, I hit it with my Dremmel barrel sanding bit and shaped it up doing my best to try to get as close as
possible to making it presentable. It serves it's purpose perfectly because I had just taken that hatchet and restored
it to better than new, putting an edge so sharp on it that I literally cut my finger while handling it.

The final picture is how I have it modified currently. After using it on a few outings, I felt it really needed some grip
for the handle and I used a Framing Carpenter's tip to give it some strength by wrapping the shoulder with about 18"
of wire then wrapping that with a strip of Gorilla Tape. The grip I wrapped with bicycle handlebar tape, electrical tape
at the top and Gorilla Tape at the knob. Handling it now is a zillion times better now.
















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Old 02-13-2013, 07:21 AM
SharpDog SharpDog is offline
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^^^ I'd say you have an axe to grind ... ^^^
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Old 02-13-2013, 07:32 AM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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^^^ I'd say you have an axe to grind ... ^^^


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Old 02-13-2013, 12:54 PM
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ghost792 ghost792 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SirThrivalist View Post
I came up with something: A light, but strong frame with pre-made shoulder straps/waistbelt (maybe MOLLE II or ILBE)
and a removable shelf thingamajig. One could strap their tent, sleep pad & bag and a drybag with the rest of one's gear
(cooking, clothing, etc...) right to the frame then cover it with a standard pack rain cover.

They could also attach a day pack to it for more capacity. It'd only be worth it if it could save substantial weight and carry
a big load including wood & game. I've seen primitive systems like this and just came across the Bull-Pac recently. I'd want
to design mine to be a homemade project possibly out of 3/4"-1" PVC tubing and surplus gear. I like to build my own gear.
Also, I'd like it to be something that would be field repairable for sure with commonly found items.
You can definitely do that with an ALICE frame. I made one of these up with spare parts I had left over from building a Hellcat. I attached a Spec-Ops HUMP pouch to it to carry a hydration system and I attached a USGI training pack (butt pack) to the top of the frame. I had the MSS carrier rigged to hang below the frame and I lashed my sleeping pads on with some paracord.

Pretty slick setup, especially since I threw it together at the last minute to take some weight off of the Hellcat. Doesn't Dave Canterbury have something like this? I think he might use two buttpacks, though. I know I got the idea originally from something I saw on YouTube.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:04 PM
SirThrivalist SirThrivalist is offline
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You can definitely do that with an ALICE frame. I made one of these up with spare parts I had left over from building a Hellcat. I attached a Spec-Ops HUMP pouch to it to carry a hydration system and I attached a USGI training pack (butt pack) to the top of the frame. I had the MSS carrier rigged to hang below the frame and I lashed my sleeping pads on with some paracord.

Pretty slick setup, especially since I threw it together at the last minute to take some weight off of the Hellcat. Doesn't Dave Canterbury have something like this? I think he might use two buttpacks, though. I know I got the idea originally from something I saw on YouTube.
Yes Dave does. And now, he has it with a Bull-Pac.

I thought about the ALICE frame, but I want to have a much taller profile for the frame since it's going to have things strapped to it. Plus, it'll need more height than width. One of my goals is to keep the kit as narrow as the widest point on my body.



But yeah, just another use for the venerable ALICE Pack. I'll probably do something like that anyway with one.
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Old 02-13-2013, 02:58 PM
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TMcArthur TMcArthur is offline
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It is called preventive maintenance. I don't wait for my gun to start jamming to disassemble and clean it. I don't wait until my car overheats to change my oil or check my radiator fluid or for the tires to go flat to buy new ones. Taking apart and putting together again under controlled circumstances is how you learn to fix something in the field should it break.
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Old 02-13-2013, 06:31 PM
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It is called preventive maintenance. I don't wait for my gun to start jamming to disassemble and clean it. I don't wait until my car overheats to change my oil or check my radiator fluid or for the tires to go flat to buy new ones. Taking apart and putting together again under controlled circumstances is how you learn to fix something in the field should it break.
I agree TM. On the gun part I am individually confident that half of AR and AK owners (today) dont know how to completely field strip their weapon. And I would bet that about 90% would have no clue how to remove a barrel and install a new one. on either platform if they had to. Just my gut instinct.


HAHA

I take apart everything. I have since I was a kid. If it was too complex to put back together then it wasnt worth a dam anyway. lol Throw it away or re-purpose the individual parts.
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Old 02-13-2013, 06:33 PM
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Pretty Clever!
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