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Old 12-28-2018, 09:48 AM
LoongLee LoongLee is offline
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This plant is usually referred to as bois D'arc instead of bodark because the French explorers saw the indians using it for bows. Growing up in Kentucky we called it hedge apples and would have contests throwing them at each other. Ha, hurt like hell!!
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Old 12-28-2018, 03:07 PM
Jayhawker Jayhawker is offline
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Default In short, yes

I've done some extensive research on this topic. Bodark seeds can be removed in an industrial process patented by a company in Iowa called Osage Healthcare that uses the oil to produce a high quality cosmetic oil that is sold as an alternative to costly oils produced from rainforest plants. From the videos I've seen the process wouldn't be incredibly costly to replicate on a small scale and as long as you weren't selling the seeds the likelihood of you being prosecuted for patent stealing is virtually nonexistant. With the right equipment you could transform the highly laborious process of removing the seeds by hand into a comparably easy process whereby you end up with large amounts of seeds removed from pulp. As a backup food production plan this one is uniquely smart because people would not be trying to eat them even in the apocalypse due to the incredibly laborious process of trying to remove the seeds by hand. They have lots of oil and protein. Toasted with salt they are said to taste like most seeds, I imagine a sort of flour could be produced through grinding. The seeds are thought to be nutritious and edible, but not as palatable as sunflower seeds for instance. If processed with equipment and cooked right they could be a reliable and valuable food source that would be abundant and accessible in SHTF. Bodark trees grow like weeds and they virtually never fail to yield fruit with a total lack of fertilizer of any kind. Most people wouldn't bat an eye at a person carrying around a basket full of them, and nobody would try to steal the basket from someone carrying one. They are easily found and harvested, the real issue is the processing.
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Old 12-28-2018, 03:26 PM
Jayhawker Jayhawker is offline
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There is the video where the processing technique is described. 90 gallons in a week would be a couple hundred pounds of seeds, with smaller manually designed equipment I'm sure it would perhaps take twice as long to process that much, but 200 pounds of food in 2 weeks with something that is virtually guaraunteed to be abundant with a 2 man team working together seems totally doable in a survival situation, that means in a month you could have 400 lbs of seeds, in 2 months 800 lbs, in three months 1200 lbs. Grinding as needed, for a group of six people that would be enough protein rich meal for a year, and still leave four other people to produce food in other ways for the three months that it would take to produce that much, leaving the other nine months of the year open for other foraging/food production activities to be taken part in with no labor cost to the group. It could be like a rotating duty that people only had to do every few days. Assuming you had a water supply to do this with, it seems a manual system to definitely be engineered that could function with a total lack of power.
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Old 12-29-2018, 09:03 AM
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[quote=Jayhawker;19238404][url=" Assuming you had a water supply to do this with, it seems a manual system to definitely be engineered that could function with a total lack of power.[/quote]

Thanks. It might be possible to mash up several bodarks, place in a container full of water and agitate so that the seeds come free of the pulp. I assume the density of the seeds is different from that of the pulp so they should seperate and be harvestable. It might be more work than the mechanical method but should work in a SHTF situation.
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