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Old 10-06-2017, 07:38 PM
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I was down the hill in town today when the University kiddies were shopping for their weekend activities. Their carts were for the most part full of alcohol with frozen pizzas and microwave foods piled on top.

Some of the healthier vegetarian kiddies had lots of 'organic produce', and whole grains in their purchases. There is still a bit of fresh produce in the neighbor's garden which I help with and get access to the veggies from every year. Due to the deer up here, they have an 8 feet tall fence around it and several dogs to keep the deer away from decimating the garden!

Myself at the supermarket I got the sales loss leaders and stocked up on many bulk items, and hit the marked down meats. Of course I had to get cat food and litter, so that my guard cat would not be neglected either.

If I were to use a bread machine my Mom and Grandma would come back to haunt me! Earlier in the thread I had posted pics of my bread and banana bread baking efforts. I need to practice on 'braiding', so that my braided bread looks more professional in presentation. The looks of the braided/ round/ or usual shaped loaves does not affect the taste of the finished product, and I have never had a complaint from those that get a loaf/ just the opposite. I tend to give away a few loaves to close friends and neighbors. I only have 6 Pyrex bread pans, so I may need to buy 2 or 3 more sometime soon. I also use round Pyrex bowls as bread pans, and metal dual thickness cookie sheets to make the braided bread.

As I wrote in an earlier post, I get my AP Flour in 25 pound bags at the restaurant supply place/ 'Cash and Carry', and break it down by putting about 5 pounds in a gallon zip loc bag, and 2 one gallon bags go into a 2 and a half gallon zip loc bag/ plus a few gallon glass jar which holds around 5 pounds each. I go there to the Cash and Carry at other times buying supplies for the Vet's Hall when we have a large event and/ or fund raising dinners. The Vet's Hall has a huge commercial kitchen, and some of us older Vet's can put out quite the meal for up to 100+ folks if necessary! Plus cleaning up afterwards also!

I do find it more inspiring if I cook for more that just myself! When I get together with the family sometimes I cook for up to 13, and make enough for leftovers on the Polish recipes such as 'stuffed cabbage' that the family requests. Luckily I paid attention to what my Mom and Grandmothers showed me to do in the kitchen when I was a snot nosed kid barely able to see over the counter while standing on a step stool.

When I was married, I shared the cooking duties with the ex. When my lady friend comes to visit, I do the cooking here, and ask what she would like during her stay. Just the opposite for when I go to visit her place 80 miles away/ she resides out in the boonies also. Plus being in someone else's kitchen can be confusing at times!

In reading thru the previous posts, there is no 'food delivery' available out here in the boonies! Once in a Blue Moon I may get a take-and-bake pizza if in the mood for one. Otherwise if I did not cook - it would be cold cereal, sandwiches, and microwave foods/ which I do not care for as a steady diet.

Plus being 1/2 Okie and 1/2 Polish (I'm a 'Pokie'), made for some interesting meals at home while growing up! Once a few years ago while staying with my Dad during Thanksgiving, I asked him what he wanted for his Holiday meal. Dad replied with "Pinto Beans, Fried Potatoes, and Cornbread", and that was what we had for dinner that night. Of course, I made a Turkey dinner with all of the trimmings the next day...
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Old 10-07-2017, 11:29 PM
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In reading thru the previous posts, there is no 'food delivery' available out here in the boonies! Once in a Blue Moon I may get a take-and-bake pizza if in the mood for one. Otherwise if I did not cook - it would be cold cereal, sandwiches, and microwave foods/ which I do not care for as a steady diet.
Yeah same here. Since I moved to a rural area 8 years ago my cooking skills have improved quite a bit. When you want ____ but you don't want to drive 20 miles to pick it up on a whim you get creative and learn how to make things from scratch.

I also think the internet is reviving a lot of lost food related arts like canning. Before the interwebs most people that didn't know anyone who canned their own food wouldn't even attempt it. Same thing goes for preparing exotic foods etc...

Sure people could buy books, but that isn't the same as being able to actually SEE it being done, instantly pull up various sources of info, get various methods/opinions, find fixes to problems etc...
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Old 10-08-2017, 12:05 AM
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Sure people could buy books, but that isn't the same as being able to actually SEE it being done, instantly pull up various sources of info, get various methods/opinions, find fixes to problems etc...
Watching a video(s) isn't the same as having a set of written instructions/diagrams/photos that can be referred to, notes written in the margins, or just sit and study/refer to one page as long as you want/or until you really "get it."

And if the electricity goes out, you can still read a book as often as you want/need without having to recharge batteries, etc.
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Old 10-08-2017, 12:07 AM
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Watching a video(s) isn't the same as having a set of written instructions/diagrams/photos that can be referred to, notes written in the margins, or just sit and study/refer to one page as long as you want/or until you really "get it."

And if the electricity goes out, you can still read a book as often as you want/need without having to recharge batteries, etc.
I have both.


Both is best.
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Old 10-08-2017, 11:53 PM
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YOU may not have done it till recently in the last 44 years, but I've BEEN DOING it (exclusively) for the last 17 years (Sans family bit.)
So PLEASE: The "lack of understanding" is LAUGHABLE.
I just finished cooking dinner, eating dinner, and doing the dishes.

It was late because I had a 2 hour business call after I got back from a brush fire (which fortunately was small as I was almost too tired to go after gimping my ass all over town.)

Sunday is laundry day, I usually clean the bathrooms on Saturday, etc...

Tonight I'm cleaning the place up, and tomorrow I'm cleaning up outside, because I'm having 4-5 dinner guests. And yes, I'll be both cooking dinner and doing the cleanup


(Chuckles).... lack of understanding indeed!
Edit: clothes are no big deal, but I HATE folding sox.
Took me YEARS to break the habit (did our own laundry.... and whatever was laying around growing up. If a trash can is full you empty it, if laundry needs doing, you do it etc)
Now I buy all identical sox and just sick them washed in the drawer.
Just pull 2 out.
Only sox that get folded (not all identical) are wool.
I'm sticking with the lack of understanding. It's one thing to wash the dishes, even if you clean the counters and the floor. It's a whole other thing to maintain the kitchen and the house and doing all the other things like baseboards, high dusting, wiping out cabinets, cleaning the fridge, the stove, pulling them out and cleaning under and behind them, moving the sofa to vacuum under and behind, getting in the cushions, etc.

Doing dishes and cleaning the bathroom are just about the easiest (mostly because they're the most obvious) part of house cleaning.
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Old 10-09-2017, 01:57 AM
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I'm sticking with the lack of understanding. It's one thing to wash the dishes, even if you clean the counters and the floor. It's a whole other thing to maintain the kitchen and the house and doing all the other things like baseboards, high dusting, wiping out cabinets, cleaning the fridge, the stove, pulling them out and cleaning under and behind them, moving the sofa to vacuum under and behind, getting in the cushions, etc.

Doing dishes and cleaning the bathroom are just about the easiest (mostly because they're the most obvious) part of house cleaning.



Who ELSE do you think does all that!?!
I also do the canning, 100% of the cooking, 100% of the cleaning, 100% of the yard work, 100% of...... (just like damn near EVERY OTHER single man and woman....) stacking the firewood, splitting the firewood (gas splitter in deference to my injuries), yesterday I was doing construction on my 2nd floor, (not much, i work slow, but still) scrubbed the toilet a few minutes ago, moved stuff to the shed before church....
Missed doing laundry today as I had to work on the truck....

Lack of understanding INDEED

....On YOUR part!
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Old 11-24-2019, 10:19 AM
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If you really want to be amazed look up a product called Lunchables and understand how many parents buy it to send to school with their kids for lunch that the company can afford to sponsor tons of TV ads and children programming.

A precautionary tale around trying to help folks. Along the remote country road that I live is a older women with adult daughter. This daughter has 4 children from as many different 'dads' none of which are around consistently. 2 of the children have been removed by the authorities. The other two, a small boy of about 8 and a baby are still there. Needless to say they are poor. A local church decided to help out those in the community that could not afford a Christmas dinner by donating the complete fixings of a frozen turkey, Stuffing mix, cans of pie filling, cranberry sauce and bake and serve rolls. This family was one they choose to help out.

A couple days after Christmas while I was walking along the dirt road connecting the properties I happen to see a couple of torn open plastic bag. Insides was the frozen turkey (now thawed and torn at by scavengers) the stuffing bags and the cans of other things. It turns out this family accepted the food, but because they did not know how or want to cook it, they tossed it out along the road.
I worked as a church janitor for a while. Part of that was food bank duties. Became pretty jaded as a result. It was rare when any of the "down and out" people would appreciate it. Many sob stories about how bad things were and people were "starving". Yet, get them a box of food and they would refuse most of it. Some would straight up tell you they wouldn't eat "that crap". Almost all would reject flour, tvp, honey, or anything of the like. Others would say they didn't own a can opener even though they drove there in brand new Cadillacs.
The one old timer who volunteered there printed out recipes to hand out, bought 50 can openers, etc. Still didn't help.
I've seen the premade peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Made me sad.
I grew up in the "city" on a small lot. Still learned to cook over (or under) a fire camping and out cutting firewood. Still helped mom, who made bread weekly, had us making butter, icecream, etc.
Lots of sociological reasons around all this maybe. It's just we have fallen too far into the consumer model.
Same with old popular mechanics /mechanics illustrated/ popular science magazines. Remember when they gave you project plans?
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Old 11-25-2019, 06:14 PM
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You're right, NY Min. Home arts are getting to be a little like lost magic.

What about all the men you see with neckties hanging over their crotches, because they didn't realize-- and no one in their lives told them-- they should have the local tailor at the dry cleaner shorten it for a few dollars?? Looks really bad!

I swear, you could even see somebody like the local prosecutor in a photo in a newspaper, or maybe even Trump walking around looking like that, when we all really should know better. Just because the department store doesn't put a little sign that says "Get it tailored to fit!" next to the display of ties.

I blame TV and radio for this attitude. People are really supposed to talk to other people a lot, and TV, movies, the radio, the computer, and video games are too distracting from that. In life, you're supposed to largely be occupied with relationships with other people, with swapping advice and other help with them, and people just don't understand that anymore. Because it's been replaced by keeping up with TV shows. You treat the actual people around you like they're not important, you don't think about them, and instead you're devoted to a show.

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When I saw them selling pre made peanut butter and jelly sandwiches several years ago at the store I knew that times were bad. But the most amazing situation was what happened one day when checking out a store with a case of Ramen noodles (not the microwave cup versions). The young lady at the counter expressed amazement at me buying so much ramen. I said I use the noodles in other dishes besides just as soup. She commented that it must be neat to know how to cook. She than went on to say that neither her or her mother cooks but her Grandmother made great pies. I staggered from the store in shook that anyone could believe making Top Ramen was cooking.
Wow, Matt gives great examples. Yes, I've seen those peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and lunchables.

Remember when Ramen and (homemade) peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were part of the stereotype of the college kid, grad student, bachelor, etc., who was lazy, cheap, or had low standards, and was not taking care of himself well at all? And now it's considered real cooking?? lol what?

I'm not sure I have any stories as bad as those yet, but... I've heard them. And I do have some bad stories.

I actually kind of disagree that convenience food is that horrible, though. I think that stuff like 7 11 and microwave food can have its place, and cooking yourself nice food from scratch has its place. The criticisms are very valid, but it can be very helpful to do something in a cheaper / quicker way. Sometimes there are more acceptable things at stores and restaurants than you think.

That said... I never set out to become a clothes horse, a person who's into very nice food, etc, but when you experience nice things enough... you start to really notice what's good about them. There's a reason why people with money have nice things. It's not all BS.

You can definitely eat better, and it definitely helps you out, if you know how to cook! There are a lot of recipes out there to try, and to add to your skills. And with the Internet, it's better than ever.
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Old 11-25-2019, 06:24 PM
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Good thread revived from the dead.

I guess what I made a few days ago would be an impossibility for most of those junk eating folks, chicken and dumpling from scratch, literally. I butchered the chicken ( a rooster that needed to go) and made the dumplings from flour and eggs from our chickens. Cooked the chicken in a pressure cooker since roosters can be tough.

Sometimes I feel like we might as well live in a different country. We live in a mostly Amish community and people around here do know how to make stuff and do things. I doubt a single neighbor around here had ramen noodles or take out pizza for dinner today.
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Old 11-27-2019, 12:04 AM
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Take out fast food has a lot to do with lack of cooking skills, as does both parents working & lots and lots of single parents with little time to cook. I am amazed at how many people eat out of microwaves, paper bags or pizza boxes. Which has & is the direct cause of all the gross obesity you see almost everywhere now days.

LOL, in this day & age, hand most a live chicken or small pig, they would not know what to do with it.

Taught ALL my children and grandchildren to cook, at least the basics. I literally cannot stand seeing good food cooked into something distasteful no one would want to eat. Basically, because if I pay for it, I don't want to see it wasted.
Back when I was in school (I know, it was back in the Dark Ages) Home Ec was a REQUIRED class, where we were taught both cooking and sewing. For Home Ec classes, cooking was done "From scratch". I also had the benefit of a mother who, although she also worked full time, also cooked from scratch, and taught me to do the same. She also taught me how to preserve food by freezing and canning.

Nowadays, if Home Ec is even offered at all in school, it's an elective class, not a required subject, and it's not all cooking from scratch, either.

Cooking from scratch, preservation (dehydrating and canning) are "life skills" that need to be taught to the younger generations, so if you HAVE those particular skills, PASS THEM ON!
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Old 11-27-2019, 12:12 AM
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Best thing my mom ever did was to let my sister and I in the kitchen to cook.
I tried to take home ec. in high school but they would not let me in 1967.
I did all I could to get my grandson started but now he is with microwave mom.
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Old 11-27-2019, 04:07 AM
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Back when I was in school (I know, it was back in the Dark Ages) Home Ec was a REQUIRED class, where we were taught both cooking and sewing. For Home Ec classes, cooking was done "From scratch". I also had the benefit of a mother who, although she also worked full time, also cooked from scratch, and taught me to do the same. She also taught me how to preserve food by freezing and canning.

Nowadays, if Home Ec is even offered at all in school, it's an elective class, not a required subject, and it's not all cooking from scratch, either.

Cooking from scratch, preservation (dehydrating and canning) are "life skills" that need to be taught to the younger generations, so if you HAVE those particular skills, PASS THEM ON!
I guess I was also in school in the Dark Ages. We had to take Home Ec (boys were just being allowed) and accounting. Accounting included how to use and balance a checkbook and how to pay bills. Many years later when I was working as a bank teller I had to teach some of my customers how to keep their checkbook. I was amazed that adults didnít have basic knowledge about their money. Some would get hundreds of dollars in overdraft fees every month because they never deducted expenditures from their balances. They just kept using their debit cards until they were denied.
We also had sewing as an elective so I graduated knowing how to mend my clothes. That also is basically a lost art.
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Old 12-18-2019, 07:56 PM
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Ok. Off the strict subject, but this all reminds me of a friend and his new bride. She did so called plastic weave crafts. Where you just pull yarn through a plastic grid sheet. Just because she could do that, he took to calling her a " pioneer woman". It's not just cooking thats sad nowdays.
Ok. Back to cooking
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:40 AM
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Want to get a laugh. Tell these fast food and pizza people about home canning and their eyes would pop out. lol. I save a lot of money doing my own cooking and never waste a thing. Even leftover veggies go in a plastic bag in the freezer for veg, soup. I sew, mend and even know how to darn a sock. I go to thrift stores for perfectly good clothes. What a joke this new generation is. I just sit back and laugh at them and all the money they waste. They would never survive a SHTF situation,
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Old 12-19-2019, 06:32 AM
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Somehow I missed this post first time around,but the OP first sentence hit home.

I was a "chef" at a country club for 20 years.We had a big movie theater type popcorn machine in the 19th hole(bar).
It broke down one day,heaven forbid if the millionaire doctors and lawyers didn't get their 3 cents of free popcorn.
So I was in the kitchen making big pots of it for opening,as the wait staff came thru the kitchen to clock in and start.

I'm not exagerating when I tell you there were 3-4 teenage girls standing by me watching,not 1 had a clue that it can be done that way.I'm dead serious,not internet BS.

Also went to some stores looking for "Jiffy pop" a while ago.The type that comes in the lillte tin foil pan that the foil pops up as it cooks.You can imagine the looks I got asking the employees if they had it.
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Old 12-19-2019, 06:46 AM
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This has lot to do with both parents working now. Nobody is at home anymore.
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Old 12-19-2019, 08:42 AM
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Somehow I missed this post first time around,but the OP first sentence hit home.

I was a "chef" at a country club for 20 years.We had a big movie theater type popcorn machine in the 19th hole(bar).
It broke down one day,heaven forbid if the millionaire doctors and lawyers didn't get their 3 cents of free popcorn.
So I was in the kitchen making big pots of it for opening,as the wait staff came thru the kitchen to clock in and start.

I'm not exagerating when I tell you there were 3-4 teenage girls standing by me watching,not 1 had a clue that it can be done that way.I'm dead serious,not internet BS.

Also went to some stores looking for "Jiffy pop" a while ago.The type that comes in the lillte tin foil pan that the foil pops up as it cooks.You can imagine the looks I got asking the employees if they had it.
I used to fix popcorn on the stove, that's how we did it when I was growing up. I haven't done it in a while but I used to do it for my kids when they were home. I'm not real big on the microwave popcorn, I get burnt out on it real quick, just isn't the same. I wonder if the Boy Scouts still sell the non-microwavable popcorn?
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Old 12-19-2019, 11:36 AM
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My Mom always made yeast rolls for Thanksgiving and Christmas. She used a sweet dough recipe which had just a little bit of sugar in it which also made it rise well. My wife learned from her and kept the tradition going. My DIL didn't continue the tradition, she buys Sister Shubert frozen yeast rolls and while they are edible they lack that yeasty smell and taste. My son and I used to always go back for turkey biscuit (roll) snacks later in the day. Not so much with Sister Shubert. I have tried a number of the frozen yeast rolls available and none of them pass muster.

My Mom would on occasion make a loaf (or two) of yeast bread (same recipe) to come out of the oven around 9:00PM and we would devour a loaf in minutes, slathering each slice with butter. Once when my brother was home he missed the first call and later said that bread smells good I think I will try a piece, we just chuckled and said too late.

I miss those days when the kitchen was a gathering place for family and treats would come from the oven. I plan to develop a no knead yeast bread loaf based upon the same recipe to satisfy my cravings. I think the secret is a triple rise, as I recall my wife let the dough rise twice before forming the rolls.
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Old 12-19-2019, 01:00 PM
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I was born off-grid & in winter the kitchen was the warmest place in the house. As such I spent much of my time there with my grandmother & mother who were always cooking. I learned from them at early age..

I have held cooking events to teach all the youngsters to scratch cook, bake, smoke, pickle & can ever since the were old enough to learn.

Youngsters CANNOT learn, unless you TEACH them.
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Old 12-19-2019, 01:52 PM
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My Mom always made yeast rolls for Thanksgiving and Christmas. She used a sweet dough recipe which had just a little bit of sugar in it which also made it rise well. My wife learned from her and kept the tradition going. My DIL didn't continue the tradition, she buys Sister Shubert frozen yeast rolls and while they are edible they lack that yeasty smell and taste. My son and I used to always go back for turkey biscuit (roll) snacks later in the day. Not so much with Sister Shubert. I have tried a number of the frozen yeast rolls available and none of them pass muster.

My Mom would on occasion make a loaf (or two) of yeast bread (same recipe) to come out of the oven around 9:00PM and we would devour a loaf in minutes, slathering each slice with butter. Once when my brother was home he missed the first call and later said that bread smells good I think I will try a piece, we just chuckled and said too late.

I miss those days when the kitchen was a gathering place for family and treats would come from the oven. I plan to develop a no knead yeast bread loaf based upon the same recipe to satisfy my cravings. I think the secret is a triple rise, as I recall my wife let the dough rise twice before forming the rolls.
Is your mom at the age where she cooked during WWII, or would have learned to cook during that time and had recipes that she was used to from that time?

I ask because my mom's fudge is nothing like any fudge I see anyone make. My wife refers to it as good, but really weird. The bread my mom makes is very heavy, good, but very heavy not at all like my wife's.

Turns out when talking to my mom that these recipes that she has been making my whole life are handwritten from my great granny who was raising kids during WWII and they are very, very similar to the ones in a cookbook my wife has that was passed down to her that is a WWII book. It is all about how to adjust recipes and make what you are used to from the rations you could get.

Great piece of history there, and especially family history, but the food will not come out like you expect it to now with any ingredient just a few minutes drive away.
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