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Old 01-19-2013, 06:45 PM
9MMare 9MMare is offline
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Originally Posted by Nutty Old Geezer View Post
Beans do take a longer time to cook. I worry about the grid and economy as my number 1 SHTF. Both will mean energy is limited either by not coming out of the plug or too costly.
That's why I love lentils....they dont require soaking, cook up quickly, and are more compact than beans, almost as compact as rice. Great for storage.

I've also started prepping lentils for my dogs...again an easy, cheap readily available protein source post SHTF. (Dont know about for cats, cats require more protein but less food...volume...in general than dogs).
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Old 01-19-2013, 07:05 PM
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I have had nothing but trouble trying to use light red goya kidney beans for chili. I let them soak for 24 hours, then boil them for an hour then simmer in the chili for a few hours. Some are nice and soft. Some are hard, and then some a grainy. What gives?
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Old 01-19-2013, 07:24 PM
NoTea4U NoTea4U is offline
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@bilmac - I've always purchased my millet hulled, but it contains the occasional full seed. The hulls are black in color. I don't know the precise variety, but I don't believe it would be red proso.

When it comes to growing seed crops, I direct my effort into quinoa instead of millet. I value millet while we have cheap access to it, but only due to the price and versatility. If I had to grow my own, I'd have to hull it. I'd also have to contend with seed heads which don't mature evenly and are prone to shattering. Millet has the advantage of producing well in drought or when a late spring prevents other crops from being planted, but quinoa shares a similar advantage. You mentioned you would be trying quinoa this year and I think you are making a great decision. I'd stay your present course with growing, but do consider millet for your food preps. Millet will cost you less to obtain, and it is a great extender in your food dishes. The value is exceptional, provided someone else is addressing it's pains.

@Geezer - You have a good point about the challenge of cooking beans in a grid down/bug out scenario. I expect that at some point in the near future, time will be a luxury in short supply. My pressure canner has gathered too much dust this winter. Maybe it's a good time to fire up the old cook stove for a pot of chili. Thanks for helping me think about this!

@Tuskin - Try cooking the beans first, in nothing but clear running water. Add them to your chili after they are soft. I think this will solve your problem. By combining your ingredients with the beans after only an hour, you're introducing salt. That's stabilizing the beans and preventing them from reaching their ideal texture.
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Old 01-20-2013, 07:50 AM
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I've asked this question in the Homesteading section but no response. I'm planning on pressure canning pintos in quart jars. I'm going to soak them overnight, drain the water, put in fresh water and boil them for 30 minutes, then pressure can them at 10psi for 90 minutes. This technique worked beautifully for another member. My question: is there any reason that I should not or could not include some pieces of ham or bacon? The processing time is adequate for meat. I'm just not finding any information on this. I know that if I add spices, that may hinder the beans from becoming soft and it can also affect the taste for LTS. I haven't decided yet about that, but I want to confirm the meat issue before I begin.
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Old 01-20-2013, 08:17 AM
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I've asked this question in the Homesteading section but no response. I'm planning on pressure canning pintos in quart jars. I'm going to soak them overnight, drain the water, put in fresh water and boil them for 30 minutes, then pressure can them at 10psi for 90 minutes. This technique worked beautifully for another member. My question: is there any reason that I should not or could not include some pieces of ham or bacon? The processing time is adequate for meat. I'm just not finding any information on this. I know that if I add spices, that may hinder the beans from becoming soft and it can also affect the taste for LTS. I haven't decided yet about that, but I want to confirm the meat issue before I begin.
Ham and bacon are salty...maybe affect the beans the same as adding salt?
I always can mine plain and season them up when we eat them.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:03 AM
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I guess some have had success canning ingredients together, but whenever I do it I don't like the taste of the results. Several times I have tried canning a complete stew and when I use it later seems like the flavors have blended to taste like wallpaper paste.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:15 AM
Nutty Old Geezer Nutty Old Geezer is offline
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Originally Posted by Tusken Raider View Post
I have had nothing but trouble trying to use light red goya kidney beans for chili. I let them soak for 24 hours, then boil them for an hour then simmer in the chili for a few hours. Some are nice and soft. Some are hard, and then some a grainy. What gives?
I see your mistake. Chili has NO beans. Beans are a cheap filler for poor quality chili. On another board there is a laughing war that has been going on for years about this. Chili was first made in San Antonio, Texas. It has no veggie material in it if properly made. It is meat stewed with spices. MAYBE a little masa carina to thicken if you don't have time to cook it til properly done. Chili was developed to use bad cuts of meat that were too tough to eat otherwise. You can ADD beans to chili but chili has NO beans. One of the favorite comments from the Texans in reply to someone from the far north is " I did not know New York was a chili capitol of the world". We take our chili serious down these parts.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by NoTea4U View Post
@bilmac - I've always purchased my millet hulled, but it contains the occasional full seed. The hulls are black in color. I don't know the precise variety, but I don't believe it would be red proso.

When it comes to growing seed crops, I direct my effort into quinoa instead of millet. I value millet while we have cheap access to it, but only due to the price and versatility. If I had to grow my own, I'd have to hull it. I'd also have to contend with seed heads which don't mature evenly and are prone to shattering. Millet has the advantage of producing well in drought or when a late spring prevents other crops from being planted, but quinoa shares a similar advantage. You mentioned you would be trying quinoa this year and I think you are making a great decision. I'd stay your present course with growing, but do consider millet for your food preps. Millet will cost you less to obtain, and it is a great extender in your food dishes. The value is exceptional, provided someone else is addressing it's pains.

@Geezer - You have a good point about the challenge of cooking beans in a grid down/bug out scenario. I expect that at some point in the near future, time will be a luxury in short supply. My pressure canner has gathered too much dust this winter. Maybe it's a good time to fire up the old cook stove for a pot of chili. Thanks for helping me think about this! We are located at the BOL so we don't plan to go anywhere. If you are a BO type the glass needs to be packed carefully. It is a heavy system for a BO so better have a big BO truck.

@Tuskin - Try cooking the beans first, in nothing but clear running water. Add them to your chili after they are soft. I think this will solve your problem. By combining your ingredients with the beans after only an hour, you're introducing salt. That's stabilizing the beans and preventing them from reaching their ideal texture.
Beans in chili! Heathen!
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:35 AM
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My mom always made us kids a super simple dish that we loved which used dried beans. Its a simple beans and rice recipe the got some from Brazilian friends of theirs. She makes a simple chili recipie (not spicy). Pour over rice, top with cheese and lettuce, sprinkle lemon juice.

I know cheese, lettuce, and lemon juice are not long-term food storage items, but whith a little imagination and experimentation you might could find some substitutes.

Four of my wifes siblings were adopted from Haiti and a couple of them still prefer beans and rice or noodles over any other American food. It probably the most common food in the world.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by NickiTX View Post
I've asked this question in the Homesteading section but no response. I'm planning on pressure canning pintos in quart jars. I'm going to soak them overnight, drain the water, put in fresh water and boil them for 30 minutes, then pressure can them at 10psi for 90 minutes. This technique worked beautifully for another member. My question: is there any reason that I should not or could not include some pieces of ham or bacon? The processing time is adequate for meat. I'm just not finding any information on this. I know that if I add spices, that may hinder the beans from becoming soft and it can also affect the taste for LTS. I haven't decided yet about that, but I want to confirm the meat issue before I begin.
My wife has been canning for over 40 years. She either uses Rodale or the Ball Book. Her method for beans. She washes and rinses times three to make sure dirt is off. She soaks overnight - about 18hr min to 24. Rinse again. Places into the jars. She does NOT cook them between soaking and canning. Into each quart she puts a tea spoon of sea salt into each quart. If she uses bacon end pieces she uses 1/4 tsp sea salt. If she uses ham she also uses1/4 tsp sea salt. The jars are run in a dish washer on sterilize before putting beans in. Pressure can at 10 lbs. per the Rodale (she uses 65 minutes but go by the Rodale or Ball Book) and turn off burner. Let the pressure come down to zero before removing. I like my beans with the salty flavor. Don't have to use it. For spicy flavor I grind up hot links and add 4 heaping table spoons to the middle of the jar. It spreads around during processing and makes a mild spicy flavor sort of like Ranch Style Beans. If you just put in chunks of the hot links they will cook the flavor out and be bland. When using the canned beans she heats them to a boil and reduces to simmer for 10 minutes. I am going into the kitchen shortly to make me some re-fried beans for lunch. Heat oil in skillet til hot, add beans and mash well turning often. Cooked with lard from bacon or if you want healthy use olive oil. I like my re-fried with with bacon chopped up with some onion on top. Getting hungry here. This jar was canned in Feb 2010. The top beans sometimes look dark on top but with heating on the stove the dark disappears.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:45 AM
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beans are to easy to cook not to have around. they can be cooked over a camp fire if need be. they are easy to store, cheep to buy, There good for you, and taste good if you cook them right. even if you hate beans they can keep you alive or you can trade them for something else when shtf
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Old 01-20-2013, 01:00 PM
NoTea4U NoTea4U is offline
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Originally Posted by Nutty Old Geezer View Post
Beans in chili! Heathen!
Funny, the that's just what the JWs called me a few years back. They interrupted my shower and I came to the door in only a towel, which promptly hit the floor as I reached for the doorknob. Oh what fond memories! He was aghast and she just smiled at me... a HUGE grin. Unless of course that was you. Then her grin was small. Minuscule really. Barely a mild smirk. (HUGE GRIN!!!)

I have loads of experience processing dried beans into ready to consume foods, but little experience with canning beans. Cooking under pressure is quite different. I will try your method with my chili. My heathen chili with beans. I should make some special labels for it... heathen chili lables with fire and brimstone on the front!
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Old 01-20-2013, 05:33 PM
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I forgot to add when we open up a jar to eat, she adds about a inch of water to the pan to help heat them up evenly. She just stirs and it makes a bit of "thick juice" for lack of a better term.
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Old 01-20-2013, 10:58 PM
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Quote:
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I forgot to add when we open up a jar to eat, she adds about a inch of water to the pan to help heat them up evenly. She just stirs and it makes a bit of "thick juice" for lack of a better term.
My favorite part of beans as a child (back when dirt was still rocks) was the "thick juice" of the beans over hot cornbread. Man, talk about some fine eating.

Where I come from chili has beans because it's more farmers than ranchers. Farmers had lots of beans and one or two cows/pigs for meat each year. Ranchers had lots of meat and fewer beans. Both had much tough meat... I thought "bully beef" was a technical term until I was past grown.
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:34 AM
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Our standing joke is the best chili is made from the meat from between the horns!
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Old 01-21-2013, 12:11 PM
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I have recently began stocking alot of various beans. I have been storing up pasta, rice, and other staples for about a year, but not many beans. I have tried to stick to the mentality of only stocking foods that we eat regularly. Well, we don't eat dried beans. I know they are a important staple for preppers so I felt it was time. So far I have lentils, black, navy, red, lima, blackeye, and red pinto beans, along with split green peas and chickpeas. Are there any varieties that store better than others? Is dessicant neccissary? I use mylar and O2 absorbers. Also, what are some of your favorite ways to cook them? I think I need to start learning now so I have it figured out before it is a critical time.
Consider adding to your larder the following beans....Anasazi's, Yellow Eyes, and Mayocoba's

hundreds of bean recipes on the net...however, a seasoning that you might try is Sazon Goya con Culantro y Achiote

http://www.goya.com/english/product_...sazon-bouillon

additionally, I've discovered Badia's Complete Seasoning which works great to flavor beans...

http://www.badiaspices.com/ready-made-blends/

however, spices, and spice blends do have a short shelf life...
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Old 01-22-2013, 09:52 AM
Atra Mors Atra Mors is offline
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I have had nothing but trouble trying to use light red goya kidney beans for chili. I let them soak for 24 hours, then boil them for an hour then simmer in the chili for a few hours. Some are nice and soft. Some are hard, and then some a grainy. What gives?
switch over to the Anasazi's....you'll end up with a far better tasting chilli then with those kidney beans

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-are-anasazi-beans.htm
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:54 AM
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As this thread was progressing I came across a small article in Backwoods Home magazine under the column by "ask Jackie". It is in line with our discussion of what to do with old pinto beans.

In the article she claims that her pinto beans were 16 years old and NOT stored in mylar with O2 absorbers. Instead she simply stored them in gallon jars and popcorn tins. She goes on to say that she didn't want to beat them up by boiling them for a zillion hours so she just canned them instead.

1. Boil clean beans for 2 minutes after pouring boiling water over them.
2. Remove from heat and let soak covered for 2 hours.
3. Heat to boiling and drain saving liquid.
4. Pack jars 3/4 full with hot beans
5. add small pieces of fried lean bacon or ham if desired.
6. Fill jars with hot cooking liquid.
7. Leaving 1 inch of head space.
8. Process pints for 65 minutes and quarts for 75 minutes at 10 pounds of pressure.

She claims that even with improperly stored beans this old that they were soft and good to be served alone or turned into frijoles.

I have no idea if it is true, I simply offer it as something to try if you have old pinto beans. I personally don't have any pintos older than 1 year at the moment so I can't really try it. However for those you that have a bunch of old beans around and do want to try it I would love to hear what your results were.
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:15 AM
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By canning them she was pressure cooking them. I'm gonna have to try that.
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Old 01-25-2013, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
By canning them she was pressure cooking them. I'm gonna have to try that.
Yes, she says in the article that this recipe was done in a pressure canner.
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