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Old 06-19-2018, 04:41 PM
browningv308 browningv308 is offline
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Default Planting in hilled mounds v/s flat ground



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The title makes no sense but this year I expanded the garden with more raised beds. I planted double the amount of everything.
For the plants I in 1 bed used my normal way of planting- just dig a hole put the plant in the ground up to it's 1st inch of stalk all flat no mounds of dirt around the plants.
The other way I planted everything was to ' hill up the dirt ' then plant the plant in the dirt on top of the hills.
So far everything I planted on flat ground is doing good ' plants are growing fast and look good
The plants in the hilled dirt are not growing and seem to be drying out too fast.
Why plant in hilled dirt? Seems everybody does it that way but seems like the plants are happier in flat ground.
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Old 06-19-2018, 04:46 PM
PurpleKitty PurpleKitty is offline
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In Houston they advise us to use raised beds. We can get excessive rain so it makes sense. We also have sticky clay so the plant roots need some good dirt in the raised bed.

I made a raised bed but I never used it, finally my yard guy asked if he could have the cinder blocks. I said Ok and now I have a little hill in my yard.
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Old 06-19-2018, 04:55 PM
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st0n3 st0n3 is offline
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@browningv308 Lot of things that you failed to cover in your post.

At my previous garden in the clay on the side of a hill... I used raised beds...
Made perfect sense... there.

At my present location in the sand hills, where the white sand goes down for 100+ foot...
You couldn't pay me to try to garden with raised beds!
Matter of fact, I tried lowered beds... sadly... didn't work.

so...in the bottomless sand, I spread horse poop, and plant.
I turn soil when I first clear... after that... I try to build top soil, by amend, amend, amend.
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Old 06-19-2018, 05:48 PM
Lugh MacArawn Lugh MacArawn is offline
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Hilled versus flat depends on your local environment.

In areas of plentiful rainfall (not excessive), flat planting would/should be fine. In areas requiring irrigation, hilled (usually rows) works better for the distribution and retention of water.

Here in Central AZ, I usually plant in the gullies of the rows. The local soil slat migrates to the top of the row and I can skim it off periodically and redistribute that soil on the yard. This controls the amount of salt my plants are impacted by AND reduces the amount of water I need to provide the plants because those plants are growing in the gully where the water natural accumulates. Several inches of mulch (roughly 3" on top of the row and 6" on the gully) adds a nice moisture retention barrier to further reduce evaporation.

It all depends on your area.
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Old 06-19-2018, 06:40 PM
browningv308 browningv308 is offline
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We're not talking about planting on the side of a mountain or anything
I'm talking about planting in a raised bed and planting the plants in rows of mounded up dirt v/s just planting the plants in flat dirt.
Grandma and grandpa used to use a hoe to scrape the dirt into mounds or hills then plant the tomato in the middle of the hill. Why do you do that
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Old 06-19-2018, 08:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by browningv308 View Post
Grandma and grandpa used to use a hoe to scrape the dirt into mounds or hills then plant the tomato in the middle of the hill.
Actually they didn't. Some plants should be planted in hills, pumpkins, squash, mellons, & etc. This is for good drainage. Some plants need this. Other vegetables such as tomatoes can/or should be planted deep, then hilled. I drag soil (hill) my potatoes, tomatoes , sweet corn, and numerous other vegetables.

I plant my vegetables on flat ground. I don't advocate raised or container gardens. Although, under certain circumstances, its the only way to grow vegetables.
I recommend reading the book, "Joy of Gardening", by D*** Raymond.
I also invite you to look at my picture albums.

Here is an example.
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Old 06-20-2018, 12:31 PM
Lugh MacArawn Lugh MacArawn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by browningv308 View Post
We're not talking about planting on the side of a mountain or anything
I'm talking about planting in a raised bed and planting the plants in rows of mounded up dirt v/s just planting the plants in flat dirt.
Grandma and grandpa used to use a hoe to scrape the dirt into mounds or hills then plant the tomato in the middle of the hill. Why do you do that
Ah, got it.

As Two Bits mentioned, some plants do better hilled than flat, for various reasons.

The corn I mentioned, does get periodic "hilling" to increase vertical stability. Potatoes get "hilled" to increase tuber growth. Peppers and tomatoes are planted deep. Etc. But, most just get mulch added through out the grow season.

In my raised beds, almost all of them are "bermed" around the edges, to impede water draining off and down the sides and I sometimes still form rows/hills depending upon the plant. Corn is grown in rows, lettuces are planted on flat soil, bush squash is planted flat, vine squash are planted flat if on a trellis or in the raised beds and hilled if planted in my ground level grow areas, etc.

After planting (seedlings for smaller seeded plants and right after planting larger seeds) I apply mulch for moisture retention regardless of where or what planted. As the season progresses, the mulch gets thicker as I add around the plants. By the end of the grow season I am adding soil from an unused area on top of the mulch. Sometimes in the heat of the summer, that mulch is back down to an 1-2" in height - the heat here just goes throw mulch like crazy (I am always picking up grass clippings, leaves, manure, saw dust etc. whenever/wherever I can, if it is free).

Perhaps they had reasons for their methods. Perhaps it was because their parents did.
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Old 06-20-2018, 05:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by browningv308 View Post
We're not talking about planting on the side of a mountain or anything
But, for those who do have hillsides for a garden, terraces can be built to accommodate a garden. Eons ago, before computers, cell phones, and 135mm cameras, I owned 15 acres of this terrible looking gorge/hollow in southern Indiana. I owned both sides of the small hollow. I built a house in the hillside on one side, an 1.5 acre lake in the gorge itself, and used the other side for livestock. The side that used mainly, I terraced. I used sandstone creek rock, railroad ties, and large tile ridge caps from old store buildings. Terraces were about 32" tall and about 5' in width. I made patios, herb gardens, raised perennials, and filler flowers for the flower boutique. This was when I had energy, full of p*** & vinegar.
Here is an idea of what I mean.

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Old 06-21-2018, 04:40 AM
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When I first started gardening a long time ago, my old landlady who was my mentor showed me how to plant in depressions, not hills. Starting in the center, you use your hand in a circular motion to spin out soil and end up with a wide, shallow bowl. Here where it gets so hot and dry, it keeps the water from running off. However if your garden is prone to flooding, planting on a mound of soil would work better.



She also said that while "hills" sometimes meant an actual mound of soil, it was an old term also used for groupings, like "hills" of squash, etc. She preferred planting in bowls so that the plants didn't dry out so fast. For years it has worked well for me both on open garden and in my raised beds.
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Old 06-21-2018, 08:33 PM
edprof edprof is offline
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I've planted in rows on level ground for over 40 years. If everything else is done okay, planting in rows instead of hills has not mattered. I always raise more food than my wife can freeze or can.
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Old 06-23-2018, 04:26 AM
browningv308 browningv308 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedinhoe View Post
When I first started gardening a long time ago, my old landlady who was my mentor showed me how to plant in depressions, not hills. Starting in the center, you use your hand in a circular motion to spin out soil and end up with a wide, shallow bowl. Here where it gets so hot and dry, it keeps the water from running off. However if your garden is prone to flooding, planting on a mound of soil would work better.



She also said that while "hills" sometimes meant an actual mound of soil, it was an old term also used for groupings, like "hills" of squash, etc. She preferred planting in bowls so that the plants didn't dry out so fast. For years it has worked well for me both on open garden and in my raised beds.
That's how I have been doing it for the past several years and it works for my raised beds, this year since I had the space and extra plants I decided to try in the same style of raised beds planting in hilled mounds and those plants just are not doing good. Seems like the plants get too dry too fast.
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Old 06-23-2018, 09:58 AM
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Yeah, use row/hill gardening in wetter climate or if you are able to water a lot. The drainage is better and you don't want to let plants stand in a swamp. Even though it's pretty dry here I use row gardening, but I water a lot..
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