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Old 11-26-2019, 08:07 AM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old fart View Post
Quick Google... Rouladen are available in the States
https://www.google.com/search?q=roul...w=1366&bih=655


In the drafty old house I speak of, I have roll up insulated drapes (homemade) in the 'drafty old bedroom'. There is an amazing difference between drapes up and drapes down comfort level during winter.

I hadn't gotten this far ahead in my thinking of the new structure but I will definitely have them on all the windows. Very effective and they look good too.
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Old 11-26-2019, 08:26 AM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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Originally Posted by Daisy View Post
Mtnairkin, that sounds like a really good plan!

I notice myself, in the winter I live in the "summer kitchen" (small house) which is basically one sizeable room, small kitchen and pantry. In spring, summer and early fall, I live in the main house.


First of all Daisy, I'm glad to see you back posting again. You've been mentioned a couple of times (wondering) on other threads the last couple of weeks.


Your winter solution is very close to what I envision for my new structure. I have a lot of preliminary work to do before I can pour concrete and freezing weather is not conducive to pouring either. Hopefully I can be ready to pour sometime next summer.

I do have quite a bit of experience of living in a similar small space. I have a semi wilderness cabin that I've lived in several years. It's been comfortable at 40 below zero F (C and F coincide at 35 below). Insulated shutters on it that help considerably. Heavily insulated and small interior space takes minimal heat to stay warm. No plumbing there though, I carry water.


PS: I only go there part of the year now.

Last edited by mtnairkin; 11-26-2019 at 10:59 AM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 11-26-2019, 11:21 AM
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merlinfire merlinfire is offline
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there's no question in my mind that wood heat is going to be best if you get it for free, and split it yourself. I know my family currently pays about $600/yr in fuel oil for heating (and I regret it), a wood stove and flue pays for itself in basically 3-5 years at that rate (5 years is if you have it installed), it's a no-brainer. but only if you are putting in the work to get the wood. granted your time probably has value to you, so you kind of need to figure that out, but wood stoves still work when the power is out, so that's a prep, baby!
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Old 11-26-2019, 01:06 PM
Daisy Daisy is offline
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Merlinfire, absolutely agree, if you can get it for free that is the very best, and the work you put in to cut is good exercise and as they say, keeps you warm twice!!

There may be another option, depending where you live. In the country where I live, people don't really have enough land with forest to cut their own fuel, so they buy the logs, which are cut to size, and they themselves chop it.

However, there ARE ways you can get cheap wood for stove if you search a bit. In my case, the next village over from mine has a pallet making facility, and they always have a humoungous pile of scrap wood, I pay the equivalent of about $18 per 1 1/2 cubic meters. My rocket mass heater goes through about 5 to 6 cubic meters a winter, depending on how long the winter is. so about $80/year. I think in the US you can also find similar situations, if you look around. The good thing for me is that this wood from the pallet facility doesn't need to be sawn and chopped. At my age, I don't wanna be choppin wood :D

Here's a link with some possible sources for free firewood in your location:

https://www.thespruce.com/finding-free-firewood-1358009

here is another very useful link about getting free or VERY cheap firewodd: https://ayearwithoutthegrocerystore....free-firewood/
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Old 11-26-2019, 03:34 PM
mtnairkin mtnairkin is offline
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Your own firewood isn't entirely free but it is way ahead of anything else I know of besides sunshine. It takes (usually) a chain saw and replacement chains, gas and oil to run it, a new saw every now and then, usually a pickup to haul it and maybe a splitter (hand or hydraulic).

I burn a lot of wood but split very little. My stove will take large chunks (at least a foot in diameter or a little more).

Over the years, heating with wood has saved me thousands of dollars. When I first bought my farm, the old house had an oil burner in it. The first (fall) night I stayed in it I burned a 5 gallon can of oil and ran out about midnight. Cold night indeed. I got a wood burner soon after and never looked back. The house has never been cold since (and almost free).

I do have a virtually unlimited supply of wood. Many acres of woodland. The only wood I cut is stuff that falls on the roads or on a fence. Much more than I can use just rots in the forest.
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Old 11-26-2019, 04:06 PM
Exarmyguy Exarmyguy is online now
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Live in a berm house.
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Old 11-26-2019, 07:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old fart View Post
Quick Google... Rouladen are available in the States
https://www.google.com/search?q=roul...w=1366&bih=655
It's Rolladen ...

Rouladen are beef roll ups

I don't think we have the right type of house to fit those in, but thanks
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Old 11-26-2019, 10:20 PM
Nomad, 2nd Nomad, 2nd is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merlinfire View Post
there's no question in my mind that wood heat is going to be best if you get it for free, and split it yourself. I know my family currently pays about $600/yr in fuel oil for heating (and I regret it), a wood stove and flue pays for itself in basically 3-5 years at that rate (5 years is if you have it installed),!
My $5,000 Waterford Stanly wood cook/year stove was $100 used, and there are many good stoves under $300 (used)

My stove pipe was <$300 (screwed it together myself) and is 4 winters old.

I will be having a 20'tall masonry chimney made for <$1k

A 2 gal can of chainsaw gas cuts more than a years wood for me.
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Old 11-29-2019, 08:59 PM
KLF KLF is offline
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If for whatever reason you can't heat your home, clear out your living room and pitch a tent inside. Cover it with blankets for extra warmth.

I know a friend of mine who used that few years ago when a tree fell and managed to disable their heating during Christmas day. "Hey kids, we are going camping, in our living room". They had almost zero degrees C inside for couple days but the kids just thought it was all fun and play. I also have a simple free standing tent in storage just in case... never needed it but I won't throw if away either.

Second thing works best if it is considered when the house is actually built:
Geothermal heating/cooling. It will need electricity to work the pump but when it's running it is efficient and fuel-less. It's possible to have AC but without huge power consumption (there is no heat pump to use power, instead it uses cold from the geothermal well). Likewise during winter it will provide with warm water and central heating with the operating costs being power that the water pump uses.

Negatives are definitely costs: drilling wells need special equipment. A ground loop could be done with a backhoe but it isn't as good for cooling. Also the house needs radiators/floor heating or other heat distribution mechanism and it also adds costs.
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Old 11-30-2019, 12:25 AM
William Ashley William Ashley is online now
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Its all about how warm you want to be...

for me I've been spending weather outside down to about 0 f between 0 and 20 f in a leanto that is covered over with tarping. I found that having a ground pad adds a lot of comfort, sleeping bags work as good insultaiton. It can take a bit to heat it up with body heat but the key is to have it a small a volume as possible. (mine is a little bigger than a coffin)

I only have two weeks to go until the end of the school term and then I will once again have warmth before doing my 4 month field placement in a warm climated country.

Still I was a little concerned when the temp was dipping below freezing as this years shelter hasn't been as encased as previous years shelters, much less work, the difference on this one was the use of two thin poly tarps 2mil or so. I'm acutally a bit suprised how much the tempearture difference is between inside and outside. Of course you want atleast two pairs of socks unless you are confident.

I have a project planned for this weekend where I am going to disect a bunch of sleeping bags and add them into one or two bags and putting the insulation in the parts I need it most such as around the feet (today prompted that as I was confused how my feet could be ice cold while the rest of my body was very comfortable, I got use to the cold sensation but was sort of worried perhaps I could return to that one event where my feet literally froze back a few years ago - havn't spent winter in an unheated place since until this year), so stuffing up the lower part. then I want to sow on an over flap that will cover over where the zipper is and maybe add a second zipper point from one of the other bags zippers so that I can not be mummied in but don't have cold air on my back if I turn.

None the less I don't think staying warm while sleeping is as much an issue has staying warm during waking hours without heat. In my experience sleep was the easy thing to do without heat, it is being up in freezing temps that demands activity and over a period of days or weeks it wears down on the mind as every day you are in the cold without modern comforts tends to tire you out more and more. I can see how cabin fever could set in.. over time with no escape to the modern convience of heated buildings and complexes such as colleges, malls and adminsitrative centers that I know I am so use to.


I'd like to see a thread about "how to keep your laptop warm when you are sleeping in freezing conditions" I'm paranoid about rolling onto it. PS laptops can act as dual purpose space heaters.
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Old 11-30-2019, 02:32 PM
KLF KLF is offline
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Replace hdd with ssd and you don't need to worry about much else.

Biggest concern is that if you bring computer from cold to warm, do not turn it on for a few hours so it won't get condensation inside.
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